What is Title IX?

Most people associate Title IX with athletics only.  But did you know that Title IX's language is actually designed to eliminate discrimination in the entire educational setting based on sex?  This means all educational programs including academics, athletics and any other activities operated by the University.   

Definition of Title IX by the United States Department of Education, Office of Civil Rights:      

“Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 prohibits discrimination based on sex in education programs and activities that receive federal financial assistance.

The U.S. Department of Education gives grants of financial assistance to schools and colleges.  The Title IX regulation describes the conduct that violates Title IX.  Examples of the types of discrimination that are covered under Title IX include sexual harassment; the failure to provide equal opportunity in athletics; discrimination in a school’s science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) courses and programs; and discrimination based on pregnancy. The Title IX regulation is enforced by OCR and is in the code of federal regulations at 34 CFR Part 106.

Title IX prohibits retaliation for filing an OCR complaint or for advocating for a right protected by Title IX. Title IX also prohibits employment discrimination, but employment discrimination complaints filed with OCR are generally referred to the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission.”

What does Title IX do?

Title IX helps to eliminate barriers caused by gender discrimination in athletics and educational programs, particularly in the STEM related programs.  Title IX requires fair treatment for pregnant and parenting students and prohibits bullying, sexual harassment, sexual assault, or any behavior that creates obstacles to education based on gender.     

Who does Title IX apply to?

Title IX applies to all faculty, staff, and students.   

Campus Climate Survey

On January 22, 2014, President Barack Obama established the White House Task Force to Protect Students from Sexual Assault. The first report prepared by this task force addressed the need for all universities to conduct campus climate surveys in an effort to learn what the barriers are to reporting.
 

"We know from decades of research that victims rarely report sexual assault to law enforcement. Many victims do not even access formal services, like crisis centers. Thus, official statistics under represent the extent of the problem on any one campus. Further, campus response, intervention, and prevention efforts will be more successful if they are tailored to the needs of each campus community. Understanding other climate issues, such as students’ knowledge about reporting policies and resources for victims, their attitudes about prevention, and their perceptions about how their community is addressing the problem of sexual violence, are critical pieces of information for improving campus responses."  -exerpt from Not Alone.gov.  

Arkansas Tech initiated our first Campus Climate Survey in the Spring of 2014.  A link to a copy of this report may be found here:  Campus Climate Survey, Spring 2014.

Not Alone Website 

Who do I contact for Title IX information?

All recipients of federal funding must designate a Title IX Coordinator.  It is the Title IX Coordinator's responsibility to ensure the University is complying with Title IX regulations.  The Title IX Coordinator also investigates any complaints based on sexual harassment, sexual assault, and gender discrimination for faculty, students, and staff.

The Title IX Coordinator for Arkansas Tech University is Jennifer Fleming.   

Contact Information:

Administration Building, Suite 212
Phone Number:  479-498-6020
Fax Number:  479-880-4430
email address:  jfleming@atu.edu


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