EVENTS AND TRAININGS

fall 2020 events 

 

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, in-person 2020 events and trainings are very limited or have moved to Webex. While we will not be conducting much in-person training, we are happy to provide live trainings, discussions, and workshops through Webex, Zoom, or Blackboard. If you would like to schedule a virtual training for your class, office, RSO, or department, please reach out to Stacy Galbo, Deputy Title IX Coordinator for Educational Outreach and Training/Investigator, at sgalbo2@atu.edu. Examples of previous training topics include bystander intervention, Title IX basics, survivor support, consent and healthy relationships, neurobiology of trauma, rape culture, and more.

 

Event schedule 

 

Until further notice, all fall 2020 events will be offered virtually.To join an event, go to: https://atu.webex.com/meet/sgalbo2.
Additional information is posted below if listed events have an in-person option.

 

New Policy Informational Sessions. Join a virtual informational session to learn about changes to ATU policy related to Title IX based on new regulations from the Department of Education. All sessions are open to all students, faculty, and staff.

Know Your IX. Stop by one of these informational meetings to learn about your rights under Title IX, where and how to report cases of harassment (sexual misconduct), and opportunities for getting involved in sexual assault and relationship violence prevention on campus.

Survivor Support 101. When we consider how many people are impacted by sexual and relationship violence, there is a good chance someone might disclose his or her own experience to you. This workshop explores the impacts of violence, resources available, and practical things you can do and say to support the survivors in your life.

Survivor Support 2.0: Neurobiology of Trauma. Trauma can impact a person’s brain, body, and memory in a number of (sometimes very confusing!) ways. This presentation will examine the neurobiology of trauma, specifically trauma from sexual or relationship violence. We will discuss how the body and brain respond to traumatic events and re-frame distressing symptoms and behaviors to emphasize how individuals adapt to overwhelming stress. Armed with this knowledge, participants will be better able to support survivors of sexual and relationship violence by understanding some of the weird subconscious things we do in the wake of trauma.

Survivor Ally Training. This workshop combines Survivor Support 101 and Survivor Support 2.0: Neurobiology of Trauma. When we consider how many people are impacted by sexual and relationship violence, there is a good chance someone might disclose his or her own experience to you. This workshop explores the impacts of violence, resources available, and practical things you can do and say to support the survivors in your life. We will also examine the neurobiology of trauma, specifically trauma from sexual or relationship violence. We will discuss how the body and brain respond to traumatic events and re-frame distressing symptoms and behaviors to emphasize how individuals adapt to overwhelming stress. Armed with this knowledge, participants will be better able to support survivors of sexual and relationship violence by understanding some of the weird subconscious things we do in the wake of trauma.

Active Bystander Training. We all have the ability to step in and speak up when we observe concerning behavior. This bystander intervention workshop focuses on practical things you can do to safely intervene in troubling circumstances.

Combating Rape Culture. How do music, advertisements, movies, and TV impact the way we view sexual violence? What practical steps can we take to fight rape culture in our spheres of influence? This workshop takes a look at the deep roots of gender-based violence and provides attendees with practical tools for dismantling myths about sexual violence encountered in everyday life.

Couplets. There are always signs in an unhealthy relationship. While everyone has behaviors we can work on, we also shouldn’t brush aside bad behavior as “cute” or “trivial.” The Couplets features a series of videos that highlight unhealthy relationship behaviors. If you’re seeing three or more of these unhealthy behaviors in your relationship, it’s a problem. Don’t be ashamed to tell someone when #thatsnotlove.

Because I Love You. “Because I Love You” may seem like such a sweet and simple statement, but in an unhealthy relationship, it’s often used as a tool for manipulation and control. It can be a cover for a put-down, a way to assign blame, or a deflection of responsibility. In this workshop, participants will learn to recognize when words of love are used to abuse.

Love Labyrinth. In an abusive relationship, sometimes it can feel like you’re trapped with no ability to leave. Even the tiniest of behaviors from your partner can impact your self-esteem, independence, and ability to recognize the relationship you deserve. In this workshop, participants will learn how gaslighting and intimidation tactics can trap a person in a web of confusion and low self-esteem.


 The Title IX Office is responsible for providing educational training programs to assist members of the University community in understanding discrimination, harassment, and retaliation, and how to address behaviors that violate University policy.

 

As a result of Title IX Education and Outreach Efforts, students will:

  1. Gain knowledge and understanding of how to navigate instances of harassment (sexual misconduct).

  2. Recognize that the Title IX Office is committed to fostering campus cultures of respect free from gender-based discrimination.

  3. Become empowered to safely intervene when problematic behavior is observed.

Training and education are fundamental to maintaining an environment free from discriminatory harassment and retaliation. The Title IX Office maintains information that explains in simple, understandable terms the University’s policies and procedures concerning discrimination, harassment, and retaliation and will maintain copies of the brochures in the Title IX Office and at other offices where persons are likely to seek counseling and advice regarding discrimination, harassment, and retaliation.

Managers, supervisors, faculty, deans, directors, and department heads are responsible for informing employees who are under their direction or supervision of the University's policies prohibiting discrimination, harassment, and retaliation.

More information about the University's Equal Opportunity, Harassment (Sexual Misconduct), and Nondiscrimination Policy can be found here.