TWENTIETH Annual Student Research Symposium

 

 

Thursday, March 14, 2019

Session 2

Doc Bryan 242 (Multi-Purpose Room)

Time Presenter Mentor Title of the Presentation
8:00-8:15  Winter Allen  Mostafa Hemmati  

POTENTIAL WAVES WITH LARGE CURRENT BEHIND THE SHOCK FRONT

8:15-8:30  Michael Anderson  Mostafa Hemmati  

WAVE PROFILE FOR ELECTRON SHOCK WAVES WITH LARGE CURRENT BEHIND THE SHOCK FRONT

8:30-8:45  Jessica Buenrostro, Allie Roach , Candy Roberts and Hunter Vickers  Michael G. Davis and Jason A. Patton 

REFINING EFFICIENT METHODS TO LOCATE LEGACY OIL AND GAS WELLS

8:45-9:00  Grant Collier  Rodney Roosevelt  

DEVELOPMENT OF NORMATIVE DATA FOR TEST OF VARIABLES OF ATTENTION (TOVA)

9:00-9:15  Benjamin Justice   Mariusz P. Gajewski   IMPROVING EFFECTIVENESS OF WATER STERILIZATION PHOTOCATALYSTS
9:15-9:30  Siddhi R. Patel  and Kallie M. Mendenhall   Rajib Choudhury   

MICROENVIRONMENT SENSITIVE NEAR-INFRARED EMITTING FLUOROPHORE

9:30-9:45  

Cherysh Rone, and Preston Wilson

 Jordan Thibodeaux and Rodney Roosevelt  

THE EFFECT OF INTERNAL SPEECH ON APPROACH AND AVOIDANCE OF ALCOHOL CUES

9:45-10:00  Brad Martsching  Mathew Young  

AFM STUDY OF COPPER PLATING

10:00-10:15  Kevin McDannold  Jessica Young  

PROPAGATION OF GENERALIZED GAUSSIAN BEAMS IN QUADRATIC INDEX MEDIA

10:15-10:30  Madison Craig   Robin Jaime Dalton   

THE EFFECT OF SEROTONIN ON SMOOTH MUSCLE REACTIVITY IN MESENTERIC ARTERIES AND CONTROL OF SYSTEMIC BLOOD PRESSURE

10:30-10:45  Brayden Meador  Sarah Stein  

CLOSETED AND VEILED: HOMOSEXUALITY IN EARLY BRITISH LITERATURE

10:45-11:00  Tanner Williams  David Eshelman   

THE PLAYGROUND KING

11:00-11:15  Cameron Zielke  Geoffery Ecker  

DNA EXTRACTION TO SUPPORT SEQUENCING OF AIR PARTICULATE SAMPLES

11:15-11:30  Jasmine Thompson  Justin Moss  

THE IMPACTS OF MUTUALITY ON RELATIONSHIP COMMITMENT AND SATISFACTION

11:30-11:45  Betsie Rodriguez   Sarah Stein   

EIGHTEENTH CENTURY WOMEN IN VISUAL MEDIA

11:45- 12:00  Clara Rorick   Sarah Stein  

WOMEN THROUGH THE LENS OF WILLIAM BLAKE

12:00- 1:00   Lunch Break

 

1:00-1:15  Starlene “Star” Sharp  Virginia Jones and Alexis Johnson  

THE FEMININE NARRATIVE

1:15-1:30  Meaghan Wilt  Sarah Stein  

FRIVOLOUS, VAIN, AND INFERIOR TO MEN: VIEWING WOMEN IN EIGHTEENTH CENTURY ENGLAND

1:30-1:45   1Brayden Butler  Seyed Hosseini and Mostafa Hemmati  

APPLICATION OF HYDROGEN IN TRANSPORTATION ENGINES

1:45-2:00   Evan Owens  Seyed Ehsan Hosseini and John Krohn  

EFFECTS OF THERMAL RECUPERATION ON THE CHARACTERISTCS OF ASYMMETRIC NON-PRIMIXED MESO-SCALE VORTEX COMBUSTION

2:00-2:15  Garrison Phillips,  Justin Stroud, Damian Spencer, Alan Mejia and Mohammad Alanazi   Seyed Ehsan Hosseini and John Krohn   

BIOGAS DIGESTER WITH FILTRATION

2:15-2:30   Eric Smith  Seyed Ehsan Hosseini  

WEARABLE THERMOELECTRIC GENERATORS: A REVIEW

2:30- 2:45  Blake Ludwig and Kallie Mendenhall  Franklin D. Hardcastle   

BOND VALENCE – BOND LENGTH CORRELATIONS FOR PHOSPHORUS-OXYGEN AND URANIUM-OXYGEN BONDS

2:45-3:00   

Yogesh Manoharan:, Hisham Alzahrani  and Bi Tihi Fortunat Senior Foua

 Seyed Ehsan Hosseini, Turaj Ashuri and John Krohn   

HYDROGEN UTILIZATION IN FUEL CELL VEHICLES

3:00-3:15  Jay Wallace, Ahmad Al Saleemi, Spencer Brazil, and Luke Elrod  Seyed Ehsan Hosseini and John Krohn  

SAE ECO-CAR: ENGINE OPTIMIZATION

3:15-3:30   William Jordan Wright  Seyed Hosseini  

MICRO-SCALE POWER GENERATION BY A THERMOELECTRIC SYSTEM

3:30-3:45  Shelby Hartzell  Bryan D. Rank   PERSONALITY AS A PREDICTOR OF ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT 
3:45 - 4:00   Carley Allen
 

Willy Hoefler, Mack Rainey, Alvin Williams, and Molly Brant

 

EFFECTS OF MINERAL SUPPLEMENTATION ON LIVER MINERAL CONCENTRATIONS AND PREGNANCY RATES IN FALL AND SPRING CALVING CATTLE

4:00 - 4:15   Alex Bowman  

Willy Hoefler, Mack Rainey, and Molly Brant

 

EFFECTS OF MINERAL SUPPLEMENTATION ON COW-CALF PERFORMANCE IN FALL AND SPRING CALVING CATTLE

4:15 - 4:30   

Jordan Jorgensen, and

Jaci Pool
 

Willy Hoefler, Alvin Williams, Mack Rainey,  and Molly Brant

 

MONITORING THE EFFICACY OF DIFFERENT DEWORMINGPROTOCOLS IN NEWLY WEANED CALVES

4:30 - 4:45  Abigail Sanders  

Willy Hoefler, Mack Rainey, and Molly Brant

 

EFFECTS OF TWO DIFFERENT HATCHER BASKET WASH SYSTEMS ON MICROBIAL COUNTS

4:45 - 5:00   Tiffany Timbrook  

Willy Hoefler, Mack Rainey, Alvin Williams, and Molly Brant

 

EFFECTS OF DIFFERENT STAGES OF PROCESSING NEWLY HATCHED CHICKS ON BODY TEMPERATURE

5:00 - 5:15       
5:15 - 5:30      
       

 

  

Twentieth Annual Senior Honors Symposium
 
Thursday, March 14, 2019
Session 1 - Rothwell 138

 

Time Senior Presentation Project Director
9:00-9:15  Carley Allen  PREVALENCE/ORGANIZATION OF CYTAUXZOON FELIS IN KNOWN AND POTENTIAL TICK VECTORS IN ARKANSAS RIVER VALLEY   

Dr. Cynthia Jacobs,

Assoc. Professor of

Biology
9:20-9:35  Madison Craig  THE EFFECT OF SEROTONIN ON SMOOTH MUSCLE REACTIVITY IN MESENTERIC ARTERIES AND CONTROL OF SYSTEMIC BLOOD PRESSURE  

Ms. R Jamie Dalton,

Instructor of Biology

9:40-9:55

 Stephen Bell  AUSTRO-HUNGARIAN WAR AIMS IN WORLD WAR I

Dr. Greg Michna,

Asst. Professor of History 
10:00– 10:15  Maliha Aniqa  NEAR INFRARED-I EMITTING FLUOROPHORE FOR BIOSENSOR APPLICATIONS IN HUMAN SERUM ALBUMIN DETECTION IN RENAL DISEASE  

Dr. Rajib Choudhury,

Asst. Professor of Chemistry
10:20– 10:35  Rebecca Stephenson  THE CAUSES/CONSEQUENCES OF INTERNATIONAL TRADE POLICY IN UNITED STATES  

Dr. Masanori Kuroki,

Assoc. Professor of Economics
10:40– 10:55  Audrey Fox  THE IMPORTANCE OF VISUAL ARTS PROGRAMS  

Mr. David Mudrinich,

Professor of Art
11:00– 11:15  Erin Guerra  MOTHS DRAWN TO POST-BURN REGENERATION OF PRESCRIBED BURNED SITES; LIKE MOTHS TO A FLAME  

Dr. Jorista Garrie,

Asst. Professor of Wildlife Science
 11:20 – 11:35  Keaton Graves  

THE PROGRESSION OF JIM CROW IN ARKANSAS:

1870-1910

 

Dr. James Moses,

Professor of History

 11:40 – 11:55  Malynn McKay  CONTEMPORARY ISSUES IN PHARMACY

 

Ms. R Jamie Dalton,

Instructor of Biology

Biological Sciences

 12:00 – 12:15  Tristan Smothers  BSN STUDENTS’ PERCEPTIONS ON PREDICTOR TESTS AND REMEDIATION FOR NCLEX-RN SUCCESS  

Dr. Cheryl Monfee,

Professor of Nursing
 12:20 – 12:35  Macy Webb  EFFECTS OF ADVERSE CHILDHOOD EXPERIENCES ON RESILIENCY OF COLLEGE STUDENTS  

Dr. Cheryl Monfee,

Professor of Nursing
 12:40 – 12:55  Caitlin Zulfer  TECHNOLOGY USE WITH NURSING STUDENTS: WHICH ONES ARE ACTUALLY USEFUL?

 

Dr. Rebecca Burris,

Professor of Nursing

 1:00 --  1:15  

David Willard,

Samuel  Snodgrass,

Samuel Breeding
 DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION OF AN AIR FLOW BENCH FOR FLUIDS LABORATORY AT ARKANSAS TECH UNIVERSITY  

Dr. Wayne Helmer,

Professor of Mechanical Engineering
       
       

 

 

 

 

 

Twentieth Annual Student Research Symposium

2019 Abstracts

 

 

 

 

 

 

8:00-8:15

 

POTENTIAL WAVES WITH LARGE CURRENT BEHIND THE SHOCK FRONT

Winter Allen, wallen6@atu.edu

Mostafa Hemmati, mhemmati@atu.edu

Department of Physical Science

 

For theoretical investigation of breakdown waves with a significant current behind the wave front, we employ a one-dimensional, steady-state, three-component (electrons, ions, and neutral particles) fluid model with a shock front. Following the shok front there is a thin dynamical transition region of the wave in which the electric field and electron velocity values change drastically and is referred to as the Debye sheath layer or the sheath region of the wave. The basic set of equations employed consists of the equations of conservation of mass flux, momentum, and energy, plus Poisson’s equation. In this study waves propagating in the opposite direction of the electric field force on electrons (anti-force waves - lightning return stroke) are considered only; and the electron gas partial pressure is assumed to be large enough to provide the driving force of the wave.

For breakdown waves with a large current behind the wave front, the set of electron fluid dynamical equations within the sheath region and also the boundary condition on electron temperature need to be modified. We will present the modification of the set of electron fluid dynamical equations for breakdown waves propagating in the opposite direction of the electric field force on electrons.

 

 

8:15 – 8:30

 

 WAVE PROFILE FOR ELECTRON SHOCK WAVES WITH LARGE CURRENT BEHIND THE SHOCK FRONT

Michael Anderson, manderson26@atu.edu

Mostafa Hemmati, mhemmati@atu.edu

Department of Physical Science

 

For fluid dynamical analysis of breakdown waves with a large current behind the wave front, we employ a one-dimensional, steady-state, three-fluid hydro-dynamical representation and assume the wave to be shock fronted. The electric field force on electrons is in the opposite direction of the propagation of the wave; however, the electron gas temperature, and therefore, the electron fluid pressure is assumed to be large enough to sustain the wave motion down the discharge tube.  Such waves are referred as anti-force waves. The complete set of equations describing such waves consists of the equations of conservation of mass flux, momentum and energy coupled with Poisson’s equation.

Inclusion of a current behind the wave front alters the set of electron fluid dynamical equations and also the boundary condition on electron temperature. For a range of wave speeds, we have tried to integrate our modified set of electron fluid dynamical equations through the sheath region of the wave with the largest current values possible. We have been able to integrate our set of equations for speeds considerably less than those detected in lightning return strokes; and also for currents much larger than the usual current range and current values detected during occasional experimental observations.  Successful solutions must meet the expected boundary conditions at the trailing edge of the wave. We will present the wave profile for electric field, electron velocity, electron number density and electron temperature within the Debye sheath layer of the wave.

 

 

 

8:30 – 8:45

 

REFINING EFFICIENT METHODS TO LOCATE LEGACY OIL AND GAS WELLS

 

Jessica Buenrostro (jbuenrostro@atu.edu), Allie Roach (aroach5@atu.edu), Candy Roberts (croberts31@atu.edu), and Hunter Vickers (hvickers@atu.edu)

 

Michael G. Davis (mdavis@atu.edu) and Jason A. Patton (jpatton@atu.edu)

Department of Physical Sciences

 

Arkansas law requires non-producing oil and gas wells to be plugged and cut off 6 feet below the surface for land reclamation. These wells, known as legacy oil and gas wells, have no surface expression and have the potential to leak hazardous material into the environment. Here we report on phase two of our efforts in refining our methodology to locate legacy wells in Pope and Johnson counties. Because the casings are composed of metal, an Overhauser Magnetometer was able to locate several additional wells utilizing the methods developed during phase one of our project during 2017-18.  Our original method was based on a rigid transect across the abandoned well site with 2-meter spacing.  In this phase of our project we were able to confirm that the 2-meter spacing transects successfully identified the locations of the legacy wells; in addition, we determined that a well location could be recognized up to 20 meters away and could be rapidly found with a “random walk” approach, followed by a grid transect with approximately 2-meter spacing.  Magnetic anomalies for located wells in this phase of our project generally range from ~2,000 – 7,000 nanoTeslas (nT), with one well exceeding 12,000 nT above the background measurements.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

8:45 – 9:00

 

DEVELOPMENT OF NORMATIVE DATA FOR TEST OF VARIABLES OF ATTENTION (TOVA)

Grant Collier,  gcollier1@atu.edu

Rodney Roosevelt,  rroosevelt@atu.edu

Behavioral Sciences Department

 

We developed a modified version of a well-established continuous performance attention task - in which the participant must rapidly respond or inhibit response to stimuli- and developed normative data that will permit further study of attention deficit using the adapted task. Attention is the ability to focus and attend to tasks at hand. Attention deficit is characterized by an inability to focus and attend to the tasks at hand. Deficits in attention are associated with impaired academic performance, increased risk of substance abuse, and mental issues including anxiety and depression. Understanding attention deficit is important both scientifically and clinically. Clinical improved understanding of attention deficit would aid health professionals in diagnosing patients more accurately as well as prescribing medications. Improved scientific understanding can further clarify the causes of attention deficit. Improved understanding may lead to advances in how attention deficit is treated. Since the attention task was developed in-house, the normative data from the standard version does not apply, and in order to interpret individual results, normative data for the task had to be developed. To achieve this, 200 students from Arkansas Tech were administered the modified attention task. The variables of mean reaction time, variance of reaction time, and error rate (commission, omission and anticipatory) were investigated and descriptive statistics were produced (means, percentiles and standard deviations). The results of this study provide a foundation in which future studies will use the normative data to compare an individual to the population to determine relative performance and if there is a deficit present or not.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

9:00 – 9:15

 

IMPROVING EFFECTIVENESS OF WATER STERILIZATION PHOTOCATALYSTS

 

Benjamin Justice (bjustice@atu.edu)

Mariusz P. Gajewski (mgajewski@atu.edu)

Department of Physical Sciences

 

The aim of this project is to improve the bactericidal properties of the light-sensitive porphyrins by their chemical metalation.  It has previously been shown that porphyrins efficiently kill bacteria when exposed to light.  Other studies have revealed that the light energy conversion efficiency increases when the porphyrin core is metalated with a metal cation (e.g. Cu, Fe, Zn, etc.).  The porphyrin molecules used in this project show a very high affinity for copper (II) ions, with exceptionally high binding constant, indicating great stability of the copper metalated product.  For these reasons, copper (II) was the ion of choice for the metalation of the porphyrin core.  Synthesis of the porphyrin-Cu (II) complex was successfully accomplished.  Another objective of this project is the redesign of the irradiation chamber.  Charging the current chamber with porphyrins is difficult and time consuming.  Issues with leaking and clogging were also encountered when working with the chamber.  The following parameters were chosen for the design of the new and improved chamber: easy assembly/disassembly, durability, simplicity, and a leak free system.  The new materials chosen for the chamber are acrylic polymer, rubber seals, and a wingnut system of assembly.  Changing the chamber material from glass to acrylic polymer addresses the durability issues. The wingnut system allows the chamber to be assembled and disassembled quickly, as needed, and reduces the time required for removal, cleaning and subsequent charging of the chamber with porphyrins. The new system will be evaluated for antimicrobial properties in subsequent projects

 

 

 

 

 

9:15 – 9:30

 

MICROENVIRONMENT SENSITIVE NEAR-INFRARED EMITTING FLUOROPHORE

 Siddhi R. Patel (spatel7@atu.edu) and Kallie M. Mendenhall (kmendenhall@atu.edu)

Rajib Choudhury (rchoudhury@atu.edu)

Department of Physical Sciences

 

Near infrared emitting  fluorophores offer significant advantages over the conventional blue and green light excitable fluorophores due to low scattering of emission light, good penetration depth, low levels of autofluorescence in biological systems, and less disturbance and photo-damage to cells and living organism. To date, several long-wavelength emitting fluorophores have been designed, published, as well as commercialized for various applications. Whereas each fluorophore has advantages over one another, general limitations of many fluorophores are, they are minimally water soluble and thus aggregate extensively in water. Moreover, tailoring a fluorophore to long-wavelength absorption and emission regime and maintaining sufficient water solubility for biological applications require many challenging synthesis steps.

In this project we have designed, synthesized and characterized one near-infrared emitting water-soluble fluorophore in two easy steps. The emission of the fluorophore can be tuned by the pH of the solution. Incorporation of electron withdrawing groups resulted in two absorptions maxima, which further induced emission in the near infrared region. We have studied photophysical properties and assessed the efficacy of the fluorophore for potential application in Human Serum Albumin sensing. The fluorophore bound strongly with HSA which enabled us to develop calibration graph for quantitative determination of HSA in synthetic urine samples.

 

References

  1. H. Wang, Z. Lu, S. J. Lord, W. E. Moerner, R. J. Twieg, Tet. Lett., 2007, 48, 3471-3474.
  2. R. Choudhury, H. E. Parker, C. M. Cendejas, K. L. Mendenhall, Tet. Lett., 2018, 59, 3020-3025.
  3. J. Fabian. Chem. Rev., 1992, 92, 1197-1228.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

9:30 – 9:45

 

THE EFFECT OF INTERNAL SPEECH ON APPROACH AND AVOIDANCE OF ALCOHOL CUES

Cherysh Rone, and Preston Wilson

Jordan Thibodeaux, jthibodeaux@atu.edu and Rodney Roosevelt, rroosevelt@atu.edu

 

The current project is on the relation between self-talk and attentional bias to alcohol. In a series of experiments, participants are randomly assigned to a self-talk condition as they perform a “dot-probe” attention task, a demanding attention task involving the presentation of alcoholic and non-alcoholic visual stimuli. In the first study, participants in an approach condition (n = 25) will hear and repeat pleasant statements about alcohol consumption (e.g., “Drinking is fun”, “I feel great with alcohol”), while participants in an avoidance condition (n = 25) will hear and repeat statements related to the unpleasant effects of alcohol consumption (e.g., “Drinking means hangovers”, “I feel terrible with alcohol”). Participants will also self-report alcohol consumption habits before the task, as well as self-reported beliefs about the effects of alcohol before and after the task. It is hypothesized that participants in the approach condition will respond faster to probes over alcohol stimuli than participants in the avoidance condition, and that attentional gaze, gathered with an eye-tracking system, will reflect the behavioral response difference between conditions. In addition, this effect may be most true for participants with lower levels of reported alcohol consumption, and self-beliefs may change to more negative after using avoidance statements. Follow-up studies will continue to examine the effects of self-talk on approach and avoidance motivation with alcohol, and pursue self-talk interventions aimed at regulating the psychophysiological intensity of alcohol cues.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

9:45 – 10:00

 

AFM STUDY OF COPPER PLATING

Brad Martsching,  bmartsching@atu.edu

Mathew Young, myoung@atu.edu

Electrical Engineering, Arkansas Tech University

 

Organic solar cells require electrical contacts with low resistance that also provide for low recombination rates at the interface of the contact and donor/acceptor region.  In this study, copper electroplating was investigated for use in an organic solar cell structure.  The plated copper was characterized using a Nanosurf Easy Scan 2 Atomic Force Microscope (AFM).    The AFM results show that the average surface roughness of the plated copper is less than 1 nm with a uniform surface topography.  The Cu contacts will be characterized by fabricating a transmission line structure for extraction of sheet resistance and contact resistance.  This information will better allow for the modeling and characterization of an organic solar cell structure.

 

 

 

 

  

 

 

 

10:00 – 10:15

 

PROPAGATION OF GENERALIZED GAUSSIAN BEAMS IN QUADRATIC INDEX MEDIA

Kevin McDannold, kmcdannold@atu.edu

Jessica Young, jyoung35@atu.edu

Department of Physical Science

 

The shape of a laser can be manipulated by passing it through a Spatial Light Modulator (SLM) that has been programmed to display specific computer-generated holograms.  This method may be utilized to produce a Generalized Gaussian (GG) beam, one of the most general family of laser beam shapes. In free space, a GG beam will maintain its mode shape and phase which was achieved by passing it through the SLM-based hologram.  However, when passed through an optical fiber, the mode’s shape and phase are less stable.  Our intent is to model the changes and then test the model by coupling the SLM-generated GG beam to a Quadratic Index (QI) optical fiber. We will then observe and record the beam profiles upon both entry and exit of the fiber, the results of which will be presented.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

10:15 – 10:30

 

THE EFFECT OF SEROTONIN ON SMOOTH MUSCLE REACTIVITY IN MESENTERIC ARTERIES AND CONTROL OF SYSTEMIC BLOOD PRESSURE

 

Madison Craig – mcraig6@atu.edu

Robin Jaime Dalton – rdalton1@atu.edu

Department of Biological Sciences

 

The focus of the research performed was to investigate if serotonin can potentiate smooth muscle contraction or relaxation in the mesenteric arteries of rats. In previous research, sphyngosylphosphorylcholine (SPC) has been shown to induce muscle contraction in smooth muscle, and similarities between serotonin and SPC have been observed. For this study, the rats were humanely euthanized and subjected to excision of their intestines along with the mesenteric bed. Following careful microdissection, the arteries were mounted in a DMT wire myograph apparatus and two solutions of potassium (K+), 80mM and 25mM, and a solution of 1μM serotonin were introduced. Trials were run, and tension outputs were computed and analyzed. The results show that serotonin does induce reactivity of the smooth muscle found in the arterial walls. The future of this study will be to identify which physiological pathway and mechanism that serotonin follows to potentiate the reactivity. This study will lend physiological knowledge to the medical field and provide a basis for pharmacological advancement by providing new information about pathway-specific vasoconstriction induced by serotonin.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

10:30 – 10:45

 

CLOSETED AND VEILED: HOMOSEXUALITY IN EARLY BRITISH LITERATURE

Brayden Meador, bmeador@atu.edu

Sarah Stein, sstein@atu.edu

Department of English and World Languages

 

Sexuality and its acceptance varies heavily throughout history, shifting from accepted to criminalized, depending on time or place. Today, homosexuality and gender expression are a commonly debated topic even in the most progressive parts of the world, yet in British history, specifically in the 1800’s and prior, there were no terms to differentiate between hetero- and homosexuality. Although there were no terms for homosexuality at the time, English society still heavily condemned the act of homosexuality. From repression comes unique ways to express oneself without being marginalized or persecuted by the society in which one lives. As seen in the gay handkerchief code prominent in the early 1970’s, the LGBT+ community has been notable in finding ways to reach out to the rest of the community without prompting danger unto themselves. This resourcefulness goes back even prior to the 1800’s even when there were not clear linguistic dividers other than ‘sodomite’ between straight and gay people.

This essay looks to explore the influence that the abuse that LGBT+ people suffered had on their self-expression within English society in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. The paper looks at blatant harassment and abuse that fell upon homosexuals as shown in “This is Not the Thing: Or Molly Exalted,” to reveal how homosexuals were forced to ‘closet’ themselves and find loopholes to live their lives happily. Then, based upon William Shakespeare’s many poems and plays with homosexual or homosocial undertones such as “The Damerian Apollo” that use a mask of specific forms of knowledge to disguise stances on the flexibility of sexuality, the essay aims to show that sexuality was commonly hidden under a veil in order to convey an important message for the author without causing issues for the society that they live in.

 

 

 

 

 

 

10:45 – 11:00

 

THE PLAYGROUND KING

 

Tanner Williams - twilliams64@atu.edu

David Eshelman - deshelman@atu.edu

Elementary Education/Theatre

 

The Playground King is a children’s play I wrote in the spring semester of 2017 under the guidance of Dr. David Eshelman. The story revolves around a group of elementary students at Henry Atin Elementary School as they navigate the vast political and social ocean that is the Playground. I wrote this play using inspiration from the political climate at the time, my favorite Shakespearean histories, and my own observations as a student teacher. The subject may be presented outlandishly, but the story and characters are true to life.

 

In my presentation, I will discuss in detail the overall plot of The Playground King. I will present a timeline with a few details of the script development - first ideas, first drafts, revisions, and a private reading presented by Arkansas Tech University. Next, I will show production photos from pre and post production, and an account of my experience being an active playwright during this time. The production was a vast collaboration with designers, directors, actors, insight from my own Elementary Education department, and even input from children in the community. The presentation will also include some accounts from elementary school students that were able to attend the play as a field trip, and notes taken from the KCACTF representatives visit. The final piece of my presentation will be a personal reflection on what I learned writing The Playground King, and how it contributes to the wider world of theatre and education. The collaboration of the two was surprisingly intuitive, and led to a study on Children’s Dramatic Literature, which in turn informs the way I write and teach today.

 

 

 

 

 

  

 

 

11:00 – 11:15

 

DNA EXTRACTION TO SUPPORT SEQUENCING OF AIR PARTICULATE SAMPLES

 

Cameron Zielke, czielke@atu.edu

Geoffery Ecker, gecker@atu.edu

Biology

 

Aerobiology is the discipline concerned with the capture, identification, and quantification of the biological particles present in the Earth’s atmosphere. Quantification of airborne particles has historically used light microscopy quantify and identify captured particles. Sub-familial morphological differences are difficult or impossible to distinguish using light microscopy. With improving methods for DNA extraction; it is now possible to gather the miniscule amount of DNA present in these airborne particles and use it to quantify the particulate genomically. A Hirst volumetric spore trap was used to gather particulate samples using silicon grease over 1 weeks span. DNeasy PowerSoil kits [Qiagen, Germany] were used for our extractions. The kits were calibrated initially using soil and then optimized for use with the pollen trap. Airborne samples were extracted using an initial step of removing the contents from melinex tape into a aqueous solution. These extractions from the airborne particulate samples resulted in a mean of 3.8 ± 0.77 ng/μl with an average of 1.7 ±0.09 (260/280). The yields gathered from the airborne samples were consistent with other studies and enough to proceed with PCR and downstream DNA analysis (Leontidou 2017). Metagenomic tests are planned for further analysis using DNA barcodes (eg. ITS2, rbcL, and matK) to help quantify the amount of particulate present from various plant and fungal taxa. MinION [Oxford Nanopore Technologies, UK] will be utilized for DNA sequencing. Once sequenced the barcode regions will aid in the identification of taxa and can be compared to the light microscopy results.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

11:15 – 11:30

 

THE IMPACTS OF MUTUALITY ON RELATIONSHIP COMMITMENT AND SATISFACTION

Jasmine Thompson, jthompson62@atu.edu

Justin Moss, jmoss12@atu.edu

Department of Behavioral Sciences

 

Relationship research demonstrates that mutuality, a measure of interpersonal closeness, serves a host of beneficial relationship functions. We predicted a positive correlation between mutuality, relationship satisfaction, and relationship commitment. In order to test these hypotheses, we surveyed 100 (72 female) undergraduate students at Arkansas Tech University. Forty-five participants reported their relationship status as single while 55 reported their relationship status as in a relationship (e.g., married, in a committed but not married relationship, or casually dating). Each participant completed a demographics survey, the Inclusion of Other in Self scale (Aron et al., 1992) as a measure of mutuality, and measures of satisfaction and commitment in their current or previous relationship on a scale of 1 to 9. Consistent with predictions, we found statistically significant positive correlations between mutuality, satisfaction, and commitment. These results suggest that increasing interpersonal closeness in relationships may be one way to boost relationship satisfaction and commitment. Future research will test whether manipulating feelings of mutuality increase satisfaction and commitment.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

11:30 – 11:45

 

EIGHTEENTH CENTURY WOMEN IN VISUAL MEDIA

 

Betsie Rodriguez brodriguez2@atu.edu

Sarah Stein sstein@atu.edu

Department of English and World Languages

 

During my most recent semester at Arkansas Tech, I had the opportunity to work on a digital humanities project. For this project, I conducted original research by using the Lewis Walpole Library Digital Archive to explore eighteenth-century depictions of women in England. I looked at William Hogarth’s Noon, James Gillray’s Characters in High Life, and Issac Cruikshank’s Petticoat Interest to provide my own interpretations of the images and show visual documentation of how eighteenth-century women were subject to a society that controlled their minds and bodies. In my research, I included current scholarship that suggests that women are affected by class and by a society run by men for men. My research suggested that clothes served as a way to identify a person as a certain class or profession and could actually serve as a way of masquerading to fit into a different class or profession. Social structures were very divided in Britain; however, women in all groups suffered under a society that was made for men. In this paper, I have used satirical cartoons from this time period, along with scholarship from others in the field to show that women from this era were subject to a society that controlled their minds and bodies through ways of dress, living environment, and profession.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

11:45 – 12:00

 

WOMEN THROUGH THE LENS OF WILLIAM BLAKE

Clara Rorick crorick@atu.edu

Sarah Stein sstein@atu.edu

Department of English and World Languages

 

William Blake, the iconic poet and engraver of the Romantic Age, is known for espousing enlightened views on sexuality through his works. It would seem a practical assumption, then, that he also viewed women and femininity with a similar open mind. However, as I will explore in this paper, some of his depictions of women are unprejudiced and illuminated, while some other depictions are downright negative and derogatory. I have utilized The William Blake Archive, a digital collection of all Blake’s prints, to examine his complex and shifting mindset on femininity. In this paper I will examine three of his artworks: the sixth object in his Book of Thel illustrations, depicting innocence and sexual exploration; the sixth object in Visions of the Daughters of Albion, depicting sexual violence against women; and the ninth object in his illustrations of Paradise Lost, depicting the sexual power of the feminine. Utilizing these objects, as well as three scholarly articles discussing Blake’s views, I come to the conclusion that there is no simple black-and-white description of his perspective. At times, Blake is appreciative of the sexual power women possess, as is the case with his illustration of Eve’s seduction in Paradise Lost; other times, he criticizes them for the passivity he views in them, which is depicted in Thel’s rejection of knowledge and experience in The Book of Thel. Ultimately, although Blake pushed the boundaries and binaries of gender in some ways, in other ways he was a victim and proponent of the sexism of his time.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1:00 – 1:15

 

THE FEMININE NARRATIVE

 

Starlene “Star” Sharp:  sstearman@atu.edu

Virginia Jones: vjones7@atu.edu ;  Alexis Johnson: ajohnson93@atu.edu

Communications

 

I chose the feminine identity as my personal topic of interest because of my epiphany of my own self-concept and what brought me to this point in my life. I have not always had a sense of accomplishment and valued my existence. I have experienced love and loss. I have been a victim of domestic violence and overcome. I have also known agape love and strayed far from that love. Through it all I now know of God’s purpose for me as Ezer Kenegdo. I have been perfectly created and strive to advocate for others who have fell far from grace and seek healing and forgiveness. I believe it is important to recognize the shaping of the feminine identity because of the consequences associated with the misshaping of the feminine identity. From living in domestic abuse, addiction, hyper sexualization, and objectification to the degradation of women and suicidal thoughts and tendencies because of a lack of value and self-worth. It is time to raise our voices and be heard. I believe this body of work can speak for itself and hope that in the end it gives hope and value to women. The elements of this portfolio has a survival tool for domestic violence, a platform for change in the media representation of women, a political platform for rape victim profiling, a film of women’s narratives of Identity of self-concepts within male dominated roles and how they overcome stereotypes, a collection of written feminine narratives, a song of hope and transformation, and a dedication to the Matriarch of my family, a strong, independent and loving leader of faith.  I believe each aspect of this portfolio represents a small piece of the puzzle that is the feminine Identity.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1:15 – 1:30

 

FRIVOLOUS, VAIN, AND INFERIOR TO MEN: VIEWING WOMEN IN EIGHTEENTH CENTURY ENGLAND

 

Meaghan Wilt, mwilt@atu.edu

Sarah Stein, sstein@atu.edu

The Department of English and World Languages

 

In eighteenth century England, gender inequality was an issue that colored everyday life, stemming from the use of the gender binary that was woven into the very threads of the society. The gender binary is a persistent belief system that is characterized by the idea of there being two genders, male and female, that are inherently different from each other, and it results in the idea that males should be held at a higher status, while females should be considered inferior to them, perpetuating a social hierarchy between genders. This belief system can be observed in satirical images published during the eighteenth century. This paper draws on original archival research from the digital archives of the Lewis Walpole Library Images Database. By analyzing the images, “SUCH THINGS ARE,” “Six Old Women Discussing their Cats,” and “Young Ladies,” the paper argues that women were seen as frivolous, vain, and inferior to men. It argues that the images depict a disheartening story of the dehumanization and erasure of women and their voices in eighteenth century England.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1:30 – 1:45

 

APPLICATION OF HYDROGEN IN TRANSPORTATION ENGINES

 

1Brayden Butler, bbutler11@atu.edu

1Hosseini, shosseini@atu.edu, 2Mostafa Hemmati (mhemmati@atu.edu)

1Department of Mechanical Engineering, Arkansas Tech University

2Department of Physical Sciences, Arkansas Tech University

 

Fossil fuels need to be replaced by renewable alternatives before the reserves run out completely.  Hydrogen is an attractive alternative to fossil fuels for applications in the transportation sector due to its high energy density, safety, and ability to produce zero harmful emissions at the tailpipe when used in internal combustion engines and fuel cells. Today most hydrogen is produced unsustainably, but by devoting funding and resources to research and development, alternative renewable production processes have improved hydrogen production in past decade. The transportation sector is the largest emitter of greenhouse gases and contributor to global warming due to the use of petroleum based internal combustion engines. Replacing traditional fossil fuels with sustainably produced hydrogen in the transportation sector would significantly reduce the emissions of greenhouse gases.  For the large-scale implementation of hydrogen fueled vehicles to successfully occur, they must have competitive pricing, driving range, ease of use, and safety features.  There are two ways of utilizing hydrogen as vehicle fuel: in fuel cells and in internal combustion (IC) engines.  Hydrogen fuel cell vehicles (FCVs) typically use a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell stack to convert hydrogen fuel to electric power.  FCVs produce zero “tailpipe” emissions, with the only product being water.  Hydrogen can be used in IC engines as well.  Existing gasoline fueled IC engines can be converted to use hydrogen as fuel by making slight modifications to the engine.  Hydrogen fueled IC engine vehicles produce less significantly less tailpipe emissions than their gasoline counterparts, including NOx emissions.  For both vehicle engine types, storing hydrogen is a limiting factor.  The storage tanks must be pressurized, cooled, or both to achieve adequate hydrogen storage density. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1:45 – 2:00

 

EFFECTS OF THERMAL RECUPERATION ON THE CHARACTERISTCS OF ASYMMETRIC NON-PRIMIXED MESO-SCALE VORTEX COMBUSTION

 

Evan Owens: eowens@atu.edu

Seyed Ehsan Hosseini: shosseini@atu.edu

John Krohn: Jkrohn@atu.edu

Department of Mechanical Engineering

 

Small-scale combustors are an attractive means of generating power for small devices because of their utilization of highly energy dense fuels. Combustion at these small scales becomes difficult to sustain because of high heat loss due to the large ratio of chamber surface area to volume. A non-premixed vortex flow combustor design is used to prevent flame quenching at these small-scales. In this experimental investigation the effect of thermal recuperation is studied by comparing two asymmetric vortex combustors. Both combustors are of the same dimensions with the only difference being, extended air inlet channels incorporated in one of the designs to allow for thermal recuperation. The investigation is conducted by measuring exhaust gas temperature, combustor wall temperature, and emissions at different equivalence ratios and combustion air mass flow rates. The thermal and emitter efficiencies are compared between both designs. The results show that both emitter and thermal efficiency is increased by the use of thermal recuperation and an increasing trend between combustor wall temperature and combustion air mass flow rate is identified in both designs. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2:00 – 2:15

 

BIOGAS DIGESTER WITH FILTRATION

 

Garrison Phillips (gphillips6@atu.edu), Justin Stroud (jstroud11@atu.edu), Damian Spencer (dspencer4@atu.edu), Alan Mejia (amejiasantana@atu.edu) and Mohammad Alanazi (malanazi4@atu.edu)

Seyed Ehsan Hosseini (shosseini@atu.edu) and John Krohn (jkrohn@atu.edu)

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Arkansas Tech University

 

Fossil fuels remain the main source of electricity production in today's world. This method of producing electricity will not always be available and therefore viable solutions for renewable energy sources should be heavily investigated at this time. Not only can biogas be used as a renewable fuel source, but the uncontrolled release of biogas is harmful to environment because about 60% of biogas is methane and the negative effect of methane on environment is thirty times more harmful than carbon dioxide. Bread and cow manure will be used as feedstock for this biogas digester, at a ratio of 7-10% solid content. The biogas will be filtered of carbon dioxide through the use of a water scrubber. Hydrogen sulfide gas will be filtered by use of iron sulfide reaction method. Clay pellets will be used to remove a portion of vaporized water prior to the iron sulfide reaction. This project collects natural forming methane, a byproduct of anaerobic digestion of organic material.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2:15 – 2:30

 

WEARABLE THERMOELECTRIC GENERATORS: A REVIEW

 

Eric Smith: esmith25@atu.edu

Seyed Ehsan Hossieni: shosseini@atu.edu

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Arkansas Tech University

 

In recent years, electronics demands have progressed towards smaller footprints, less weight, and less power consumption, which has created a focus on micro-scale power generation technologies. The wearable thermoelectric generator (WTEG) has shown great potential for use in this field, as such small scale devices consume little power. While batteries are cheap and reliable sources of power, they have the unavoidable limitation of needing to be changed or charged periodically. Batteries are also usually one of the most massive and heat generating components in many small devices. WTEGs could significantly cut down the size of the batteries required for many devices and in some cases eliminate them altogether. WTEGs also have the distinct advantage of being solid state and maintenance-free. These factors have also made them lucrative options for implantable biomedical devices, which must have surgical procedures performed in order to replace batteries or conduct maintenance. From these possibilities, an enormous amount of research and data have surfaced in a short period of time. This paper contains a review of WTEG technology and its development, including the thermoelectric capabilities of some thermoelectric materials, as well as the true “wearability” of a TEG: if it is too uncomfortable or bulky, it will not be practical for everyday use.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2:30 – 2:45

 

BOND VALENCE – BOND LENGTH CORRELATIONS FOR PHOSPHORUS-OXYGEN AND URANIUM-OXYGEN BONDS

 

Blake Ludwig : bludwig@atu.edu

Kallie Mendenhall : kmendenhall@atu.edu

Franklin D. Hardcastle : fhardcastle@atu.edu

Department of Physical Sciences

 

In 1947, Linus Pauling suggested an empirical exponential dependence between bond valence, s, and bond length R: , where R is the length of a chemical bond having unit valence and b is a fitting parameter. Recently, Pauling’s empirical relationship was derived for the first time, and it was found that the b fitting parameter is simply the average of the single-zeta orbital exponents for the two bonding atoms.  In the present study, we examine the relationship between phosphorus-oxygen and uranium-oxygen bond lengths and their respective bond valences.  By performing a best fit between the literature bond lengths and bond valences (based on Pauling’s electroneutrality principle), Ro, b, and the orbital exponents for uranium and phosphorus were found.  The resulting P-O and U-O bond length – valence formulas can be applied to any phosphate or uranate bond regardless of oxidation state, physical state, or environment.

 

 

 

 

2:45 – 3:00

 

HYDROGEN UTILIZATION IN FUEL CELL VEHICLES

 

Yogesh Manoharan: (ymanoharan@atu.edu), Hisham Alzahrani (halzahrani@atu.edu)

Bi Tihi Fortunat Senior Foua (bfoua@atu.edu)

Seyed Ehsan Hosseini (shosseini@atu.edu), Turaj Ashuri (tashuri@atu.edu) and John Krohn (jkrohn@atu.edu)

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Arkansas Tech University

 

The hazardous effect of the pollutants from the conventional fuel vehicle made scientific world to move towards the environmentally friendly energy sources. Though we have various renewable energy sources the perfect one for using as an energy source for the vehicle is hydrogen. Like electricity, hydrogen is an energy carrier which has ability to deliver incredible amount of energy. Onboard hydrogen storage in vehicle is an important factor that should be considered while designing fuel cell vehicle. Fuel cell is an electrochemical device that can produce electricity by in letting chemical gases and oxidant as a reactant. With anode and electrolyte, the fuel cell split cation and anion in the reactant to produce electricity. Fuel cells use reactant which is not harmful to environment and produce water as a product of the chemical reaction. Reactant gas used in the fuel cell changes according to the electrolyte used. Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) is the suitable fuel cell to use in the vehicle because it uses hydrogen as the reactant to produce electricity. As Hydrogen is one of the most efficient energy carrier, the fuel cell can produce DC power to run the electric car. By integrating hydrogen fuel cell with the batteries and control system with strategies together make a sustainable hybrid car.  

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

3:00 – 3:15

 

SAE ECO-CAR: ENGINE OPTIMIZATION

 

Jay Wallace: jwallace20@atu.edu, Ahmad Al Saleemi: aalsaleemi@atu.edu, Spencer Brazil: sbrazil@atu.edu, Luke Elrod: lelrod@atu.edu

Seyed Ehsan Hosseini: shosseini@atu.edu and John Krohn: jkrohn@atu.edu

Department of Mechanical Engineering

 

This research encompasses working with the Arkansas Tech University chapter of the Society of Automotive Engineers to redesign a more optimal engine for use in the Shell Eco-marathon competition. The goal is to, while holding the input work constant, increase the overall output power of the engine. This is performed by increasing the compression ratio by elongating the strokes of the engine. This research shows that engine optimization is a key to helping society in making more economical and efficient automobiles and more environmentally safe and viable fuel sources for said automobiles. The previous engine had a low air-fuel mixture and a low mileage-per-gallon. Research was aimed at developing an optimally efficient engine that supplied more power with less demand in work (fuel). Specifically, a compression ratio greater than the current engine’s ratio of 8:1 was sought. To get a baseline for our data, the current engine had to be tested on a dynamometer. After each alteration or change in the design of the engine, it is tested several times on the dynamometer to obtain efficiency values for the updated engine. This process of improvements and data analysis is repeated and continued until the engine reaches an overall optimal efficiency value greater than or equal to a 5% increase of the current values. The significance of an increased efficiency in the engine of the ATU SAE car is two-fold. First, the ATU SAE’s Eco-car should be able to perform better in their competitions; the car should be able to go farther and/or faster on lesser amounts of fuel. Second, the results show how engines could be redesigned for an increase in efficiency, use, and/or manufacturability.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3:15 – 3:30

 

MICRO-SCALE POWER GENERATION BY A THERMOELECTRIC SYSTEM

 

William Jordan Wright, wwright9@atu.edu

Seyed Hosseini, shosseini@atu.edu

Department of Mechanical Engineering

 

 This project examines the amount of power generated from a thermoelectric (TE) system that is coupled with a small-scale combustion chamber. The TE system consisted of two TE generators and are used to convert the heat dissipated by two walls of the chamber into electricity. The objective of this project was to maximize the power generated by the TE system and how this system affected the combustion system’s efficiency and equivalence ratio. The temperature difference of each TE generator was monitored along with the electrical output. In addition, heat sinks were installed on the “cold” surface of each of the generators to observe how they affected the generated power

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3:30 – 3:45

 

PERSONALITY AS A PREDICTOR OF ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT

 

Shelby Hartzell – shartzell1@atu.edu

Bryan D. Rank – brank@atu.edu

Department of Agriculture

 

The academic achievement of college students is a concern in higher education. High school grade point average (HSGPA) and ACT score are common measures used to provide an estimate of a student’s ability to be successful in college. However, HSGPA and ACT score may not be the only predictors of academic success. Recently, educators have been interested in how non-cognitive variables (i.e., resilience and self-regulation) influence academic success. The Big Five personality traits may offer a prediction of academic success and persistence to degree completion. The Big Five personality traits are described as Neuroticism, Extroversion, Openness, Conscientiousness, and Agreeableness. These five traits have been shown to be common to all people regardless of their culture, language, or group. The purpose of this study was to determine if any of the Big Five personality traits predict the academic success of college students as measured by overall college grade point average. A web-based questionnaire that included the Big Five Inventory was distributed to all students enrolled in the College of Engineering and Applied Science who were classified as seniors at the beginning of the spring 2019 semester (N=453). Seventy-six students responded to the questionnaire yielding a 16.8% response rate. However, only 71 participants gave usable responses yielding a usable response rate of 15.7%. The cumulative GPA for each respondent was obtained from the college. A check of the assumptions for linear regression revealed that data for cumulative GPA was skewed left. Since these data were skewed the researchers used a generalized linear regression model for data analysis. The model revealed that the Big Five trait of conscientiousness was a significant predictor (p = 0.023, B = 0.081) of cumulative GPA among study participants. It is recommended that faculty develop programs to teach self-regulatory behaviors that are associated with conscientiousness to bolster academic success.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

     

 

3:45 – 4:00

 

EFFECTS OF MINERAL SUPPLEMENTATION ON LIVER MINERAL CONCENTRATIONS AND PREGNANCY RATES IN FALL AND SPRING CALVING CATTLE

            Carley Allen, callen@atu.edu

 

Willy Hoefler, whoefler@atu.edu

Mack Rainey, mraineyjr@atu.edu

Alvin Williams, awilliams37@atu.edu

Molly Brant, mbrant@atu.edu

 

Department of Agriculture

 

 

The objective of this study was to examine the effect of trace mineral supplementation and source, on mineral status and reproductive performance of grazing beef cattle. One hundred and forty crossbred cows were assigned to either a spring or fall calving group based on their predictive calving dates. Cows in each calving group were then randomly assigned to one of four treatment groups.  Treatment 1 = fall calving organic mineral supplement, Treatment 2 = fall calving inorganic mineral supplement, Treatment 3 = spring calving organic mineral supplement, and Treatment 4 = spring calving inorganic mineral supplement. To examine mineral status, liver biopsies were obtained from a subset of cows (8 per treatment group) at the beginning (day 0), the end of year one (day 260), with an additional sample taken at the end of year two (day 720). Minerals examined included copper, selenium, and zinc. Effects of mineral supplementation on reproductive performance were also examined. Cows were artificially inseminated (AI) following a modified Select-Sync version of estrous synchronization. To allow for accurate differentiation between pregnancy to AI vs pregnancy to natural service, cows were not be exposed to bulls until 14 days after insemination. To determine pregnancy rates to AI vs natural service, pregnancy was determined via rectal palpation 40 days after insemination. Final pregnancy was determined via rectal palpation 40 days after bull removal. Liver levels of copper did not differ (P>.05) across treatment groups regardless of sample date. Levels of selenium did not differ across treatments on day 0 and day 720. However, selenium levels were lower (P<.05) on day 360 in treatment 4 when compared to treatments 1 and 3. Pregnancy rates were higher in treatments 1 and 2 compared to treatment 3 during year 1. At the end of year 2, pregnancy rates did not differ among treatments 1, 2, and 3 and were higher compared to treatment 4.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

 

 

4:00 – 4:15

 

 

EFFECTS OF MINERAL SUPPLEMENTATION ON COW-CALF PERFORMANCE IN FALL AND SPRING CALVING CATTLE

 

Alex Bowman, pbowman1@atu.edu

 

Willy Hoefler, whoeflerjr@atu.edu

Mack Rainey, mrainey@atu.edu

Molly Brant, mbrant@atu.edu

 

Department of Agriculture

 

The objective of this study was to examine the effect of trace mineral supplementation and source, on performance of grazing beef cattle. One hundred and forty crossbred cows were assigned to either a spring or fall calving group based on their predictive calving dates. Cows in each calving group were then randomly assigned to one of four treatment groups.  Treatment 1 = fall calving organic mineral supplement, Treatment 2 = fall calving inorganic mineral supplement, Treatment 3 = spring calving organic mineral supplement, and Treatment 4 = spring calving inorganic mineral supplement. Animals were allowed free access to either a standard set of inorganic minerals or a premium set of organic minerals. Animal weights, body condition score (BCS), as well as mineral intake was monitored monthly throughout the two-year trial. All calves were tagged, weighed at birth and at monthly intervals. Weaning weights were adjusted to a 205-day weight. There were no differences (P>.05) in BCS between treatments 1 and 2 during year 1 with the exception of day 150 in which BCS scores were higher (P<.05) in treatment 1 compared to treatment 2. During year 2, BCS did not differ (P>.05) between treatments 1 and 2 except on day 300. When BCS scores were compared between treatments 3 and 4, scores were higher in treatment 4 on days 300, 330 and 360 during year 1. During year 2, there were no differences in BCS between treatments 3 and 4 except for days 180 and 210. During year 1, animal weights were higher (P<.05) in treatment 1 compared to treatment 2 on day 150 only. On days 300, 330 and 360 during year 2, animal weights were lower in treatment 1 compared to treatment 2. Animal weights did not differ (P>.05) between treatments 3 and 4 during years 1 and 2.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4:15 – 4:30

 

MONITORING THE EFFICACY OF DIFFERENT DEWORMINGPROTOCOLS IN NEWLY WEANED CALVES

 

Jordan Jorgensen, jjorensen@atu.edu

Jaci Pool, jpool5@atu.edu

 

Willy Hoefler, whoeflerjr@atu.edu

Alvin Williams, awilliam37@atu.edu

Mack Rainey, mraineyjr@atu.edu

Molly Brant, mbrant@atu.edu

 

Department of Agriculture

 

This study was conducted in cooperation with Merck Animal Health. Thirty-six, five to six-hundred-pound cross-bred calves were randomly assigned to one of four treatment groups. Treatment 1 received a SafeGuard drench containing Fenbendazole at a rate of 2.3 mg/pound of body weight. Treatment 2 received injectable Ivomec containing Ivermectin at a rate of 200 mcg/2.2 pounds of body weight. Treatment 3 received a combination of both SafeGuard and Ivomec at the rates as described for treatments 1 and 2. Treatment 4 served as a control group and did not receive any anthelmintic product. On the day of sampling, animals were restrained in a squeeze chute. Animal weight and fecal samples were taken at 14-day intervals over the 112 day trial. On days of sampling, two fecal samples weighing approximately 10 grams each were obtained from five animals out of each treatment group. Individual fecal samples were placed into labeled zip lock bags, sealed and stored on ice until the samples were taken to the lab for analysis. Once at the lab, samples were stored at 40oF until they could be analyzed for the presence of parasitic eggs. One set of samples was sent off to a commercial lab for analysis while the second set of samples were analyzed in our lab. There were no significant differences (P>.05), in fecal egg counts within treatments regardless of sampling period. Fecal egg counts were below threshold levels (9 eggs/gram) for the first two weeks of the trial with levels of 4.3, 2.3, 2.2, and 2.4 eggs per gram for treatments 1, 2, 3, and 4 respectively. However, by day 28 up to day 70, fecal egg counts were above threshold levels for all treatments with the exception of treatment 1 on day 28. There were no difference (P>.05) in animal weights between treatments on day of the trial. However, the trend was for animal weights to be higher in treatments 1, 2, 3 when compared to treatment 4 throughout the rest of the sampling period.

 

 

 

 

4:30 – 4:45

 

EFFECTS OF TWO DIFFERENT HATCHER BASKET WASH SYSTEMS ON MICROBIAL COUNTS

Abigail Sanders, asanders19@atu.edu

Willy Hoefler, whoeflerjr@atu.edu

Mack Rainey, mraineyjr@atu.edu

Molly Brant, mbrant@atu.edu

 

Department of Agriculture

 

The recently hatched chicks’ umbilicus provides a pathway for the introduction of pathogenic microorganisms.  Consequently, sanitation of hatcher basket is crucial to the future success of the chick. The design of this study was to examine the effects of two hatcher basket wash systems on microbial loads and subsequent 7 d chick mortality. Treatment 1 consisted of a single stage wash system and treatment 2 was a Multi-stage wash system. On sampling days, 10 hatcher baskets randomly selected off the chick processing line were individually swabbed pre-washing. A 5.08 cm2 templet placed in the lower left-hand corner of each hatcher basket ensured accurate sampling. Following pre-wash sampling each basket was labeled, placed into the wash system, and recovered immediately post washing. A second templet placed in the same location as the first and a post wash swab collected. Samples were collected for 10 non-consecutive days. Following each collection day, each swab was plated on a 3M-Petrifilm Count Plate and allowed to incubate for 48 h at 39.44oC. Following incubation, plates were read to determine total plate count (TPC per cm2). There were no significant (P<.05) treatment x time interactions, therefore, overall means per treatment are reported. Prewash TPC in treatment 1 were higher (P<.05) when compared to post wash TPC (993 vs 38, respectively). This was also seen when comparing prewash TPC to post wash TPC in treatment 2 (595 vs 58 respectively). When evaluating across treatment means, there were no differences (P>.05) at either the prewash (993 vs 595) or post wash (38 vs 58). There were no significant differences (P>.05) in 7-day mortality between treatment 1 vs 2 (0.95% vs 1.12%). In conclusion, both wash systems were effective in reducing microbial loads.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4:45 – 5:00

 

EFFECTS OF DIFFERENT STAGES OF PROCESSING NEWLY HATCHED CHICKS ON BODY TEMPERATURE

 

Tiffany Timbrook, ttimbrook@atu.edu

 

Willy Hoefler, whoeflerjr@atu.edu

Mack Rainey, mrainey@atu.edu

Alvin Williams, awilliams37@atu.edu

Molly Brant, mbrant@atu.edu

 

Department of Agriculture

 

The objective of this study was to examine the effects of different stages of processing newly hatched chicks on body temperature. Rectal body temperatures were obtained from 10 chicks per broiler farm at hatching (hatcher) using a Fluke 52ii Thermocouple Thermometer.  An additional body temperature measurement was taken when chicks reach the separator room (separator) and again when they are placed in shipping crates in the chick room. Measurements were taken beginning in October (fall) and continue for 6 consecutive weeks. This process was repeated again in March (spring) and July (summer) to examine seasonal effects on processing.  Since there was a significant (P<.05) season by treatment interaction, treatment temperatures (oC) means will be reported by season.  During the fall chick temperatures at the sorter were higher (40.6, P<.05) when compared to both the hatcher and chick room (40.16 and 40.17, respectively). There were no differences (P>.05) in chick temperatures between the hatcher and chick room (40.16 and 40.17, respectively). When chick temperatures in the spring were evaluated, chick temperatures at the sorter were higher (40.71, P<.05) when compared to both the hatcher and chick room (40.16 and 40.37, respectively). There were no differences (P>.05) in chick temperatures between the hatcher and chick room (40.16 and 40.37, respectively). During the summer, there were no differences (P>.05) among the hatcher, sorter and chick room (40.02, 40.05, and 40.44, respectively). Based on the results from this study, the trend was for chick temperatures to be higher during the sorting process compared to the hatcher or chick room.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5:00 – 5:15