First-Generation Student Highlights

Rosa Gutierrez

First-Gen Highlight

CLASS: Sophomore 

MAJOR: Emergency Managment
HOMETOWN: Dardanelle, AR

 

WHAT DOES BEING A FIRST-GENERATION STUDENT MEAN TO YOU?

"Being a First-Generation Student is an honorable achievement for me to inspire younger students to step out of their comfort zone and achieve their dreams. I feel so proud and accomplished of where I stand today but I am always inspired to strive for more."

WHAT IS YOUR BIGGEST CONCERN AS A FIRST-GEN AND HOW DID YOU OVERCOME IT? 

"My biggest concern as a First-Gen is failing and disappointing my family. I do not let this mind set overcome myself, because by being afraid of failure it can stop me from doing things that can move me forward to achieve my goals.  To overcome this, I look at failure as a learning experience because this is how we grow and how we keep from making the same mistake again. Accepting and learning from those insights is key to succeeding in life."

WHAT ADVICE WOULD YOU GIVE TO AN INCOMING FIRST-GENERATION STUDENT? 

"The advice I would give First-Generation Freshman is to find a way to create a home away from home but at college! Meaning to get involved in clubs and organizations on campus. Find confidence in how hard you have worked to reach this point and know that your family is proud of you and your ambition."

Hunter Phillips

First-Gen Student

Class: Senior

 

Major: Management and Marketing minor in Business Data Analytics
Hometown: Sherwood, AR 

 

WHAT DOES BEING A FIRST-GENERATION STUDENT MEAN TO YOU?

"I feel proud, blessed, and grateful that my parents worked hard and are able to support me and allow me to have opportunities that weren't provided for them when they were younger." 

WHAT WAS YOUR BIGGEST CONCERN AS A FIRST-GEN AND HOW DID YOU OVERCOME IT?

"My biggest concern when I came to Tech was figuring out what I wanted to study at college. I overcame this by taking my basic classes, figuring out what I was good at and choosing a degree  that gives me many opportunities to build a good life for me and my family."

WHAT ADVICE WOULD YOU GIVE TO AN INCOMING FIRST-GENERATION STUDENT?  

 "I would tell an incoming first generation student that they are going to learn a lot about themselves over the next four years. That there are going to be a lot of fun times but that there will also be rough times. I would tell them to get involved and make sure they buy a pair a rain boots for when campus floods"

 

Amanda Hampton 
Amanda Hampton  

Class: FRESHMAN 

MAJOR: DOUBLE MAJOR IN ENGLISH AND CREATIVE WRITING
MINOR: SPANISH
HOMETOWN: MURRIETA, CA

 

WHAT DOES BEING A FIRST-GENERATION STUDENT MEAN TO YOU?

"Being a first-gen allows me to have the power to change the future of my family forever. Education is something that is immensely important to me, and I would not be who I am today without the wonderful institutions that I have been a part of thus far. Being able to hold onto the empowerment that I receive through education and share that with those around me is monumental enough for me. Even if I never have children to share this with, I know that my educational journey is important in the Hampton history books."

WHAT WAS YOUR BIGGEST CONCERN AS A FIRST-GEN AND HOW DID YOU OVERCOME IT? 

"My biggest concern as a first-gen was being clueless. Not having either of my parents go through college, I had no one to aid me in the process of doing the more administrative tasks (applications, scholarships, financial aid, etc.). Rather than using this against me, however, I decided to change my perspective. I used this challenge as an opportunity to gain independence and develop my skills to seek assistance, find information, and make my four years at ATU the best that I possibly could."

WHAT ADVICE WOULD YOU GIVE TO AN INCOMING FIRST-GENERATION STUDENT? 

"The best piece of advice that I could give to an incoming first-gen student would be not to compare your journey with those around you. Not having parents to show you the ropes on your transition to college is an experience that is difficult to navigate, but is so doable. Have faith in yourself to be able to ask for help when you need it and utilize the resources around you, and take it into your own hands. Every student has a different journey and a different internal pacing, so do not feel defeated if things initially don't seem to be working out the way that you envisioned."