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JonesDr. Kelly Jones

Assistant Professor of History

History and Political Science
Witherspoon Building
407 West Q Street
Russellville, AR 72801
Phone: (479) 968-0455
E-mail: kjones116@atu.edu

Education

BA - Univ of Arkansas-Little Rock
MA - University of North Texas
PHD - University of Arkansas

Recently Taught Courses

HIST 2003 - U.S. HISTORY TO 1877
HIST 2043 - HONORS U.S. HISTORY TO 1877
HIST 3103 - THE OLD SOUTH, 1607-1865
HIST 4153 - HISTORY OF ARKANSAS
HIST 4213 - SOUTHERN WOMEN'S HISTORY
HIST 4953 - UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH
HIST 4953 - UR:STONEWALL JACKSON 1860-1863
HIST 6893 - IND: AFRI-AMER AGRI ARK 1800S

PROFESSIONAL ACTIVITIES

Professor Jones specializes in American slavery, usually focusing her research efforts on the Trans-Mississippi South, especially Arkansas. After receiving a BA at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock and an MA at the University of North Texas, Jones earned a PhD from the University of Arkansas in 2014. Since then, she has worked on uncovering the histories of slave life on the ground in Arkansas, culminating in a forthcoming monograph by the University of Georgia Press. Professor Jones carries an enduring interest in the history of Arkansas as the western edge of the American South, which informs her teaching and participation at public history events.

“White Fear of Black Rebellion, 1819-1866” in The Elaine Massacre and Arkansas: A Century of Atrocity and Resistance, 1819-1919, edited by Guy Lancaster (Little Rock: Butler Center Books, a subsidiary of the University of Arkansas Press, 2018).

“Bondswomen on Arkansas’s Cotton Frontier: Migration, Labor, Family, and Resistance among an Exploited Class,” in Arkansas Women: Their Lives and Times, edited by Cherisse Jones-Branch and Gary Edwards (Athens: University of Georgia Press, 2018). 

“Freedom at the Pine Bluffs, 1864: A Research Note,” Arkansas Historical Quarterly, Spring 2018.

“Doubtless Guilty: Lynching and Slaves in Antebellum Arkansas,” in Bullets and Fire: Lynching and Authority in Arkansas from Slavery through the 1930s, edited by Guy Lancaster (Fayetteville: University of Arkansas Press, 2017).

“Chattels, Pioneers, and Pilgrims for Freedom: Arkansas’s Bonded Travelers.” Arkansas Historical Quarterly 75 (Winter 2016): 319-335.

“Women after the War” in Competing Memories: The Legacy of Arkansas’s Civil War, edited by Mark K. Christ (Little Rock: Butler Center Books, a subsidiary of the University of Arkansas Press, 2016). 

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