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All Graduate Courses

 


1ATU 5000: New Graduate Student Orientation

Students will increase their understanding and knowledge of resources on campus designed to help them successfully manage the transition to graduate school. In addition, this course assists graduate students with navigating the administrative aspects of graduate student life and gaining insight and appreciation of growth opportunities available to students outside of the classroom.

1ATU 6000: Graduate Assistant Orientation

Students will increase their understanding and knowledge of resources on campus designed to help them successfully manage the transition to graduate school and the associated responsibilities of their graduate assistant position. In addition, this course assists graduate assistants with navigating the administrative aspects of graduate student life and gaining appreciation of growth opportunities available to students outside of the classroom. Completion of the GA handbook acknowledgement and survey are required to complete this course.

ACCT 6093: Special Topics in Accounting

Course offers an in-depth exploration of selected accounting issues affecting business. The primary focus of the course will vary from offering to offering; thus the course may be taken more than once. There is a required research project.

Note: Students are limited to a maximum of six (6) hours of special topics credit.

ACCT 6103: Accounting Analysis

Prerequisite: ACCT 2004 and 2013 with a "C" or better.

This course uses a case-study approach to demonstrate how to evaluate internal business units as well as potential merger and acquisition targets. The case-study approach is also used to refine operational and capital budgeting skills, to teach advanced cost-volume-profit analysis techniques, and to develop an awareness of domestic and global transfer pricing issues for multi-location entities.

$35 per SSCH course fee.

ANTH 5403: Interpretation/Education through Museum Methods

Cross-listed: HIST 5403, MUSM 5403

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor or Department Head.

Museum perspectives and approaches to care and interpretation of cultural resources, including, interpretive techniques of exhibit and education outreach materials, and integrating museum interpretation/ education into public school and general public programming. Class projects focus on special problems for managing interpretive materials in a museum setting. Graduate level projects or papers involve carrying out research relevant to the Museum's mission and relating to current Museum goals.

Note: May not be taken for credit after completion of ANTH 4403, HIST 4403, or MUSM 4403.

ANTH 5853: Music of the World's Peoples

Cross-listed: MUS 5853

A survey of predominantly non-Western world music cultures with attention to sonic structures, musicians, musical instruments, and socio-cultural contexts of music making. Listening emphasized.

Note: Open to students in all majors.

ART 5723: Art History Seminar

Prerequisite: Graduate standing, permission of instructor.

This course will provide an advanced forum for in depth examination and focus of a particular artist, movement, theme or period in art history.

Note: A student can repeat this course, earning a maximum number of six (6) graduate hours of credit

ART 6163: Survey of 20th Century Photography

An investigation of the development of photography as a fine art or commercial art form or as a medium for social documentary. Fine art photography is emphasized with the work of significant advertising, commercial, and documentary photographers also included.

ART 6891: Independent Study

Open to graduate students who wish to pursue individual study or investigation of some facet of knowledge which complements the purpose of the University's graduate program. Students will be required to plan their studies and prepare formal written reports of their findings.

Note: The selected topic may not constitute any duplication of study leading to the accomplishment of a thesis.

ART 6892: Independent Study

Open to graduate students who wish to pursue individual study or investigation of some facet of knowledge which complements the purpose of the University's graduate program. Students will be required to plan their studies and prepare formal written reports of their findings.

Note: The selected topic may not constitute any duplication of study leading to the accomplishment of a thesis.

ART 6893: Independent Study

Open to graduate students who wish to pursue individual study or investigation of some facet of knowledge which complements the purpose of the University's graduate program. Students will be required to plan their studies and prepare formal written reports of their findings.

Note: The selected topic may not constitute any duplication of study leading to the accomplishment of a thesis.

ART 6894: Independent Study

Open to graduate students who wish to pursue individual study or investigation of some facet of knowledge which complements the purpose of the University's graduate program. Students will be required to plan their studies and prepare formal written reports of their findings.

Note: The selected topic may not constitute any duplication of study leading to the accomplishment of a thesis.

BIOL 5064: Evolutionary Biology

Prerequisite: Graduate standing

This course focuses upon the principles and major concepts in evolutionary biology from a historical and contemporary viewpoint. Morphological and molecular evolution, population genetics, systematics, the fossil record, a history of life on earth, macroevolution, adaptation, and applications to species conservation are among the topics examined in the course. Laboratory exercises include analysis of populations and species with molecular techniques, computer investigations, and internet resources.

$40 laboratory fee.

BUAD 6003: Independent Study

Prerequisites: 21 hours must be completed toward the program requirements.

Students will complete an administrative project approved in advance by their advisor. The project must include elements of administration with a subject relevant to the student's program of study. Successful completion of the project will include a professional report and full presentation of the project findings/results. The work may take the form of an internship, a research project or a consulting project.

Note: May be repeated for credit.

BUAD 6093: Special Topics in Business

Prerequisite: Twelve (12) hours must be completed toward the degree requirements.

Course offers an in-depth exploration of selected issues affecting business. The primary focus of the course will vary from offering to offering; thus the course may be taken more than once. There is a required research project.

Note: Students are limited to a maximum of six (6) hours of special topics credit.

BUAD 6103: Research Methods

This course explores the basic methodology used within quantitative and qualitative research. Students will be introduced to the language of research, ethical principles, and methods used in the development of the in research design for primary and secondary data and how research tools can provide an understanding of the business environment.

$35 per SSCH course fee.

BUAD 6903: Industry Analysis

Prerequisite: Completion of 21 hours of the MBA program

Co-requisite: MGMT 6903

The purpose of this course is for the student to apply knowledge of research and analysis methods to a major business industry. The student will work with the instructor to identify an appropriate industry to research and analyze culminating in a major written report. The course includes an oral defense of the project and its conclusions before graduate business faculty.

$35 per SSCH course fee.

BDA 6073: Special Topics

Offered: As needed

Prerequisites: MGMT 6203, BDA 6203, and BDA/MKT 6323

This course offers an in-depth exploration of selected business data analytics topics. The primary topic will vary from offering to offering.

Note: Course may be repeated up to three times if topic varies.

$35 per SSCH course fee.

BDA 6203: Business Information Analysis

Prerequisite: BUAD 2053, PSY 2053, STAT 2163, or STAT 2303 with a "C" or better.

In this course, students will learn to make strategic use of information systems and technology to enhance the survival and success of an organization. They will learn how to use and manage these resources to make data-driven decisions, to create insights to assist in developing strategy, and to align the use of IS/IT with organizational goals.

$35 per SSCH course fee.

BDA 6213: Visualizing Data

Prerequisites: Introduction to statistics course (BUAD 2053, MATH 2163, PSY 2053, or other) and Introduction to MS Office course (BUAD 2003, MS Office Certification, or other).

Students will study ways to develop effective visualizations that are based on the principles cognitive science, graphic design, visual arts, and the visual perception theories. This course develops the ability of student to understand and convey the results of data analysis at the executive level as well as to influence others to act on insights that develop from the analysis of data. The goal of the course is to empower students to identify and illuminate important insights and skillfully display them to improve decision-making. This course covers the use of quantitative analysis and software to create effective displays. The course will advance critical thinking skills because students will be better equipped to evaluate data and eliminate bias from the process of turning data into knowledge. Students will enhance their written and oral communication skills in written reports and presentations of their data visualizations.

$35 per SSCH course fee.

BDA 6323: Applied Predictive Analytics

Cross-listed: MKT 6323

Prerequisite: BUAD 2053, PSY 2053, STAT 2163, or STAT 2303 with a "C" or better.

This course will explore multivariate techniques to analyzing data (e.g. multivariate regression, discriminant analysis, logistic regression, market-basket analysis, forecasting and other analytic techniques). The focus of the course will be providing input for organizational strategic decision-making. As an applied analytics course, emphasis will be on application of predictive analytic techniques explored through conceptual, computational, procedural and computer applications.

$35 per SSCH course fee.

BDA 6343: Advanced Analytics

Prerequisite: BDA 6323

This course will explore advanced analytic techniques such as machine learning and artificial intelligence as well as cluster analysis, decision trees and other advanced statistical techniques. The student will formulate advanced models and explore their use to solve complex business problems.

$35 per SSCH course fee.

BDA 6353: Big Data Strategies

This cutting-edge course delivers sophisticated material in an easy-to-understand, accessible way. Students will learn the foundational knowledge and tools needed to seize the opportunities that big data analytics presents as well as how to align these efforts with the organizational goals and strategies.

$35 per SSCH course fee.

BDA 6363: Analytics Strategy

Prerequisites: BDA 6323 and BDA 6343

This course focuses on management of data analytics activities within an organization. Data identification, acquisition, cleansing, and analysis activities will be discussed as part of an organization's overall data, I.T. and corporate strategy. The course will explore the analytics manager's role in aligning the activities of the analytics function with the organizations data, information and corporate strategy.

$35 per SSCH course fee.

CHEM 6881: Workshop

The workshop will require the equivalency of fifteen clock hours of instruction per credit hour.

CHEM 6882: Workshop

The workshop will require the equivalency of fifteen clock hours of instruction per credit hour.

CHEM 6883: Workshop

The workshop will require the equivalency of fifteen clock hours of instruction per credit hour.

COMM 5003: Human Communication Theory

This communication theory class integrates learning about speech communication in various contexts. It is an in-depth study of contemporary and traditional perspectives of human communication, and synthesizes major concepts in human communication theory development.

Note: May not be taken for credit after the completion of COMM 4003.

COMM 5053: Speech Communication Seminar

A course for both majors and non-majors who want to investigate the relationships between human communication and contemporary social, political, and economic issues.

Note: May not be taken for credit after the completion of COMM 4053 unless the topics differ. May be taken for duplicate credit.

COMM 5063: Organizational Communication

Theories and practices of organizational communication are examined from a critical and historical perspective. Issues related to the personal, relational, cultural, group, business, global, and ethical dimensions of everyday communication practices are analyzed. Includes lecture, discussion, research, and group projects.

Note: May not be taken for credit after the completion of COMM 4063.

COMM 5123: Rhetorical Criticism

This course will provide the principles of rhetorical theories as they have developed throughout history and apply them to the critical analysis of various communication events.

Note: May not be taken for credit after the completion of COMM 4123.

COMM 5153: Persuasive Theory & Audience Analysis

Survey of classical and social science theories of persuasion. Particular emphasis is given to analysis of persuasive strategies, preparation of persuasive appeals, ethics of persuasion, and audience analysis. A consideration of social movements and persuasive campaigns is also included.

COMM 5223: Communication and Gender

This class asks students to think critically about and beyond the categories of "women" and "men." Students will actively contribute to discussions as we explore the intersection of gender with culture in such contexts as the workplace, sports, the media, families, and friendships.

Note: May not be taken for credit after completion of COMM 4223

COMM 6893: Independent Study

Open to graduate students who wish to pursue individual study or investigation of some facet of knowledge which complements the purpose of the University's graduate program. Students will be required to plan their studies and prepare formal written reports of their findings.

Note: The selected topic may not constitute any duplication of study leading to the accomplishment of a thesis.

COUN 6003: School Organization and Leadership for the Counselor

The course will examine how schools are organized and supported from the federal level to the local school. The concepts of leadership and its role at all levels will be a focal part of this study. Students will begin to examine their leadership style and dispositions.

COUN 6011: Instructional Leadership/Counseling

This course will focus on the "hard and soft" skills of instructional leadership, counseling, and micro-counseling. The teaching and learning process will be the focus of student work. Students will learn how to observe and coach for excellence in teaching and learning. The reflective practice model will serve as a basis for theory and skill development.

COUN 6012: Assessment and Appraisal

This course will focus on an in-depth study of norm reference and criterion reference assessments. Group, standardized assessment and individual assessment will be addressed. Student will study assessment techniques, instruments selection, analysis and interpreting assessment data, as well as appropriate ways to report data.

COUN 6113: Action Research and Data Analysis for High Performing Schools

This course will center on the analysis of data with emphasis on student achievement and whole school accountability. Data-driven decision making will be examined. Students will look at research methodologies with a focus on action research and the role of the leader in facilitating action research in the field.

COUN 6133: Principles of Curriculum Development

This course will focus on national, state, and local curriculum standards. Students will gain an understanding of the alignment issues of curriculum, instruction, and assessment as they prepare a curriculum artifact based on the principles of curriculum.

COUN 6143: Organizational Change/Role of School Counselor

This course will examine theories of change looking at research and case studies of first and second order change. Students will gain strategies as leaders of change as schools work to move closer to higher performance. Students will study a current change taking place in a school.

COUN 6152: Professional Portfolio

Students will develop a portfolio organized to provide evidences demonstrating proficiency supporting the standards for Arkansas licensure requirements for counselors. This professional portfolio will be a comprehensive collection of artifacts reflective of the program of study designed to meet the standards for school counselors.

COUN 6202: Ethics and Legal Issues for the School Counselor

This course will prepare school counselors to address the challenge of legal and ethical decisions, while keeping the students' welfare in mind, by abiding by the Code of Ethics set forth by the American School Counseling Association (ASCA) Ethical Standards, as well as the American Counseling Association (ACA) Ethical Standards. The students will gain knowledge of and an understanding for Arkansas school law in dealing with legal issues.

COUN 6213: Developmental Counseling: Theory and Application

This course provides an overview of the basic tenets of life span development and how they relate to school counseling. Developmental Counseling contains a balance of research, theoretical clarity, and practical application as students move through the stages of lifesaving development.

COUN 6224: Counseling Skill Development I

Students will examine basic skills and characteristics involved in becoming effective school counselors; will articulate, practice, and demonstrate basic mastery of these skills and characteristics; will develop a systematic approach to the counseling process; and will assess personal strengths and limitations related to becoming professional school counselors.

COUN 6233: School Counseling Programs

This course will review the basic concepts and principles of elementary, middle, and secondary school counseling programs. Specific focus will be on program accountability, development, and leadership of school-based counseling programs.

COUN 6243: Group Counseling Strategies in the Schools

Students will be expected to draw relationships among the concepts and principles of individual, family, and group counseling and apply that knowledge to a school setting.

COUN 6253: Career Development/Academic Advising

This course prepares school counselors to facilitate the public school's role in career development, through awareness to planning, and decision making within the educational context. A focus is placed on student academic development and advising, as well.

COUN 6263: Teaming, Collaboration, and Advocacy

This course emphasizes the values, knowledge, and skills required for effective advocacy and brokering of services through consultation and collaboration. Use of data to identify needs, remove barriers and mobilize resources from the school and the community in order to increase options for students are primary themes through the course. Special attention is placed on equal access of all students to rigorous educational experiences.

COUN 6302: School Counseling Internship

This course provides graduate students an opportunity to engage in supervised, on-the-job experiences in a school setting. The internship includes scheduled on-campus group supervision designed to provide guidance, analysis, and evaluation of this capstone field experience.

$100 internship fee.

COUN 6303: Counseling Skill Development II

Students will examine intermediate skills and characteristics involved in becoming effective school counselors. Students will articulate, practice, and demonstrate mastery of these skills and characteristics; will develop a systematic approach to the counseling process; and will further assess personal strengths and limitations related to becoming professional school counselors.

COUN 6304: Internship

This course provides graduate students an opportunity to engage in supervised, on-the-job experiences in a school setting. The internship includes scheduled on-campus group supervision designed to provide guidance, analysis, and evaluation of this capstone field experience.

$200 internship fee

COUN 6891: Independent Study

Open to graduate students who wish to pursue individual study or investigation of some facet of knowledge which complements the purpose of the University's graduate program. Students will be required to plan their studies and prepare formal written reports of their findings.

Note: The selected topic may not constitute any duplication of study leading to the accomplishment of a thesis. May be repeated for a maximum of four (4) hours.

COUN 6892: Independent Study

Open to graduate students who wish to pursue individual study or investigation of some facet of knowledge which complements the purpose of the University's graduate program. Students will be required to plan their studies and prepare formal written reports of their findings.

Note: The selected topic may not constitute any duplication of study leading to the accomplishment of a thesis. May be repeated for a maximum of four (4) hours.

COUN 6893: Independent Study

Open to graduate students who wish to pursue individual study or investigation of some facet of knowledge which complements the purpose of the University's graduate program. Students will be required to plan their studies and prepare formal written reports of their findings.

Note: The selected topic may not constitute any duplication of study leading to the accomplishment of a thesis. May be repeated for a maximum of four (4) hours.

CJ 5013: Drugs in Society

Cross-listed: SOC 5013

Prerequisite: BA or BS in Sociology or related field.

This course presents a comprehensive study of the history and prohibition of drugs use in the United States, as well as the effects of drugs on society in the form of crime, prison, and treatment. The main focus of this class is on the history of drug use, how certain drugs become illegal, and the intended and unintended consequences of drug prohibition for communities and society.

DE 5543: Driver and Traffic Education II

Prerequisites: Arkansas Teaching Certificate, valid driver's license, good driving record, or approval of department head.

This course is designed to prepare teachers to organize and teach driver education and traffic safety programs in secondary schools. It includes administration, supervision of personnel, design of facilities, and a research project.

Note: May not be taken for credit after completion of DE 4543 or equivalent.

DE 5613: Driver and Traffic Education I

Prerequisites: Arkansas Teaching Certificate, valid driver's license, good driving record, or approval of department head.

This course is designed to prepare teachers to organize and teach driver education and traffic safety programs in secondary schools. This course provides a survey of materials and methods of instruction plus evaluation of textbooks and in-car training of a student driver.

Note: May not be taken for credit after completion of DE 4613 or equivalent.

Two (2) hours lecture, two (2) hours laboratory.

DYS 5003: Dyslexia and Other Learning Disorders

This course is designed to provide dyslexia specialist candidates an introduction to the field of dyslexia and related learning disorders. This course will focus on an understanding of the science of reading including phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and reading comprehension, as well as concepts of print. A variety of approaches to reading and writing instruction, assessment practices, and issues in reading curriculum development will be addressed with particular emphasis on students with dyslexia and other struggling readers. This class has a 5-hour field work component.

DYS 5013: Foundation of Language and Literacy Development

This course is designed to provide the dyslexia therapist candidates with a deep understanding of the stages of language processing as well as the structure of language, and define and identify factors that contribute to literacy.

DYS 5023: Interpreting and Administration of Assessments for Planning Instruction

This course is designed to provide the dyslexia specialist candidates with a comprehensive view of academic assessments. The course will familiarize the student with an overview of statistical concepts, the basic theories of assessment, interpreting data for instruction, and practicum experience administering academic assessments for planning instruction.

DYS 5033: Professional Learning and Leadership

Professional Learning and Leadership is a course designed to prepare students to serve within a Dyslexia Specialist position with all the incumbent responsibilities. To be able to ethically design, facilitate, lead and evaluate differentiated professional development programs for working with students with Dyslexia based on the most up to date research and policy from the local, state and national levels.

DYS 5043: Structured Language Teaching

Structured language teaching is a course designed to prepare students to design, teach, evaluate, and adjust a variety of multisensory and multimodal approaches that effectively support students diagnosed with dyslexia (reading difficulties).

ECED 6323: Designing Quality Early Literacy Experiences (birth - age 9)

A study of the theory, materials, methods, and instructional techniques applicable to language development and emergent literacy experiences during the early childhood education years - birth through age nine. This course examines developmentally appropriate integrated and interdisciplinary approaches to literacy development encompassing writing, reading, and oral language development of young children in the home and school environment.

ECED 6523: Survey of Research in Early Childhood Education

Prerequisite: EDFD 6003.

Seminar will be based on current interest of students and will serve as means of synthesizing their experiences. An interdisciplinary approach will be taken to exploring current issues and problems in early childhood education, current happenings as they relate to the issues and major research efforts to support programs. A critical review examination and evaluation of investigations, studies, and other research finding which have special significance for early childhood education will be explored. The implications of this research for educational practice will also be considered.

ECED 6603: Psychosocial Development: Infancy, Childhood, Family

Prerequisites: Recent undergraduate/graduate class in child development or permission of instructor.

Social/emotional development in infancy and early childhood and the development of parent-child relationships; developmental sequences in infancy and early childhood in relation to lifespan development issues; impact of various disabilities upon attachment and interaction and upon general family adjustment; methods of promoting optimal psychosocial and family development within the context of cultural variations.

ECON 6093: Special Topics in Economics

Course offers an in-depth exploration of selected economics issues affecting business. The primary focus of the course will vary from offering to offering; thus the course may be taken more than once. There is a required research project.

Note: Students are limited to a maximum of six (6) hours of special topics credit.

ECON 6103: Managerial Economics

Prerequisite: ECON 2003 with a C or better and ECON 2013 with a C or better.

The course emphasizes data driven analysis of domestic and global market demand, surviving in a competitive environment, pricing with market power, analyzing strategic interaction, and optimizing production processes.

$35 per SSCH course fee.

EDFD 6003: Educational Research

Cross-listed: MAT 6003

An introduction to educational research procedures, including formulation of research problems, research designs, data collection, and analysis of data.

EDFD 6043: Principles and Theories of Learning

Cross-listed: MAT 6043

This course introduces teacher candidates to educational psychology as a research oriented discipline and a science of practical application.

EDFD 6053: The At-Risk Child in the School Environment

Cross-listed: MAT 6053

A seminar designed to investigate the characteristics of the at-risk student and to investigate the teaching strategies utilized to meet the needs of the at-risk student in the regular classroom.

EDFD 6063: Educational Assessment

Provides the knowledge base for construction, selection, administration, and interpretation of formal, informal, and alternative forms of student assessment.

EDFD 6313: Principles of Curriculum Development

A study of the elements and principles of curriculum design and construction for teachers at the elementary and secondary school levels. The course considers the theoretical concerns of curriculum planning as well as the activities involved in carrying theory into practice.

EDFD 6403: Social, Historical, and Legal Factors in Education

Cross-listed: MAT 6403

This course examines the study of education and various social groups, including the effects of various societies and educational systems. It also examines the legal factors that must be considered in the educational process.

EDFD 6503: Classroom Behavioral Management

Cross-listed: MAT 6503

A seminar to examine research for sources and types of models available for managing the classroom. Development of classroom management skills and systems by applying human development, learning, teaching, and communication principles. This class will review the research and professional literature on classroom management. It includes a practicum involving field experiences in the public school.

EDFD 6703: Guidance in Education

Designed to provide the classroom teacher with the background knowledge and skills to provide classroom assistance in areas related to the school's guidance program.

EDFD 6881: Workshop

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

The workshop will require the equivalency of fifteen clock hours of instruction per credit hour.

EDFD 6882: Workshop

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

The workshop will require the equivalency of fifteen clock hours of instruction per credit hour.

EDFD 6883: Workshop

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

The workshop will require the equivalency of fifteen clock hours of instruction per credit hour.

EDFD 6991: Project or Thesis Research Continuation

This course allows students additional time to research and compose their capstone project/portfolio.

EDFD 6993: Project in Educational Research

Prerequisite: EDFD 6003 with a C or better.

Study and directed research on a topic selected by the student in consultation with a supervising professor.

EDLD 6002: Administrative Law

This course is an introduction to the legal environment of schools. It focuses on the legal concepts, regulations, and codes that principals must know in order to carry out proper school operations. Special emphasis is given to the implementation of policies, regulations, rules, and procedures in the public schools.

EDLD 6013: School Organization and Leadership

This course is a study of the organization and structure of public schools and the principal's role in connecting people, purpose, and practice. For the final project, students will evaluate an existing school schedule and propose a new master schedule that addresses two areas of concern.

EDLD 6023: Organizational Change

This course is a study of the principles of organizational change and how they relate to educational institutions. For the final project, students will evaluate an existing school program and write a detailed proposal to develop and implement a focused improvement plan that leads to an effective school change.

EDLD 6102: School Finance

This course is an introduction to school finance including funding formulas, accounting techniques, and budgeting. It focuses on the financial concepts that principals must know in order to carry out proper school operations. Special emphasis is given to the implementation of financial policies in public schools.

EDLD 6113: Action Research and Data Analysis

This course will address the theories and practice of research with an emphasis on action research for school improvement. For the final project, the student will gather data from one's school and create a formal action research proposal.

EDLD 6153: Communication with School and Community

This course focuses on developing the knowledge, understanding, and skills necessary to establish strong systems of communication and effective relationships with diverse constituents. For the final project, students will develop a comprehensive school communication plan that addresses the needs of all shareholders.

EDLD 6203: Education and Society: Continuities and Discontinuities

This course will review the history of U.S. education with a focus on the relationship between society and educational systems and their stability. For the final project, students will evaluate an existing school culture, then create a specific improvement plan that is supportive, equitable, culturally responsive, and inclusive of all shareholders.

EDLD 6253: Instructional Leadership

This course focuses on the principal's role as an instructional leader. For the final project, the student will use school data to identify a specific content-area that needs attention, then write a detailed plan for improvement.

EDLD 6303: Technology as an Administrative Tool

The role of technology in improving the education system is the focus of this course. The use of technology by the administrator to improve the quality of education managerially and instructionally is the emphasis of the course.

EDLD 6313: Principles of Curriculum for School Leadership

This course examines the development, implementation, and evaluation of curriculum as it relates to school leaders with a focus on the principal's role in facilitating effective change. For the final project, students will create a master plan for dealing with current or emerging curriculum, instruction, or assessment trends in Arkansas.

EDLD 6352: Physical Environment of Schools

This course focuses on the effects that a school's physical environment has on instructional processes and student learning. It also explores the components of physcial plants that are conducive to and effective for improving instruction and learning.

EDLD 6402: Working with the Marginal Performer

This course focuses on identifying and addressing the characteristics of marginal performance in teachers. It includes an in-depth study of the Arkansas teacher evaluation system (TESS). For the final project, students will apply this system to recommend contract renewal or dismissal for one of two fictional teachers described throughout the course.

EDLD 6551: Administrative Internship

This one-credit hour field experience allows students to apply the theoretical and research-based content of EDLD courses to the practical day-to-day operation of a typical public school. Students will implement the various subsystems of education under the direct mentorship of experienced educational administrators.

There is a $50 internship fee for this course. It may be repeated for a maximum of four (4) credit hours.

EDLD 6552: Administrative Internship

This two-credit hour field experience allows students to apply the theoretical and research-based content of EDLD courses to the practical day-to-day operation of a typical public school. Students will implement the various subsystems of education under the direct mentorship of experienced educational administrators.

There is a $100 internship fee for this course. It may be repeated for a maximum of four (4) credit hours.

EDLD 6554: Administrative Internship

This four-credit hour field experience allows students to apply the theoretical and research-based content of EDLD courses to the practical day-to-day operation of a typical public school. Students will implement the various subsystems of education under the direct mentorship of experienced educational administrators.

There is a $200 internship fee for the course.

EDLD 6891: Independent Study

Open to graduate students who wish to pursue individual study or investigation of some facet of knowledge which complements the purpose of the University's graduate program. Students will be required to plan their studies and prepare formal written reports of their findings.

Note: The selected topic may not constitute any duplication of study leading to the accomplishment of a thesis.

Note: May be repeated for credit.

EDLD 6892: Independent Study

Open to graduate students who wish to pursue individual study or investigation of some facet of knowledge which complements the purpose of the University's graduate program. Students will be required to plan their studies and prepare formal written reports of their findings.

Note: The selected topic may not constitute any duplication of study leading to the accomplishment of a thesis.

Note: May be repeated for credit.

EDLD 6893: Independent Study

Open to graduate students who wish to pursue individual study or investigation of some facet of knowledge which complements the purpose of the University's graduate program. Students will be required to plan their studies and prepare formal written reports of their findings.

Note: The selected topic may not constitute any duplication of study leading to the accomplishment of a thesis.

Note: May be repeated for credit.

EDLD 6991: Professional Portfolio

Arkansas licensure requirements for "Building Level Administrator" require the creation of a professional portfolio that demonstrates proficiency in all required standards. This course is designed to help students understand the process of creating this comprehensive collection of artifacts. Portfolios must be presented to and approved by a faculty portfolio review committee (usually during the final semester).

Note: Students whose presentations are not successful during the scheduled semester must re-enroll for an additional semester in order the complete this requirement.

EDLD 7003: Seminar in Systems Issues

This course focuses on system issues and the resulting development of coherent educational policy for public elementary and secondary schools that unifies purpose. This focus is primarily at the state level, where formal responsibility lies, but it concerns federal and district policy as well as school practice.

EDLD 7013: The Superintendency and Central Office

The scope and function of the central office will be the focus of this course. Theory and practice from the central office/ superintendent's perspective of such areas as superintendent-board relations, public relations, strategic planning, professional negotiation, special programs administration, leadership style, and school climate.

EDLD 7023: School Board Relations

The study of school board-administrator relationships and procedures with emphases on community relations, the politics of education and functioning cohesively as an educational, policy-making group.

EDLD 7033: School Personnel and Business Management

Principles, processes and procedures of school personnel management and business management are probed. Issues and topics investigated include supervision, evaluation, recruitment, staff development, salary and contractual obligations, attendance accounting, APSCN procedures, financial accounting, and property accounting.

EDLD 7113: Seminar in Current Issues

The course will investigate contemporary issues and trends related to educational leadership and examine problems and solutions that are of current concern for school organizations. These issues include school finance alternatives, serving a diverse constituency, meeting individual and group needs, accountability issues, instructional issues including the integration of technology, evaluation of instructional issues, evaluation of programs and personnel, and changing policies at the state and national level.

EDLD 7123: Educational Facilities

This is a study of school facilities and transportation planning and concepts, management and practices. Topics include how to use and maintain present school plants, keeping the board and community informed as to building needs, selecting architects, financing construction, safety and security issues, and developing educational specifications.

EDLD 7133: School Finance for District Level Administration

Economics and school finance: Basic concepts include local, state and federal support of education, the Arkansas State Financial System (APSCN), budgeting and projecting, financing capital items, centralization vs. site-based concepts, fiscal management, auditing, and communicating finance to the board and community.

EDLD 7143: School Accountability Systems

This course probes the essential elements of a monitoring system designed to help schools and districts acquire the information they need to better realize their intentions for improvement, accountability, and school restructuring.

EDLD 7153: District Internship

A field study experience providing the student with an opportunity to synthesize and apply knowledge, and develop and practice administrative skills as they relate to school accountability systems. It applies reflective practice under the direction of a practitioner mentor and a university advisor and focuses on a monitoring system model.

$100 internship fee.

EDLD 7163: Statistical Methods for District Leaders

An introductory study of inferential statistics utilizing parametric and nonparametric procedures to analyze school data.

EDLD 7173: Advanced Legal Issues

This course focuses on the United States Constitution and its effects on due process requirements for public schools. Issues include the relationship of constitutional, statutory and case law to public school districts particularly in these areas of current concern - students' rights and responsibilities, teachers' rights and responsibilities, procedural and substantive due process, and liability.

EDLD 7201: Administrative Internship in District Level Finance

A field study experience providing the student with an opportunity to synthesize and apply knowledge, and to develop and practice administrative skills as they relate to the principles of district level school finance. It applies reflective practice under the direction of a practitioner mentor and a university advisor and focuses on existing state and district level financial practices, resources, and responsibilities.

$50 internship fee.

EDLD 7891: Independent Study

Prerequisite: Ed.S. Program Director Approval.

This Independent Study is open to students pursuing the Ed.S. degree who wish to pursue individual study, investigation or project based research of some facet of knowledge which complements the Ed.S. program of study. Students will be required to plan their program submitting a formal program of study request, prepare written reports throughout the study and present their findings in a formal paper.

Note: A student may take no more than six (6) hours of Independent Study work.

EDLD 7892: Independent Study

Prerequisite: Ed.S. Program Director Approval.

This Independent Study is open to students pursuing the Ed.S. degree who wish to pursue individual study, investigation or project based research of some facet of knowledge which complements the Ed.S. program of study. Students will be required to plan their program submitting a formal program of study request, prepare written reports throughout the study and present their findings in a formal paper.

Note: A student may take no more than six (6) hours of Independent Study work.

EDLD 7893: Independent Study

Prerequisite: Ed.S. Program Director Approval.

This Independent Study is open to students pursuing the Ed.S. degree who wish to pursue individual study, investigation or project based research of some facet of knowledge which complements the Ed.S. program of study. Students will be required to plan their program submitting a formal program of study request, prepare written reports throughout the study and present their findings in a formal paper.

Note: A student may take no more than six (6) hours of Independent Study work.

EDLD 8003: Applied Research

Prerequisites: Admission to Ed.D. program

This course of study facilitates excellence in teaching by exploring contemporary paradigms of educational research with an emphasis on informing thinking and decision-making to address problems in schooling. Skills to be emphasized include conceptualizing real-world problems in an inquiry manner so that information derived from the research literature can be applied to the problem, synthesizing the line of investigation. Seeing the historical perspective of the research and critically judging the worth or quality of the study (internal validity, sampling adequacy). Students will review the literature, develop an inquiry problem, gather and analyze data, and make recommendations to solve the problem.

EDLD 8013: Scholarly Writing

Prerequisites: Admission to Ed.D. program

This course is designed to provide an overview of the literature review as it pertains to the research process and assist students in beginning to create a knowledge base about scholarly writing. Peer and instructor support systems are used in this course to enable student groups to complete a 22-page literature review in preparation for future course requirements. Special attention will be focused about the American Psychological Association (APA) Publication Manual (6th Ed).

EDLD 8023: Quantitative Research

Prerequisites: Admission to Ed.D. program

The focus of this course is the application of quantitative research methodology in the study of educational practice. Emphasis will be placed on study design, data collection, and data analysis using quantitative research methods. The fundamentals of quantitative research will be emphasized. Statistical analyses will be conducted using the SPSS software.

EDLD 8033: Qualitative Research

Prerequisites: Admission to Ed.D. program

This course is intended to build in students' understandings of qualitative research, its theory and methods. As a doctoral-level research course, the material covered will be intended to prepare the student for successful competing of a qualitative doctoral dissertation.

EDLD 8043: Cultural Influences

Prerequisites: Admission to ED.D. program

This course facilitates excellence in leadership by exploring current knowledge and research related to communication that builds positive relationships and community in a global society. Issues discussed include, but are not limited to, socioeconomic, ethnicity, gender, age, and other issues that require courageous communication. An emphasis on the educational leader as will guide the examination of socio-cultural and diversity issues pervasive in communicating and building relationships in a global society. These issues will be examined through an exploration of philosophy, leadership, multicultural, and critical pedagogy. Existing, as well as emergent cultural and societal patterns will be contextualized in terms of leadership in Arkansas, the US, and globally.

EDLD 8053: Ethics and Values

Prerequisites: Admission to Ed.D. program

This course focuses on the ethical administrator, the ethical practice of educational leadership and the ethics of equity and social justice. Specific philosophical approaches and ethical theories will be discussed. Particular attention will focus on ethical leadership practices within a learning community and include field-based exploration.

EDLD 8063: Dissertation I-Proposal Writing

Prerequisites: Admission to the Ed.D. program. Completion of all core doctoral classes.

Students will prepare Chapter 1 - 3 for a dissertation proposal to be presented to the doctoral chair and committee members.

EDLD 8073: Synthesis Seminar

Prerequisites: Admission to Ed.D. program

Integrating, synthesizing, and evaluating major concepts encountered in previous doctoral coursework. This course involves the completion of a student proficiency assessment comprised of a portfolio, synthesis paper and oral presentation. Successful completion is required to apply for candidacy.

EDLD 8083: Dissertation II

Prerequisites: Synthesis presentation and portfolio, and admission to candidacy.

Students will prepare Chapter 1-3 for a dissertation proposal. The proposal will be defended with the doctoral committee. Successful completion is required for advancement to candidacy.

EDLD 8093: Dissertation III

Prerequisites: Synthesis presentation and portfolio, and admission to candidacy. Successful defense of dissertation proposal.

Students will prepare Chapter 1-5 for a dissertation proposal. The candidate will conduct research and complete the dissertation and refine chapters 1-3.

EDLD 8101: Dissertation IV

Prerequisites: Synthesis presentation and portfolio, and admission to candidacy. Successful defense of dissertation proposal.

Dissertation will be completed and defended. Students must maintain continuous enrollment from the time of advancement to candidacy and register for at least three credit hours each semester until successful dissertation defense, not to exceed three years of advancement to candidacy. Minimum number of dissertation credit hours is twelve.

Note: May be repeated for credit.

EDLD 8102: Dissertation IV

Prerequisites: Synthesis presentation and portfolio, and admission to candidacy. Successful defense of dissertation proposal.

Dissertation will be completed and defended. Students must maintain continuous enrollment from the time of advancement to candidacy and register for at least three credit hours each semester until successful dissertation defense, not to exceed three years of advancement to candidacy. Minimum number of dissertation credit hours is twelve.

Note: May be repeated for credit.

EDLD 8103: Dissertation IV

Prerequisites: Synthesis presentation and portfolio, and admission to candidacy. Successful defense of dissertation proposal.

Dissertation will be completed and defended. Students must maintain continuous enrollment from the time of advancement to candidacy and register for at least three credit hours each semester until successful dissertation defense, not to exceed three years of advancement to candidacy. Minimum number of dissertation credit hours is twelve.

Note: May be repeated for credit.

EDMD 5033: Introduction to Instructional Technology

An introductory media and media methods course providing an introduction to: instructional computer utilization; applications of principles of graphic design in the production of audiovisual materials; the application of visual literacy, communications, and learning theory to the selection, evaluation, and use of instructional materials; and the development of mediated units of instruction.

EDMD 5043: Foundations of Online Curriculum Design and Evaluation

This course presents an overview of curriculum development and an introduction to the Instructional Systems Design Model. Participants will learn to design and evaluate curriculum, develop instructional materials, assess student learning and measure instructional outcomes for use in online classes for K -12. Topics include preparation of course outlines and syllabi, development of lessons plans, design of evaluation instruments and an explanation of how learning objectives and evaluation strategies affect the selection of content and materials.

EDMD 5053: Online Course Development with Multimedia

This course will introduce participants to study of the latest techniques and software to enhance the creation and design of online learning courses or programs. This class will present an overview of graphics, audio, video, Flash, and other multimedia used to develop online learning activities. This course will also introduce students to audio and video technologies, general multimedia tools and those specialized in accessing learners with disabilities. Participants will be introducing to the concepts of streaming vs. progressive download vs. download, different multimedia, streaming formats and illustrated audio.

EDMD 5063: Advanced Curriculum Design for the Online Classroom

Prerequisites: EDMD 5033 and MAT 5703 or approval or instructor

This class examines elements of effective instructional design for the online learning environment. Students will learn how to create tailored instructional models based on course objectives, target audience, subject matter content, class management and assessment methods. This course will study the design of effective, reliable assessment techniques and evaluation models for online learning. The course is comprised of three major phases of the design process (Analysis, Design, and Development) that guide students through converting or developing course material for an online course.

Participants in this course will also create a capstone project focusing on their lessons from throughout the entire Teaching Online certificate program. This course will focus on student's progress and practical application to current or prospective work opportunities. Students will work collaboratively with an advisor before submitting their final project.

EDMD 6113: Emerging Technologies for Education and Training

This course is a study of different technologies available for administrative, instructional, and management uses in education and training and focuses on both the current technologies available and those in the adjacent future. Students will explore the affordances provided by these technologies for productivity, skill development, and content creation.

EDMD 6123: Audio in Media

Prerequisite: EDMD 5033 or similar introductory course in instructional technology or by permission of instructor.

A study of the technology of sound and the process of producing sound for media programs. The course covers the principles and equipment of sound, pre- production planning, production processes and post-production editing, and the technology of sound. In addition to the study of the principles of sound production, students will apply theories and principles in the production of media programs through a series of production assignments.

EDMD 6133: Production of Digital Instructional Materials

Prerequisite: EDMD 5033 or approval of instructor

Advanced applications, techniques, and processes involved in the production of instructional materials. Emphasis is placed on the production of completed education and training units using digital images, electronic presentations, and web-based materials.

EDMD 6163: Internet Resources

An introduction to resources available on the Internet as well as the tools needed to navigate within a worldwide network of computers, made up of thousands of autonomous networks which are separately administered.

EDMD 6233: Administration of Media Programs

Prerequisite: Nine (9) hours of graduate study or approval of instructor.

A study of the administrative responsibility involved in the organization, implementation, and operation of comprehensive media programs. Specific areas of study include: planning, budgeting, selection of equipment and materials, computerizing administrative functions, proposal development, and program evaluation. Will include site visits to area media centers and training facilities.

EDMD 6303: Survey of Instructional Technology

A survey of current media research, educational media formats, and utilization of mediated materials in education and training, and the development of instructional programs.

EDMD 6313: Instructional Design and Product Development

Prerequisites: Nine hours of instructional technology courses, including a media production course.

A study of the systematic approach to the design, production, evaluation, and utilization of instructional materials. Using design models and general theoretical knowledge specifications, students will write goals and objectives, identify learner characteristics, conduct task analyses, define learning conditions and instructional events, produce instructional products to meet identified needs, and field test finished products.

EDMD 6333: Instructional Multimedia

A study of the human, persuasive, and communicative elements of the medium of television; the effective use of television in education and training; and the writing, producing, directing, and editing of one-camera and studio television productions.

EDMD 6433: Practicum in Educational Media

An overall view of the field of educational media and instructional technology. Current journals, trends, and authorities in the field will be studied. Students will participate in 120 hours (3 hrs. credit) OR 240 hours (6hrs. credit) of practical work in media centers or training facilities, will visit selected media centers, and will submit a research paper or project on current trends in educational media or instructional technology.

Note: Required of all library media specialist students.

$50 course fee.

EDMD 6436: Practicum in Educational Media

An overall view of the field of educational media and instructional technology. Current journals, trends, and authorities in the field will be studied. Students will participate in 120 hours (3 hrs. credit) OR 240 hours (6hrs. credit) of practical work in media centers or training facilities, will visit selected media centers, and will submit a research paper or project on current trends in educational media or instructional technology.

Note: Required of all library media specialist students.

$100 course fee.

EDMD 6513: Computer Based Instruction

An introduction to the use of the computer as a classroom tool to aid in individual instruction. A survey of existing programs available to support courseware development and use on microcomputers, minicomputers, and mainframes. Hands-on experience in developing an interactive instruction lesson.

Note: May not be taken for credit after completion of COMS 4513/5513 or equivalent.

EDMD 6881: Workshop

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

The workshop will require the equivalency of fifteen clock hours of instruction per credit hour.

EDMD 6882: Workshop

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

The workshop will require the equivalency of fifteen clock hours of instruction per credit hour.

EDMD 6883: Workshop

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

The workshop will require the equivalency of fifteen clock hours of instruction per credit hour.

EDMD 6891: Instructional Technology Curriculum

Open to graduate students who wish to pursue individual study or investigation of some facet of knowledge which complements the purpose of the University's graduate program. Students will be required to plan their studies and prepare formal written reports of their findings.

Note: The selected topic may not constitute any duplication of study leading to the accomplishment of a thesis.

EDMD 6892: Instructional Technology Curriculum

Open to graduate students who wish to pursue individual study or investigation of some facet of knowledge which complements the purpose of the University's graduate program. Students will be required to plan their studies and prepare formal written reports of their findings.

Note: The selected topic may not constitute any duplication of study leading to the accomplishment of a thesis.

EDMD 6893: Instructional Technology Curriculum

Open to graduate students who wish to pursue individual study or investigation of some facet of knowledge which complements the purpose of the University's graduate program. Students will be required to plan their studies and prepare formal written reports of their findings.

Note: The selected topic may not constitute any duplication of study leading to the accomplishment of a thesis.

ELEG 5113: Digital Signal Processing

Prerequisites: ELEG 3123 and 3133.

The study of discrete-time signals and systems, convolution, z-transform, discrete-time Fourier transform, analysis and design of digital filters. Students write software for real-time implementation of selected signal processing algorithms using DSP microcomputer hardware.

Note: May not be taken for credit after completion of ELEG 4113.

ELEG 5133: Advanced Digital Design

Prerequisites: ELEG 2130 and 2134.

A project oriented course in which students develop and test custom digital integrated circuits (IC's). An overview of IC design systems and manufacturing processes is presented. Economics of IC production are discussed. Hardware Description Languages (HDL's) are studied. Students design and implement custom IC's using schematic based entry and HDL's.

Note: May not be taken for credit after completion of ELEG 4133.

ELEG 5153: Communication Systems II

Prerequisite: ELEG 4143.

Continuation of ELEG 4143. Design and analysis of analog and digital communication systems, taking into account the effects of noise. Random variables, random processes, analog and digital communication systems in the presence of noise.

Note: May not be taken for credit after completion of ELEG 4153.

ELEG 5313: Modern Control Systems

Prerequisite: ELEG 4303.

A continuation of ELEG 4303 Control Systems. Topic include: frequency response design, state space analysis, controllability, observability, state space design, robustness and introduction to digital control.

Note: May not be taken for graduate credit after completion of ELEG 4313.

ELEG 5993: Special Problems in Engineering I

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor

An individual or group study in an advanced area of engineering under the direction of a faculty member. May be taught in conjunction with an associated ELEG 4993 section with the same topic.

Note: May not be taken for credit after gaining credit for a 4993 section with the same topic.

Note: May be repeated for credit if course content varies.

ELEG 6103: Power Electronics

Prerequisite: ELEG 4103 or permission of instructor.

The course will cover the following topics: Characteristics of thyristors, sequential switching, triggering and synchronizing circuitry. Conversion and control of electric power, design of electric power controller; rectifiers, converters, inverters, and cycloconverters, controlling techniques for DC and AC machines will be presented.

ELEG 6123: Advanced Semiconductors

Prerequisites: ELEG 3003 and ELEG 4103 or permission of the instructor

An in depth overview of coverage of semiconductor devices and materials. The course presents and examines semiconductor fundamentals required in the operational analysis of microelectronic devices.

ELEG 6133: Introduction to Nanoelectronics

This course is designed to give the graduate student an introduction to the engineering problems and concepts that are involved in electrical and electromechanical devices at the nanoscale. The course will cover the wave properties of matter, quantum mechanics, optical properties of materials, nanolithography, and various nanostructure devices such as field-effect transistors, light-emitting diodes and lasers and nanoelectromechanical devices.

ELEG 6143: Digital Image Processing

Prerequisites: ELEG 3133, ELEG 4113, ELEG 3003 and COMS 2104 or permission of the instructor

The course will cover the following topics: components of digital image processing systems, histograms, point processing, neighborhood processing, image restoration, image segmentation, 2-D discrete Fourier transform, image data compression, color image processing.

ELEG 6153: Statistical Signal Processing

Prerequisites: ELEG 4113, ELEG 3003, COMS 2104 or permission of the instructor

The course will cover the following topics: minimum variance unbiased estimators, Cramer-Rao lower bound, maximum likelihood estimators, Least Squares, Kalman filter.

ELEG 6163: Biomedical Signal Processing

Prerequisites: ELEG 4113 or permission of the instructor

The study, analysis, and implementation of advanced method in signal processing applied to biomedical signals and systems. Engineers working in the biomedical field routinely design and build signal processing algorithms and devices to analysis biomedical signals for diagnostic analysis and prosthetic control. In order to appropriately design systems for biomedical signal processing it is necessary to have a basic understanding of the origin and characteristic of these signals. The course will focus on single dimensional deterministic and random signal processing.

ELEG 6303: Robotics

Prerequisites: ELEG 3133, ELEG 4303, ELEG 3003, COMS 2104 or permission of the instructor

The course will cover the following topics: robotics paradigms, path planning, motion planning, configuration space, potential functions, localization and mapping, sensors and actuators.

ELEG 6881: Special Topics in Engineering

Special topics in engineering relating to current engineering topics not covered in other courses.

Note: May be repeated for credit if course content varies.

ELEG 6882: Special Topics in Engineering

Special topics in engineering relating to current engineering topics not covered in other courses.

Note: May be repeated for credit if course content varies.

ELEG 6883: Special Topics in Engineering

Special topics in engineering relating to current engineering topics not covered in other courses.

Note: May be repeated for credit if course content varies.

ELEG 6884: Special Topics in Engineering

Special topics in engineering relating to current engineering topics not covered in other courses.

Note: May be repeated for credit if course content varies.

ELEG 6891: Independent Study

Prerequisites: Completion of 18 hours toward program requirements and approval of advisor

Students will complete an electrical engineering project approved by their Advisory Committee. The project must include elements of engineering design and project management with a subject relevant to electrical engineering. Successful completion of the project will include a professional report and full presentation of the project findings/results.

Note: May be repeated for credit if course content varies.

ELEG 6892: Independent Study

Prerequisites: Completion of 18 hours toward program requirements and approval of advisor

Students will complete an electrical engineering project approved by their Advisory Committee. The project must include elements of engineering design and project management with a subject relevant to electrical engineering. Successful completion of the project will include a professional report and full presentation of the project findings/results.

Note: May be repeated for credit if course content varies.

ELEG 6893: Independent Study

Prerequisites: Completion of 18 hours toward program requirements and approval of advisor

Students will complete an electrical engineering project approved by their Advisory Committee. The project must include elements of engineering design and project management with a subject relevant to electrical engineering. Successful completion of the project will include a professional report and full presentation of the project findings/results.

Note: May be repeated for credit if course content varies.

ELEG 6894: Independent Study

Prerequisites: Completion of 18 hours toward program requirements and approval of advisor

Students will complete an electrical engineering project approved by their Advisory Committee. The project must include elements of engineering design and project management with a subject relevant to electrical engineering. Successful completion of the project will include a professional report and full presentation of the project findings/results.

Note: May be repeated for credit if course content varies.

ELEG 6895: Independent Study

Prerequisites: Completion of 18 hours toward program requirements and approval of advisor

Students will complete an electrical engineering project approved by their Advisory Committee. The project must include elements of engineering design and project management with a subject relevant to electrical engineering. Successful completion of the project will include a professional report and full presentation of the project findings/results.

Note: May be repeated for credit if course content varies.

ELEG 6896: Independent Study

Prerequisites: Completion of 18 hours toward program requirements and approval of advisor

Students will complete an electrical engineering project approved by their Advisory Committee. The project must include elements of engineering design and project management with a subject relevant to electrical engineering. Successful completion of the project will include a professional report and full presentation of the project findings/results.

Note: May be repeated for credit if course content varies.

ELED 5333: Teaching Reading and Study Strategies in the Content Area

This course is designed to provide pre-service and in-service teachers and administrators with a knowledge of reading factors as they relate to various disciplines. Content of the course includes estimating students' reading ability, techniques for vocabulary, questioning strategies, and developing reading-related study skills.

ELED 6323: Survey of Teaching Reading

A broad overview of the major viewpoints about reading and current approaches to literacy instruction, with emphasis on its socio-psycholinguistic aspects.

ELED 6343: Literacy Assessment and Intervention

Prerequisite: ELED 6323.

A study of current practices in assessing literacy development and providing intervention in identified problems. Emphasis will be placed on interactive procedures to determine and facilitate the use of reading and writing processes.

ELED 6403: Literature for Children and Adolescents

An in-depth study of printed and other types of materials available for use in the elementary grades and middle school. Emphasizes the selection and use of materials to stimulate and improve learning.

ELED 6823: Introduction to Learning Disabilities

A study designed to teach a recognition of behavioral characteristics of children who have perceptual problems. This course also includes information about prescribed referral procedures and gives an overview of diagnostic, and prescriptive instruction.

ELED 6881: Workshop

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

The workshop will require the equivalency of fifteen clock hours of instruction per credit hour.

ELED 6882: Workshop

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

The workshop will require the equivalency of fifteen clock hours of instruction per credit hour.

ELED 6883: Workshop

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

The workshop will require the equivalency of fifteen clock hours of instruction per credit hour.

ELED 6891: Independent Study

Open to graduate students who wish to pursue individual study or investigation of some facet of knowledge which complements the purpose of the University's graduate program. Students will be required to plan their studies and prepare formal written reports of their findings.

Note: The selected topic may not constitute any duplication of study leading to the accomplishment of a thesis.

ELED 6892: Independent Study

Open to graduate students who wish to pursue individual study or investigation of some facet of knowledge which complements the purpose of the University's graduate program. Students will be required to plan their studies and prepare formal written reports of their findings.

Note: The selected topic may not constitute any duplication of study leading to the accomplishment of a thesis.

ELED 6893: Independent Study

Open to graduate students who wish to pursue individual study or investigation of some facet of knowledge which complements the purpose of the University's graduate program. Students will be required to plan their studies and prepare formal written reports of their findings.

Note: The selected topic may not constitute any duplication of study leading to the accomplishment of a thesis.

ELED 6894: Independent Study

Open to graduate students who wish to pursue individual study or investigation of some facet of knowledge which complements the purpose of the University's graduate program. Students will be required to plan their studies and prepare formal written reports of their findings.

Note: The selected topic may not constitute any duplication of study leading to the accomplishment of a thesis.

ELED 6991: Thesis Research

Directed research on a thesis topic. If the six-hour thesis (ELED 6996) has not been completed during the semester(s) of enrollment, the student must register for ELED 6991 during subsequent semesters in which he/she is receiving faculty assistance with the thesis and/or using University library facilities.

ELED 6996: Thesis Research

Directed research on a thesis topic selected by the student in consultation with a supervising professor.

EMHS 5003: Principles and Practice of Disaster Relief and Recovery

Recovery issues are studied in regard to relationships with ethical, medical, economic and environmental considerations. Initial, short-term, and long-term recovery efforts are examined along with group exercises utilizing best practices.

Note: Students who have taken EAM 4003 cannot take EMHS 5003 for credit.

EMHS 5043: Disaster and Emergency Management Ethics

Involves a study of a variety of types of ethical theory (teleological, deontological, distributive theories of justice, natural law), review of specific ethical dilemmas related to disasters, professional ethics, overcoming biases, avoiding discrimination, and developing sensitivity. Detailed ethical case studies will be conducted.

Note: Students who have taken EAM 4043 cannot take EMHS 5043 for credit.

EMHS 5053: Community Management of Hazardous Materials

Addresses chemical properties of hazardous materials and wastes; legal requirements for their handling, storage, transportation, and disposal; and methods for protecting employees, facilities, and the community.

Note: Students who have taken EAM 4053 cannot take EMHS 5053 for credit.

EMHS 5093: Grants

This course will cover the federal grant funding streams used by emergency management at the local, state, and federal levels. Students will learn the strategy behind each grant funding stream, eligibility qualifications, development of grant budgets and justifications. Students will learn the basics of grant writing, budgeting, purchasing, filing for reimbursement, and requirements for audit. Each basic step will be broken down into a series of tasks assigned each week throughout the semester.

EMHS 5103: Critical Infrastructure

Examines the nation's critical infrastructure protection, risk management, and resilience from a policy perspective.

EMHS 5991: Special Problems and Topics

The topics will vary to reflect the dynamic changes in the emergency management discipline.

Note: Students who have taken EAM 4993 must have approval from the Department Head regarding the topic for credit in EMHS 5993.

Note: May be repeated for credit.

EMHS 5992: Special Problems and Topics

The topics will vary to reflect the dynamic changes in the emergency management discipline.

Note: Students who have taken EAM 4993 must have approval from the Department Head regarding the topic for credit in EMHS 5993.

Note: May be repeated for credit.

EMHS 5993: Special Problems and Topics

The topics will vary to reflect the dynamic changes in the emergency management discipline.

Note: Students who have taken EAM 4993 must have approval from the Department Head regarding the topic for credit in EMHS 5993.

Note: May be repeated for credit.

EMHS 6003: Design and Management of Preparedness and Mitigation Systems

Reviews the needs and concepts for well-structured design and management processes for preparedness and mitigation systems in both the public and private sectors utilizing best methods for implementation.

EMHS 6023: Risk and Vulnerability Assessment for Business and Industry

Prerequisites or Co-requisites: EMHS 6063 or consent of instructor.

Covers the hazards and threats that businesses and industry face regarding security, safety, and business continuity. The scope of threats and businesses studied range from local to international. Risk analysis, vulnerability, recovery, and business continuity plans will be examined.

EMHS 6033: Leadership and Management

Prerequisites: Consent of Graduate Program Director or Department Head.

This course is designed to provide the student with the basic principles and elements of leadership and management. Leadership theories and leadership development will be explored. Additionally, the impact of communication on leadership and management will be examined.

EMHS 6043: Contemporary Issues in Emergency Management

Emphasizes and analyzes the practical aspects of problems facing the emergency manager. Topics could include compliance issues with regard to Homeland Security, the National Incident Management System, the National Response Plan and other national initiatives.

EMHS 6053: Advanced Legal Issues in Emergency Management and Homeland Security

Prerequisites: EMHS 6133 or consent of Graduate Program Director or Department Head.

This course involves research, analysis, and discussion of laws that affect emergency management and homeland security. Emphasis will be placed on the legal obligations of the emergency management or homeland security professional.

EMHS 6063: Principles of Emergency Management

This course provides an overview of issues related to emergency management including the history of emergency management, key policy, natural and technical hazards, comprehensive emergency management, and current issues. It examines the role of public, private, and non-governmental organizations in emergency management, future direction of the field, and discusses several practical considerations for emergency managers pertaining to preparedness, response, recovery, and mitigation.

EMHS 6073: Terrorism and Counterterrorism

This course is designed to provide a critical introduction to the subject of terrorism. Students will explore various aspects of terrorism, including the history of terrorism and strategies of dealing with terrorism, leading to a basic understanding of a global phenomenon.

EMHS 6083: Business Continuity Project Management

Prerequisites: EMHS 6063 or consent of instructor

EMHS 6083 is open to Emergency Management graduate students only. The topics will vary to reflect the continual changes in the emergency management field. This course may also serve as an independent study course upon recommendation of the advisor and approval by the dean. Graduate students will be assigned additional readings and projects of concentration to demonstrate a broad understanding of the special problem or topic being investigated or studied.

EMHS 6093: Principles of Homeland Security

This course examines fundamental concepts of homeland security. Topics to be covered include: terrorism; extremism; homeland security agencies; interrelated duties, relationships, roles, and methods used by governmental agencies; individuals responding to agency issues; historical events; and state and national laws that impact the most critical threats.

EMHS 6103: Research Design and Methods

This course is designed to assist students in developing an understanding of the foundations of research including the principles that guide the research process, the elements of research design, how to read and analyze research articles, and how to write a literature review.

Note: May be repeated for credit.

EMHS 6123: Applied Data Analysis

Prerequisites: EMHS 6103 and EMHS 6933 or consent of Graduate Program Director or Department Head.

This course is designed to further students' progress in the research sequences. The student is guided by a faculty member to conduct individual original research including data collection, analysis, interpretation, and reporting of the findings.

Note: May be repeated for credit.

EMHS 6133: Ethical, Legal, and Political Considerations in Emergency Management and Homeland Security

This course examines and applies ethical, legal, political, and social issues in Emergency Management and Homeland Security.

EMHS 6143: Social Vulnerability

This course reinforces understanding on social vulnerability and vulnerable population in relation to hazards and disasters. Students will analyze social, geographical, and cultural factors that put people differently at risk before, during, and after disasters. Students will explore how vulnerability influences the ability to mitigate to, prepare for, respond to and recover from hazards and disasters. Theories and concepts pertaining to social vulnerability are studied, along with social vulnerability and resilience measurement indices. This course also focuses on the interrelated relationship between disaster and development, and examines the importance of reducing liabilities and increasing capabilities to reduce vulnerability. The course emphasizes the importance of social and cultural considerations in emergency management activities to foster disaster resilience.

EMHS 6193: Introduction to International Emergency Management

This course provides students with the study of disaster trends and diverse emergency and disaster management systems and structures that exist throughout the world. Universal principles of global emergency management practice and advances worldwide will be considered. Lessons from disasters will be addressed and political challenges and cooperation between governments and non-governmental organizations (NGOs).

EMHS 6203: Crisis Communications

This course will cover both the theoretical and practical perspectives of crisis communications. Students will learn the importance of an organized approach to dealing with unexpected, crisis situations and the need for clear, concise information communicated effectively.

EMHS 6243: Intelligence in Emergency Management and Homeland Security

This course is an overview of the field of intelligence with an emphasis on understanding the basics of the field and how it is used in actual practice. In an ever-changing world it is critical to understand the basics of information gathering and how it is analyzed to produce actionable results. Students will explore governmental concerns, intelligence operations and the politics of dealing with information for defensive purposes.

EMHS 6253: Information Security for Public Managers

This course is an overview of information security management for a public department and agency. Students will explore governance, determine current state of security, and learn the concepts of IT-risk assessments, IT-risk mitigation, and incident responses in the realm of the public sector.

EMHS 6333: Epidemics and Pandemics

This course introduces students to the history of infectious diseases and their causative agents, emerging and reemerging diseases that lead to epidemics and pandemics, fundamental epidemiological principles, and surveillance and mitigation strategies. Factors such as urbanization, modern transportation systems, environment, and disrupted ecosystems contributing to the emergence of new infectious diseases and the spread of older diseases will be explored. This course will also examine societal responses to disease, public policy considerations, and the emerging threat of bioweapons.

EMHS 6413: Capstone

Prerequisite: EMHS 6103 and 6933.

This individualized course is designed to promote the integration of the core curriculum and practitioner experiences in the Master of Science degree program in Emergency Management and Homeland Security and to help prepare the student for transition to a professional position following completion of the degree.

Note: May be repeated for credit.

EMHS 6423: Professional Practical Experience and Project Development

Prerequisites: EMHS 6063, EMHS 6093, and EMHS 6103 or consent of Graduate Program Director or Department Head.

This course provides students the opportunity to participate in an approved professional experience in support of a practicum research project in the fields of emergency management and homeland security.

Note: May be repeated for credit for a maximum of six (6) hours.

EMHS 6513: Technology for Comprehensive Emergency Management

This course introduces emerging technologies with application to emergency management and homeland security.

EMHS 6543: Geographic Information Systems in Emergency Management and Homeland Security

This course emphasizes both the theoretical and practical aspects of database management, Geographic Information Systems (GIS) modeling and spatial analysis, and decision support systems in emergency management and homeland security. This course aims to integrate these advanced technologies into situational awareness fusion products.

EMHS 6563: Situational Awareness of Environmental Threats

This course provides an overview of basic threats levels as they relates to the emergency management profession. Students will examine; hazardous weather forecast verification and meanings, decisions making processes based on alert status, development of environmental threat teams, utilizations of technology to assess risk, and National Weather Service products. Student teams will participate in labs, table top scenarios, and exercises. Each graduate student will conduct a special (research) project for presentation to the class at the end of the semester.

EMHS 6891: Independent Study

Prerequisite: Permission of advisor who will direct the independent study.

Open to graduate students who wish to pursue individual study or investigation of some facet of knowledge which complements the purpose of the University's graduate program. Students will be required to plan their studies and prepare formal written reports of their findings. The selected topic may not constitute any duplication of study leading to the accomplishment of a thesis.

Note: May be repeated for credit.

EMHS 6892: Independent Study

Prerequisite: Permission of advisor who will direct the independent study.

Open to graduate students who wish to pursue individual study or investigation of some facet of knowledge which complements the purpose of the University's graduate program. Students will be required to plan their studies and prepare formal written reports of their findings. The selected topic may not constitute any duplication of study leading to the accomplishment of a thesis.

Note: May be repeated for credit.

EMHS 6893: Independent Study

Prerequisite: Permission of advisor who will direct the independent study.

Open to graduate students who wish to pursue individual study or investigation of some facet of knowledge which complements the purpose of the University's graduate program. Students will be required to plan their studies and prepare formal written reports of their findings. The selected topic may not constitute any duplication of study leading to the accomplishment of a thesis.

Note: May be repeated for credit.

EMHS 6933: Research I

Prerequisite: EMHS 6103 or consent of Graduate Program Director or Department Head

This course will require students to produce a literature review regarding an approved topic related to emergency management/homeland security. The literature review will be developed into a research proposal or term paper. The topic and design is developed with the approval of a supervising professor.

Note: May be repeated for credit.

EMHS 6943: Master's Thesis

Prerequisites: EMHS 6103, 6123, and EMHS 6933, or consent of instructor.

Students will submit their completed formal master's thesis and successfully complete their oral defense of their master's thesis.

Note: May be repeated for credit.

ENGL 5023: Second Language Acquisition

An introduction to the major theories of language acquisition and their application to the instruction of English language learners.

Note: May not be taken for credit after completion of ENGL 4023 or TESL 5023.

Note: ENGL 5023 may be used toward fulfilling the Arkansas ESL Endorsement.

ENGL 5083: Seminar: English Language

Course content will vary.

Note: May be taken for credit after completion of ENGL 4083 or ENGL 5083 if course content differs.

ENGL 5093: Seminar in Creative Writing

Opportunity for students to refine style and technique in a genre of creative writing.

Note: May be repeated for credit after completion of ENGL 4093 or ENGL 5093 if course content varies.

ENGL 5103: Literary Theory

A study of contemporary critical approaches to literature.

Note: May not be taken for credit after completion of ENGL 4103.

ENGL 5173: Seminar in Film Studies

This course will examine debates within feminist film theory from structuralism and psychoanalysis in the 1970s to the post-colonial theory, queer theory and post-modernism in the 1990s. Analyses of specific films will focus on the cinematic representation of femininity and masculinity, gendered subjectivities within history and culture, and issues surrounding the cinematic apparatus and spectatorship.

Note: May be repeated for credit.

ENGL 5213: American Folklore

A study of the forms and subjects of American folklore; folklore scholarship and bibliography; field work in collecting folklore.

Note: May not be taken for credit after completion of ENGL 4213.

ENGL 5283: Seminar: World Literature

Course content will vary.

Note: May be taken for credit after completion of ENGL 4283 or ENGL 5283 if course content differs.

ENGL 5383: Seminar: American Literature

Course content will vary.

Note: May be taken for credit after completion of ENGL 4383 or ENGL 5383 if course content differs.

ENGL 5483: Seminar: British Literature

Course content will vary.

Note: May be taken for credit after completion of ENGL 4483 or ENGL 5483 if course content differs.

ENGL 5683: Seminar in Gender Studies

Course content will vary.

Note: May be taken for credit after completion of ENGL 4683 or ENGL 5683 if course content differs.

ENGL 5703: Teaching English as a Second Language

An introduction to the principles and methods in teaching English as a second Language.

Note: May not be taken for credit after completion of ENGL 4703 or TESL 5703.

Note: ENGL 5703 may be used toward fulfilling the Arkansas ESL Endorsement.

ENGL 5713: ESL Assessment

An introduction to the tools and procedures for evaluating the language proficiency and development of English language learners.

Note: May not be taken for credit after completion of ENGL 4713 or TESL 5713.

Note: ENGL 5713 may be used toward fulfilling the Arkansas ESL Endorsement.

ENGL 5723: Teaching People of Other Cultures

An introduction to the complex relationship of language and culture and its impact on teaching English language learners.

Note: May not be taken for credit after completion of ENGL 4723 or TESL 5723.

Note: ENGL 5723 may be used toward fulfilling the Arkansas ESL Endorsement.

ENGL 6003: Introduction to English Graduate Study

An exploration of the ideas, methods and resources appropriate to the study of English language and literature.

Note: May not be taken for credit after completion of LA 6013.

ENGL 6013: Modern English Grammar and Usage

Cross-listed: TESL 6013

Investigation of the structure of American English with an emphasis on practical and pedagogical applications.

Note: Cannot be taken for credit after completion of TESL 6013.

ENGL 6023: Composition Theory and Practice.

A study of composition theory, practice, and pedagogy.

ENGL 6033: Rhetoric

A study of the history, theory, and application of rhetoric.

ENGL 6083: Seminar in Linguistics

Course content will vary.

Note: May be taken for credit after ENGL 6083 if course content varies.

ENGL 6213: Topics in Literature

Examination of various topics through the intensive study of selected literature.

Note: May be repeated for credit if course content varies.

ENGL 6283: Literature and Society

A contextual study of selected works designed to explore the ways in which literature reflects and shapes society.

Note: May be repeated if course contents varies.

ENGL 6813: Directed Readings

A study of literary works selected from the M.A. in English Examination Reading List.

Note: May be repeated for credit.

ENGL 6863: TESL Practicum

Prerequisites: ENGL 5703 or TESL 5703 and at least nine hours toward the MA TESOL degree or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 6893 is a structured, advanced methods course, in which students will prepare and implement a series of English lessons, guided by the 12 national ENL (English as a New Language) standards.

ENGL 6881: Workshop

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

The workshop will require the equivalency of fifteen clock hours of instruction per credit hour.

Note: May be repeated for credit.

ENGL 6882: Workshop

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

The workshop will require the equivalency of fifteen clock hours of instruction per credit hour.

Note: May be repeated for credit.

ENGL 6883: Workshop

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

The workshop will require the equivalency of fifteen clock hours of instruction per credit hour.

Note: May be repeated for credit.

ENGL 6884: Workshop

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

The workshop will require the equivalency of fifteen clock hours of instruction per credit hour.

Note: May be repeated for credit.

ENGL 6885: Workshop

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

The workshop will require the equivalency of fifteen clock hours of instruction per credit hour.

Note: May be repeated for credit.

ENGL 6886: Workshop

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

The workshop will require the equivalency of fifteen clock hours of instruction per credit hour.

Note: May be repeated for credit.

ENGL 6891: Independent Study

Open to graduate students who wish to pursue individual study or investigation of some facet of knowledge which complements the purpose of the University's graduate program. Students will be required to plan their studies and prepare formal written reports of their findings.

Note: The selected topic may not constitute any duplication of study leading to the accomplishment of a thesis.

Note: May be repeated for credit.

ENGL 6892: Independent Study

Open to graduate students who wish to pursue individual study or investigation of some facet of knowledge which complements the purpose of the University's graduate program. Students will be required to plan their studies and prepare formal written reports of their findings.

Note: The selected topic may not constitute any duplication of study leading to the accomplishment of a thesis.

Note: May be repeated for credit.

ENGL 6893: Independent Study

Open to graduate students who wish to pursue individual study or investigation of some facet of knowledge which complements the purpose of the University's graduate program. Students will be required to plan their studies and prepare formal written reports of their findings.

Note: The selected topic may not constitute any duplication of study leading to the accomplishment of a thesis.

Note: May be repeated for credit.

ENGL 6894: Independent Study

Open to graduate students who wish to pursue individual study or investigation of some facet of knowledge which complements the purpose of the University's graduate program. Students will be required to plan their studies and prepare formal written reports of their findings.

Note: The selected topic may not constitute any duplication of study leading to the accomplishment of a thesis.

Note: May be repeated for credit.

ENGL 6991: Thesis Research

Prerequisite: Approval of a thesis plan by the Head of the Department of English and the Dean of Graduate College.

Directed Research on a thesis topic selected by the student in consultation with a supervising professor.

Note: May be repeated for credit.

ENGL 6992: Thesis Research

Prerequisite: Approval of a thesis plan by the Head of the Department of English and the Dean of Graduate College.

Directed Research on a thesis topic selected by the student in consultation with a supervising professor.

Note: May be repeated for credit.

ENGL 6993: Thesis Research

Prerequisite: Approval of a thesis plan by the Head of the Department of English and the Dean of Graduate College.

Directed Research on a thesis topic selected by the student in consultation with a supervising professor.

Note: May be repeated for credit.

ENGL 6994: Thesis Research

Prerequisite: Approval of a thesis plan by the Head of the Department of English and the Dean of Graduate College.

Directed Research on a thesis topic selected by the student in consultation with a supervising professor.

ENGL 6995: Thesis Research

Prerequisite: Approval of a thesis plan by the Head of the Department of English and the Dean of Graduate College.

Directed Research on a thesis topic selected by the student in consultation with a supervising professor.

ENGL 6996: Thesis Research

Prerequisite: Approval of a thesis plan by the Head of the Department of English and the Dean of Graduate College.

Directed Research on a thesis topic selected by the student in consultation with a supervising professor.

FIN 6093: Special Topics in Finance

Course offers an in-depth exploration of selected financial issues affecting business. The primary focus of the course will vary from offering to offering; thus the course may be taken more than once. There is a required research project.

Note: Students are limited to a maximum of six (6) hours of special topics credit.

FIN 6103: Corporate Financial Management

This course emphasizes analytical tools and practical applications for responsible corporate management. Topics include: Goals of the firm, Business Ethics, Corporate Governance, Financial Statement Analysis, Forecasting, Debt and Equity Valuation, Capital Structure, Capital Budgeting, and International Managerial Finance.

$35 per SSCH course fee.

FW 5003: Principles of Wildlife Management

Offered: Spring

Prerequisite: A course in ecology or permission of instructor.

Principles of managing wildlife resources with emphasis on population ecology, habitat evaluation and manipulation, wildlife values, and the administration of wildlife resources and resources agencies.

FW 5014: Forest Ecology and Management

Offered: Fall of odd years

Prerequisite: FW (BIOL) 3114.

An in-depth coverage of ecological interactions in forested ecosystems. Lectures cover biotic and abiotic factors that influence development and species compositions of forest stands. Wildlife habitat relationships in forested ecosystems will also be discussed. Laboratories will familiarize students with field techniques and management activities important in the major forest types of Arkansas.

Lecture two hours, laboratory four hours. $40 laboratory fee.

FW 5024: Limnology

Offered: Spring

Prerequisite: A course in ecology.

A study of physical and chemical processes in fresh water and their effects on organisms in lakes and streams. Laboratory sessions and field trips demonstrate limnological instrumentation and methodology.

Lecture two hours, laboratory four hours. $40 laboratory fee.

FW 5034: Advanced Geographic Information Systems Applications

Offered: Spring

Prerequisites: An introductory course in GIS or permission of instructor.

Use of GIS technology in wildlife and fisheries management and research. Emphasis placed on creation, maintenance, and analysis of spatially explicit data.

Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours. $40 laboratory fee.

FW 5054: Waterfowl Ecology and Management

Prerequisites: BIOL/FW 3114 (Ecology) Ecology and management of North American waterfowl and their habitats.

Laboratory exercises will focus on identification, life histories, sex and age determination, and abundance survey methods. Lectures and discussions will cover behavioral ecology, reproductive ecology, winter ecology, harvest management, and habitat management and conservation.

$40 laboratory fee.

FW 5064: Wetland Ecology and Management

Offered: Fall of even years

Prerequisites: A course in ecology or permission of instructor.

An in-depth coverage of wetlands including occurrence, morphology, hydrology, soils, ecology, and regulation. The types of wetlands and their functions are discussed, as are local, state and federal regulations pertaining to their use, management and protection. Laboratory focuses on identification of common wetland vegetation, delineation of wetland boundaries, as well as field techniques and management activities commonly used in Arkansas wetlands.

Lecture two hours, laboratory four hours. $40 laboratory fee.

FW 5103: Human Dimensions of Fisheries and Wildlife Management

Offered: Fall

Prerequisites: BIOL/FW 3114 or permission of instructor.

Exploration of the complex interactions of social, political, institutional, economic and ecological processes that contribute to natural resource use and management. The primary focus is on interactions and conflict resolution among various stakeholders, resource management agencies, and wildlife and fisheries resources. Topics covered include public attitudes and expectations; agency structure and policy; values of fishes, wildlife; and public relations.

FW 5163: Biodiversity and Conservation Biology

Offered: Fall

Prerequisites: A course in ecology or permission of instructor.

The concepts of, processes that produce, and factors that threaten biological diversity are introduced and examined Further emphasis is placed on unique problems associated with small population size, management of endangered species and practical applications of conservation biology.

FW 5881: Advanced Topics

Offered: On demand

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

This course offers special instruction on fisheries and wildlife topics that are not otherwise covered in the curriculum.

Note: The primary focus of the course will vary from offering to offering, thus the course may be taken more than once. This course may be repeated for credit if content is different.

FW 5882: Advanced Topics

Offered: On demand

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

This course offers special instruction on fisheries and wildlife topics that are not otherwise covered in the curriculum.

Note: The primary focus of the course will vary from offering to offering, thus the course may be taken more than once. This course may be repeated for credit if content is different.

FW 5883: Advanced Topics

Offered: On demand

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

This course offers special instruction on fisheries and wildlife topics that are not otherwise covered in the curriculum.

Note: The primary focus of the course will vary from offering to offering, thus the course may be taken more than once. This course may be repeated for credit if content is different.

FW 5884: Advanced Topics

Offered: On demand

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

This course offers special instruction on fisheries and wildlife topics that are not otherwise covered in the curriculum.

Note: The primary focus of the course will vary from offering to offering, thus the course may be taken more than once. This course may be repeated for credit if content is different.

FW 6001: Graduate Seminar in Fisheries and Wildlife Biology

Analysis of current and classical concepts in fisheries and wildlife biology.

Note: The primary focus of this course will vary from offering to offering, thus the course may be taken for credit more than once.

Note: May be repeated for credit.

FW 6002: Research Methods I

Offered: Spring

Prerequisites: A course in statistics.

Methods for literature review, experimental design, and thesis proposal development.

FW 6012: Research Methods II

Offered: Fall

Prerequisites: A course in statistics.

Methods for data analysis and thesis preparation.

FW 6013: Population Dynamics

Offered: Spring

Prerequisites: Courses in ecology, statistics, and calculus, or permission of instructor.

An in-depth analysis of major historical development in the theory, techniques of manipulating, and mathematical modeling of fish and wildlife populations.

FW 6023: Quantitative Fisheries Science

Prerequisites: A course in fisheries management or permission of instructor.

Quantitative principles of fisheries science used in the analysis and interpretation of fisheries data.

FW 6033: Conservation Management Practicum

Offered: Each summer term

Individual student experience in the field of conservation management. The course will include a 2-day on-campus introduction, weekly conferences via distance delivery during the 4-week off-campus experience, and 3 days of on-campus presentations. The practicum cannot be initiated until the student has completed at least 8 graduate-level hours.

FW 6043: Conservation Research Practicum

Offered: Each summer term

Prerequisites: Completion of 8 graduate-level hours

Individual student experience in the field of conservation research. The course will include a 2-day on-campus introduction, weekly conferences via distance delivery during the 4-week off-campus experience, and 3 days of on­campus presentations. The practicum cannot be initiated until the student has completed at least 8 graduate-level hours.

FW 6101: Comprehensive Exam

Prerequisites: Completion of 24 graduate-level hours

Written and oral comprehensive exam that evaluates student knowledge of fisheries and wildlife science and conservation management. The exam is administered after completion of 24 graduate-level hours.

FW 6891: Independent Study

Open to graduate students who wish to pursue individual study or investigation of some facet of knowledge that complements the purpose of the University's graduate program. Students will be required to plan their studies and prepare formal written reports of their findings.

Note: The selected topic may not constitute any duplication of study leading to the accomplishment of a thesis.

Note: May be repeated for credit.

FW 6892: Independent Study

Open to graduate students who wish to pursue individual study or investigation of some facet of knowledge that complements the purpose of the University's graduate program. Students will be required to plan their studies and prepare formal written reports of their findings.

Note: The selected topic may not constitute any duplication of study leading to the accomplishment of a thesis.

Note: May be repeated for credit.

FW 6893: Independent Study

Open to graduate students who wish to pursue individual study or investigation of some facet of knowledge that complements the purpose of the University's graduate program. Students will be required to plan their studies and prepare formal written reports of their findings.

Note: The selected topic may not constitute any duplication of study leading to the accomplishment of a thesis.

Note: May be repeated for credit.

FW 6894: Independent Study

Open to graduate students who wish to pursue individual study or investigation of some facet of knowledge that complements the purpose of the University's graduate program. Students will be required to plan their studies and prepare formal written reports of their findings.

Note: The selected topic may not constitute any duplication of study leading to the accomplishment of a thesis.

Note: May be repeated for credit.

FW 6991: Thesis Research

Research on a topic culminating in a written thesis.

Note: May be repeated for credit.

FW 6992: Thesis Research

Research on a topic culminating in a written thesis.

Note: May be repeated for credit.

FW 6993: Thesis Research

Research on a topic culminating in a written thesis.

Note: May be repeated for credit.

FW 6994: Thesis Research

Research on a topic culminating in a written thesis.

Note: May be repeated for credit.

FW 6995: Thesis Research

Research on a topic culminating in a written thesis.

Note: May be repeated for credit.

FW 6996: Thesis Research

Research on a topic culminating in a written thesis.

Note: May be repeated for credit.

FR 6801: Cultural Immersion and Research

Prerequisite: Enrollment in French Immersion Weekend and permission of instructor.

Intensive study of French cultural topics followed by individual research projects.

Note: May be repeated for credit if content varies.

GEOG 6893: Independent Study

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor or Department Head.

Open to graduate students who wish to pursue individual study or investigation of some facet of knowledge which complements the purpose of the University's graduate program. Students will be required to plan their studies and prepare formal written reports of their findings.

Note: The selected topic may not constitute any duplication of study leading to the accomplishment of a thesis.

GEOL 6881: Workshop

The workshop will require the equivalency of fifteen clock hours of instruction per credit hour.

GEOL 6882: Workshop

The workshop will require the equivalency of fifteen clock hours of instruction per credit hour.

GEOL 6883: Workshop

The workshop will require the equivalency of fifteen clock hours of instruction per credit hour.

GEOL 6884: Workshop

The workshop will require the equivalency of fifteen clock hours of instruction per credit hour.

HI 5092: Research in HIM

This course teaches the skills needed to systematically investigate subjects to expand knowledge and generate new ideas. A study of the specific research methodology used in a health information management setting will be explored. Emphasis will be given to hands-on performance of research in conjunction with area health care facilities and agencies. Formal presentation of research will also be a component of the course.

$40 course fee.

HI 6053: Emerging Trends in Health Information Technology

Trends in the health information technology will be identified and discussed. Industry-changing trends will be emphasized as well as regulatory initiatives associated with the changes. The purpose of this course is to provide the student with an awareness of current changes within the field of health information technology, as well as how to keep up with changes as they occur.

$60 course fee.

HI 6063: Leadership in Health Informatics

A study of the leadership skills as applied to an electronic health (e-health) environment. Topics such as the development of strategy, change management, and project management in the context of health informatics will be explored.

HI 6073: Security and Privacy in Health Informatics

An exploration of legal issues as they relate to the collection, storage, retention and sharing of health data and information. Privacy and security will be discussed, from the standpoint of health care entities as well as from the consumer point of view.

$60 course fee.

HI 6083: Health Care Policy

This course investigates the current state of health care, encompassing issues related to health care reform and payment systems. Issues explored include access to care, as well as cost and quality of care rendered. Specific issues in health care policy will be explored.

HI 6983: Research Project

The purpose of this course is to have the student apply knowledge of research methods to an area of the student's interest. This research-based course will allow the student to work with the instructor to identify an appropriate project to be completed at the end of the MSHI coursework. The project should incorporate principles learned in courses leading to this course.

Note: May be repeated for credit.

HI 6991: Thesis Research

The purpose of this course is to have the student apply knowledge of research methods to an area of the student's interest. This course is designed for the student to coordinate with the course instructor to identify a thesis topic or high level project to be completed as a capstone experience. This course should be completed after all other MSHI coursework is completed and will provide the student with an opportunity to utilize the concepts learned in courses leading to this capstone course.

Note: May be repeated for credit.

HI 6992: Thesis Research

The purpose of this course is to have the student apply knowledge of research methods to an area of the student's interest. This course is designed for the student to coordinate with the course instructor to identify a thesis topic or high level project to be completed as a capstone experience. This course should be completed after all other MSHI coursework is completed and will provide the student with an opportunity to utilize the concepts learned in courses leading to this capstone course.

Note: May be repeated for credit.

HI 6993: Thesis Research

The purpose of this course is to have the student apply knowledge of research methods to an area of the student's interest. This course is designed for the student to coordinate with the course instructor to identify a thesis topic or high level project to be completed as a capstone experience. This course should be completed after all other MSHI coursework is completed and will provide the student with an opportunity to utilize the concepts learned in courses leading to this capstone course.

Note: May be repeated for credit.

$60 course fee.

HI 6994: Thesis Research

The purpose of this course is to have the student apply knowledge of research methods to an area of the student's interest. This course is designed for the student to coordinate with the course instructor to identify a thesis topic or high level project to be completed as a capstone experience. This course should be completed after all other MSHI coursework is completed and will provide the student with an opportunity to utilize the concepts learned in courses leading to this capstone course.

Note: May be repeated for credit.

HI 6995: Thesis Research

The purpose of this course is to have the student apply knowledge of research methods to an area of the student's interest. This course is designed for the student to coordinate with the course instructor to identify a thesis topic or high level project to be completed as a capstone experience. This course should be completed after all other MSHI coursework is completed and will provide the student with an opportunity to utilize the concepts learned in courses leading to this capstone course.

Note: May be repeated for credit.

HI 6996: Thesis Research

The purpose of this course is to have the student apply knowledge of research methods to an area of the student's interest. This course is designed for the student to coordinate with the course instructor to identify a thesis topic or high level project to be completed as a capstone experience. This course should be completed after all other MSHI coursework is completed and will provide the student with an opportunity to utilize the concepts learned in courses leading to this capstone course.

Note: May be repeated for credit.

HIST 5023: Vietnam War

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor or Department Head.

A study of the American involvement in Vietnam from 1945 to 1975. Emphasis will rest on the actual period of war in Vietnam.

Note: May not be taken for credit after completion of HIST 4023 or equivalent.

HIST 5123: African American History

Prerequisites: HIST 2003 or HIST 2013.

This course examines the unique role and contribution of African Americans in the overall development of American history from the colonial era to the present. Topics include African societies; black colonial life; the institution of slavery, and African American responses to slavery; the free black community; African American cultural, political, and economic development; issues of assimilation, separatism, and African American responses to institutional racism; the Civil Rights Movement, and recent developments.

Note: May not be repeated for credit as HIST 4123.

HIST 5153: History of Arkansas

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor or Department Head.

A study of the history of the state from Indian times to the present, noting political, social, economic, and cultural trends.

Note: May not be taken for credit after completion of HIST 2153 or HIST 4153 or equivalent.

HIST 5183: American Legal History

This course concerns the history and development of law, legal institutions, and legal culture in the United States from its colonial origins to the present day, with emphasis on the interaction of law with the overall development of American society. Course requires the production of substantial written work based upon disciplined inquiry and the exploration and analysis of primary and secondary sources.

Note: May not be taken for credit after completion of HIST 4183 or equivalent.

HIST 5203: Women in American History

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor or Department Head.

A treatment of women in Western and American social history in their lifestyles and economic and family roles.

Note: May not be taken for credit after completion of HIST 3203 or HIST 4203 or equivalent.

HIST 5223: American Philosophy

Cross-listed: PHIL 5093

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor or Department Head.

An examination of the main currents of American philosophical and religious thought from the earliest times to the present.

HIST 5403: Interpretation/Education through Museum Methods

Cross-listed: ANTH 5403, MUSM 5403

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor or Department Head.

Museum perspectives and approaches to care and interpretation of cultural resources, including, interpretive techniques of exhibit and education outreach materials, and integrating museum interpretation/ education into public school and general public programming. Class projects focus on special problems for managing interpretive materials in a museum setting. Graduate level projects or papers involve carrying out research relevant to the Museum's mission and relating to current Museum goals.

Note: May not be taken for credit after completion of HIST 4403, ANTH 4403, or MUSM 4403.

HIST 5503: History of Christianity

A study of Christianity, from its beginnings to the present day, focusing especially on ancient Mediterranean, medieval European, and modern American Christian traditions. Emphasis will be on the interaction between individual beliefs, group identity, and institutional forces, how each have been shaped by broader social, political and cultural contexts, and finally how these interactions have resulted in profound changes for the Christian religion. Course requires the production of substantial written work based upon disciplined inquiry and the exploration and analysis of primary and secondary sources.

Note: May not be taken for credit after completion of HIST 4503 or equivalent.

HIST 5983: Social Science Seminar

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor or Department Head.

A directed seminar in an area of social sciences. The specific focus will depend upon research under way, community of student need, and the unique educational opportunity available. Course requires the production of substantial written work based upon disciplined inquiry and the exploration and analysis of primary and secondary sources.

Note: Students are limited to a maximum of three (3) hours credit at the graduate level. Subtitle will appear on students' transcripts.

HIST 6003: Historical Methods

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor or Department Head.

General methods of, and approaches to, historical research and writing, including theories, current approaches, problems, and debates. Students will become familiar with basic tools of historical research and professional discipline. Course requires the individual production of a substantial research paper based upon disciplined inquiry and the exploration and analysis of primary and secondary sources.

HIST 6013: Research Seminar in United States History

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor or Department Head.

An investigation of selected topics in American history. Course requires the individual production of a substantial research paper based upon disciplined inquiry and the exploration and analysis of primary and secondary sources. Content varies by semester.

Note: Course may be repeated for a maximum of six (6) hours of credit. Alternate subtitles will appear on students' transcripts.

HIST 6033: Readings in United States History

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor or Department Head.

A readings course in selected topics in American history. Course acquaints students with primary and/or secondary interpretations of the historical period addressed during the semester. Course requires the completion of extensive and wide-ranging reading assignments and the production of substantial written work on the course topic. Content varies by semester.

Note: Course may be repeated for a maximum of six (6) hours of credit. Alternate subtitles will appear on students' transcripts.

HIST 6053: Historiography

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor or Department Head.

Seminar in the analysis of works of important historians from ancient time to the present, with consideration of schools, theories, philosophies, and functions of history. Course requires the completion of extensive and wide-ranging reading assignments and the production of substantial written work.

HIST 6403: Applied Public History

Prerequisite: HIST/ANTH/RP/MUSM 5403 or permission of the department head.

Directed utilization of archives and museums, historical editing and publishing, documentary editing, family and community history, material culture, and historic site interpretation, preservation, and management. Areas of emphasis varies by semester.

Note: The course may be repeated for a maximum of six (6) hours of credit. Alternate subtitles will appear on students' transcripts.

HIST 6413: Research Seminar in Modern European History

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor or Department Head.

An investigation of selected topics in modern European history. Course requires the individual production of a substantial research paper based upon disciplined inquiry and the exploration and analysis of primary and secondary sources. Content varies by semester.

Note: The course may be repeated for a maximum of six (6) hours of credit. Alternate subtitles will appear on students' transcripts.

HIST 6433: Readings in Modern European History

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor or Department Head.

A readings course in selected topics in modern European history. Course requires the completion of extensive and wide-ranging reading assignments and the production of substantial written work on the course topic. Content varies by semester.

Note: The course may be repeated for a maximum of six (6) hours of credit. Alternate subtitles will appear on students' transcripts.

HIST 6533: Research Seminar in World History

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor or Department Head.

An investigation of selected topics in world history. Course requires the individual production of a substantial research paper based upon disciplined inquiry and the exploration and analysis of primary and secondary sources. Content varies by semester.

Note: The course may be repeated for a maximum of six (6) hours of credit. Alternate subtitles will appear on students' transcripts.

HIST 6543: Readings in World History

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor or Department Head.

A readings course in selected topics in world history. Course acquaints students with primary and/or secondary interpretations of the historical period addressed during the semester. Course requires the completion of extensive and wide-ranging reading assignments and the production of substantial written work on the course topic. Content varies by semester.

Note: The course may be repeated for a maximum of six (6) hours of credit. Alternate subtitles will appear on students' transcripts.

HIST 6883: Workshop

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor or Department Head.

Course which allows flexibility of topic, structure, and credit hours to enable faculty to design content according to program needs. Open to graduate students who wish to pursue in-depth advanced projects. Course requires the completion of extensive and wide-ranging reading assignments and the production of substantial written work on the course topic. The workshop will require the equivalency of fifteen clock hours per credit hour.

Note: Students are limited to a maximum of three (3) hours of workshop credit.

HIST 6891: Independent Study

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor or Department Head.

Open to graduate students who wish to pursue individual study or investigation of some facet of knowledge which complements the purpose of the graduate History program. Course requires the completion of extensive and wide-ranging reading assignments and the production of substantial written work on the course topic.

Note: The selected topic may not constitute any duplication of study leading to the accomplishment of a thesis. Students are limited to a maximum of six (6) hours of independent study credit.

HIST 6892: Independent Study

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor or Department Head.

Open to graduate students who wish to pursue individual study or investigation of some facet of knowledge which complements the purpose of the graduate History program. Course requires the completion of extensive and wide-ranging reading assignments and the production of substantial written work on the course topic.

Note: The selected topic may not constitute any duplication of study leading to the accomplishment of a thesis. Students are limited to a maximum of six (6) hours of independent study credit.

HIST 6893: Independent Study

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor or Department Head.

Open to graduate students who wish to pursue individual study or investigation of some facet of knowledge which complements the purpose of the graduate History program. Course requires the completion of extensive and wide-ranging reading assignments and the production of substantial written work on the course topic.

Note: The selected topic may not constitute any duplication of study leading to the accomplishment of a thesis. Students are limited to a maximum of six (6) hours of independent study credit.

HIST 6894: Independent Study

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor or Department Head.

Open to graduate students who wish to pursue individual study or investigation of some facet of knowledge which complements the purpose of the graduate History program. Course requires the completion of extensive and wide-ranging reading assignments and the production of substantial written work on the course topic.

Note: The selected topic may not constitute any duplication of study leading to the accomplishment of a thesis. Students are limited to a maximum of six (6) hours of independent study credit.

HIST 6991: Thesis Research

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor or Department Head.

Directed research on a thesis topic selected by the student in consultation with a supervising professor.

HIST 6992: Thesis Research

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor or Department Head.

Directed research on a thesis topic selected by the student in consultation with a supervising professor.

HIST 6993: Thesis Research

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor or Department Head.

Directed research on a thesis topic selected by the student in consultation with a supervising professor.

HIST 6994: Thesis Research

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor or Department Head.

Directed research on a thesis topic selected by the student in consultation with a supervising professor.

HIST 6995: Thesis Research

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor or Department Head.

Directed research on a thesis topic selected by the student in consultation with a supervising professor.

HIST 6996: Thesis Research

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor or Department Head.

Directed research on a thesis topic selected by the student in consultation with a supervising professor.

HUM 5433: Seminar in Humanities

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor or Department Head

A directed seminar in the Humanities. The specific content will depend on research under way, community or student need, and the unique educational opportunity available.

Note: May be repeated for credit if course content changes.

INFT 5053: Information Systems Resource Management

A study of the principles and concepts involved in the management of information resources including hardware, software and personnel. Includes coverage of departmental functions within computer/ information services as well as legal, ethical, and professional issues, quality management, and strategic impact of information system.

INFT 5103: Software Development

Prerequisite: One year of programming in a high-level language, or a two semester sequence of programming courses.

Techniques for specifying, designing, developing and testing medium-scale software.

INFT 5203: Database Systems

Prerequisite: INFT 5403.

An in-depth study of creating databases in a personal productivity package, including relational database design, generation of customized interfaces, and importing/exporting data to other packages. Survey of applications of personal databases in education and industry.

INFT 5303: Developing and Administering Web Sites

Prerequisite: INFT 5403.

The World Wide Web, Web browser, and web servers. Developing web pages. HTML and HTML editors. Characteristics of a good web site. Installing and configuring web browsers and web servers. Security, screening, and privacy issues.

INFT 5403: Introduction to Information Technology and Systems

Introduction to the infrastructure of information technology and systems. Topics include computer hardware and software, communication and networks, databases, e-commerce technology, design and development of information systems, information security, privacy, ethics, and social impact.

INFT 5413: Computer Systems and Architecture

A study of the fundamentals of system software and computer architecture. The course includes an introduction to the basic foundation of processor operation, memory hierarchy, bus and I/O systems along with their interactions. RISC and CISC instructions sets, fundamental networking terminology and implementation strategies, and an introduction to basic digital logic design.

INFT 5503: The UNIX Operating System

An introduction to the UNIX operating system. Topics to be covered will include the history and philosophy of UNIX systems, an introduction to basic elements of UNIX, the "shell" command interface, utilities for managing files, and an introduction to the functions that administrators perform to maintain or re-establish the reliability of UNIX systems and the tools that UNIX provides to support that activity.

INFT 5700: Computer Networks Lab

Co-requisite: INFT 5703.

Students will complete network lab exercises in support of INFT 5703.

INFT 5703: Computer Networks

Prerequisites: INFT 5403 and INFT 5413.

Study of the concepts involved in interconnecting computers. Introduction to network topologies, routing, protocols, and security. Survey of network operating systems.

INFT 5981: Special Topics

A treatment of subjects not routinely covered in other courses. Subjects will vary.

Note: May be repeated for a maximum of nine (9) hours.

INFT 5982: Special Topics

A treatment of subjects not routinely covered in other courses. Subjects will vary.

Note: May be repeated for a maximum of nine (9) hours.

INFT 5983: Special Topics

A treatment of subjects not routinely covered in other courses. Subjects will vary.

Note: May be repeated for a maximum of nine (9) hours.

INFT 6013: Decision Support Systems

This course enables students to acquire a broad understanding of management information systems and their components and the use of data and analysis models to aid the process of making decisions.

INFT 6203: Database Development and Administration

Prerequisites: INFT 5103 and INFT 5203.

A thorough introduction to accessing and maintaining a database via programming interface. Database administration features of SQL. Installation and tuning of a database.

INFT 6303: Design of Web-Based Information Systems

Prerequisites: INFT 5203 and INFT 5303.

A survey of methods for providing web- based access to data across a network. Common Gateway interface. Use of generation tools for developing web-based forms. Storing form data into a database. Retrieving information from a database and formatting it for presentation through the web and through e-mail. Client-based processing of data. Audio and video mechanisms support.

INFT 6403: Information Systems Analysis and Design

Co-requisite: INFT 5203.

A study of the various concepts, tools, principles, procedures, techniques, and stages of information systems development. Emphasis is placed on the systems approach to problem-solving, user involvement, the management of quality, project control, and teamwork. Other subjects will include feasibility study, requirements definition, documentation, system development life cycle, prototyping, and data modeling.

INFT 6700: Heterogeneous Networks Lab

Co-requisite: INFT 6703.

Students will complete network lab exercises in support of INFT 6703.

INFT 6703: Heterogeneous Networks

Prerequisites: INFT 5503 and INFT 5703.

Networking in a heterogeneous environment.

INFT 6903: Emerging Trends

Prerequisite: Permission of the coordinator.

Study of emerging trends in information technology. Analyzing and reporting on these trends.

Note: May be repeated for a maximum of twelve (12) hours if topic varies.

INFT 6973: Thesis Research in Information Technology I

Prerequisite: Approval of a thesis plan by the thesis committee or the head of the department.

Formal presentation of directed research on a thesis topic selected by the student in consultation with a supervising professor. Prior to the final defense of a written thesis, students will be required to present their research study in a seminar to faculty, staff, and other students.

Note: This course must be continued by taking INFT 6983 in a later semester to complete the entire six (6) hour thesis research.

INFT 6983: Thesis Research in Information Technology II

Prerequisite: INFT 6973.

A continuation of the six-hour thesis research. Students may not enroll in this course with INFT 6991-3 in the same semester. In this course the degree candidate must submit his/her thesis to the thesis committee by the date established by the thesis committee. A final oral defense conducted by the thesis committee must be passed at least three weeks before the degree is conferred.

INFT 6991: Internship

Prerequisite: Approval of a project proposal by the MSIT Graduate Committee or the Instructor.

Students will develop and/or maintain a sponsored computer laboratory or an information system. Duties will include determining user needs, writing and presenting a laboratory or system development/ maintenance plan, and supporting the laboratory or system for a semester. The internship will require the equivalence of four clock hours per week of direct client interaction per credit hour earned.

Note: This course can be repeated up to six (6) total credit hours in different semesters.

INFT 6992: Internship

Prerequisite: Approval of a project proposal by the MSIT Graduate Committee or the Instructor.

Students will develop and/or maintain a sponsored computer laboratory or an information system. Duties will include determining user needs, writing and presenting a laboratory or system development/ maintenance plan, and supporting the laboratory or system for a semester. The internship will require the equivalence of four clock hours per week of direct client interaction per credit hour earned.

Note: This course can be repeated up to six (6) total credit hours in different semesters.

INFT 6993: Internship

Prerequisite: Approval of a project proposal by the MSIT Graduate Committee or the Instructor.

Students will develop and/or maintain a sponsored computer laboratory or an information system. Duties will include determining user needs, writing and presenting a laboratory or system development/ maintenance plan, and supporting the laboratory or system for a semester. The internship will require the equivalence of four clock hours per week of direct client interaction per credit hour earned.

Note: This course can be repeated up to six (6) total credit hours in different semesters.

JOUR 5023: Social Media

This course offers students a solid understanding of social media, its roots, and how to effectively utilize this culture from personal and corporate perspectives.

JOUR 5033: Community Journalism

A course to acquaint the student with the characteristics of journalism as practiced in small towns and cities and study the relationship of the news media to the other institutions of the town or city.

JOUR 5043: Journalism Ethics

A study of ethical theory and basic principles needed in solving ethical challenges facing media professionals.

JOUR 5053: Mass Communication Seminar

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

Studies of the relationship of mass communication to social, political, technical, and economic issues. Course content will vary.

Note: May be repeated for credit as JOUR 5053 when course content changes.

JOUR 5073: Graphic Communication

Presents the elements of effective print design as well as the other decision making processes involved with creating an effective visual communication (type, art and illustration, basic design principles, paper and ink, printing processes, etc.). Students will create visually appealing projects using the industry standard design and photo manipulation software programs.

JOUR 5083: Internet Communication

A study of communication processes in the Digital Age. Discussions and content will include contemporary emerging communication technologies and exploration into the impact those technologies have and will likely have on an individual and diverse social communities.

JOUR 5113: History of American Journalism

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

A survey of the history of American journalism and mass media and their relationships to technical, economic, political, and other aspects of American society.

Note: May not be taken for credit after completion of JOUR 4113 or equivalent.

JOUR 5123: Laws of Communication

This course will familiarize the student with legal knowledge necessary for a communication specialist or working journalist. The course will attempt to identify case and statute law. It will also include in-depth research in particular legal matters.

Note: May not be taken for credit after completion of JOUR 4123, or equivalent.

JOUR 5163: Advanced Photography

Prerequisite: JOUR (ART) 1163 or consent of instructor.

An introduction to advanced photographic techniques including digital photography. Various historic and current theories of visual communication provide a substantive base for the application of techniques.

JOUR 5193: Communication Research Methods

Introduction to the methodologies of behavioral science applied to communication research including design measurement, data collection, and analysis. Explores the use of surveys, content analysis, focus groups, and experiments in studies of communication processes and effects. Students will complete a research project.

JOUR 5243: Journalism Writing Seminar

This course is designed to teach the fundamentals of news writing and fact-gathering for the mass media in a concentrated format. Emphasis will be on newspaper writing style, but the fundamentals will apply to broadcasting, news media, public relations, advertising, and other fields.

JOUR 6013: Visual Storytelling

Visual Storytelling covers the fundamentals of enhanced story development using mobile media platforms for journalistic publication.

JOUR 6023: Video Production for New Media

Prerequisites: JOUR 6013.

This course focuses on the art and science of documentary film making, specifically geared toward publication to new media audiences.

JOUR 6053: Media and Society

Incorporates mass communication theory as well as the global nature of media operations while focusing on the relationship between mass media and society. Students will examine contemporary issues that confront media professionals together with the social responsibilities and ethical questions that attend such issues. The political, social, and governmental influences on media policies and practices will also be emphasized in addition to the effects of media on society and culture.

JOUR 6133: Multi-Media Publishing

Advanced Photography and Video. Focuses on designing communication messages on the computer that combine several media and are interactive. Using the same software tools that are used in the multi-media industry, students learn to conceptualize, design, prepare, and program works for publication on CD-ROM and/or the WEB. Projects incorporate photographs, music, sound, video, and extensive user interactivity. Work in the course attempts to parallel product development in the real world multi-media industry.

JOUR 6193: Journalistic Writing for Multi-Media

Introduction to writing for multi-media. Course explores the advantages, audiences, and various technologies before studying the formats and language appropriate for each medium. Students develop their writing skills through analysis and practice.

JOUR 6331: Professional Portfolio

Students will create a portfolio of acquired work as well as develop a journalistic story told through multiple media platforms. The portfolio must meet industry standards and demonstrate a mastery of technical skill based in theoretical conventions of new media.

Note: May be repeated for credit.

JOUR 6332: Professional Portfolio

Students will create a portfolio of acquired work as well as develop a journalistic story told through multiple media platforms. The portfolio must meet industry standards and demonstrate a mastery of technical skill based in theoretical conventions of new media.

Note: May be repeated for credit.

JOUR 6333: Professional Portfolio

Students will create a portfolio of acquired work as well as develop a journalistic story told through multiple media platforms. The portfolio must meet industry standards and demonstrate a mastery of technical skill based in theoretical conventions of new media.

Note: May be repeated for credit.

JOUR 6891: Independent Study

Open to graduate students who wish to pursue individual study or investigation of some facet of knowledge which complements the purpose of the University's graduate program. Students will be required to plan their studies and prepare formal written reports of their findings.

Note: The selected topic may not constitute any duplication of study leading to the accomplishment of a thesis.

Note: May be repeated for credit.

JOUR 6892: Independent Study

Open to graduate students who wish to pursue individual study or investigation of some facet of knowledge which complements the purpose of the University's graduate program. Students will be required to plan their studies and prepare formal written reports of their findings.

Note: The selected topic may not constitute any duplication of study leading to the accomplishment of a thesis.

Note: May be repeated for credit.

JOUR 6893: Independent Study

Open to graduate students who wish to pursue individual study or investigation of some facet of knowledge which complements the purpose of the University's graduate program. Students will be required to plan their studies and prepare formal written reports of their findings.

Note: The selected topic may not constitute any duplication of study leading to the accomplishment of a thesis.

Note: May be repeated for credit.

JOUR 6894: Independent Study

Open to graduate students who wish to pursue individual study or investigation of some facet of knowledge which complements the purpose of the University's graduate program. Students will be required to plan their studies and prepare formal written reports of their findings.

Note: The selected topic may not constitute any duplication of study leading to the accomplishment of a thesis.

Note: May be repeated for credit.

JOUR 6991: Project or Thesis Research Continuation

This course allows students additional time to research and compose their capstone project/portfolio.

Note: May be repeated for credit.

JOUR 6996: Professional Project

Projects should be original work that is a manifestation of the student's multi-media expertise and reflect both a mastery of content with respect to a given topic as well as the technological skill to present the same in a multi-media format. All completed projects must include a written review of the literature and other materials relevant to the project. It is anticipated the review will be substantive and comprehensive, and clearly indicate how the project builds on intellectual and journalistic traditions.

Note: May be repeated for credit.

LA 6013: Introduction to the Liberal Arts

A study of the ideas, methods, and resources appropriate to the disciplines in the liberal arts.

LA 6711: Liberal Arts Project

Completion of creative or research project. Grade received for successful completion of project is credit (CR).

LA 6712: Liberal Arts Project

Completion of creative or research project. Grade received for successful completion of project is credit (CR).

LA 6713: Liberal Arts Project

Completion of creative or research project. Grade received for successful completion of project is credit (CR).

LBMD 6003: Collection Development and Management

A study of the selection, evaluation, organization, and purchasing of instructional materials for the school library media center. The course includes a review of selection tools for identifying materials, determining suitability for specific grade levels, and establishing purchasing and teacher review procedures.

LBMD 6013: Reference Materials in the School Library Media Center

Study of the techniques of reference work, reference interviews, types of reference questions, selection of reference materials (print and non-print), and practice in their use with special emphasis on school library media centers. Networking for the purpose of sharing resources will receive emphasis in the course. Students will be required to do hands-on machine reference searches in addition to a research project.

LBMD 6023: Classification and Cataloging

Prerequisite: Nine (9) hours of graduate study or permission of instructor.

A study of the principles and competencies of cataloging and classification. Attention centered on the actual classification and cataloging of school library media center materials. Students will be required to do hands-on machine cataloging.

LBMD 6033: The Instructional Role of the Library Media Specialist

A course for the prospective school library media specialist focusing on the instructional role of the school library media specialist. Students will develop curriculum based upon the national and state standards for library media specialist.

LBMD 6043: Preservation of Instructional Materials

The tools and skills for preservation of materials used in education today will be emphasized. Preservation of printed, audio, video, and digital materials are just some of the techniques of study.

LBMD 6403: Literature for Children and Young Adults

An in-depth study of printed and other types of materials available for use in the elementary grades and middle school. Emphasizes the selection and use of materials to stimulate and improve learning.

LBMD 6503: School Librarian: Leadership and Collaboration

This course focuses on the role of the school librarian as an educational leader and instructional partner. Students will explore professional dispositions, promotional efforts, collaborative partnerships, and advocacy aspects of the school librarian's critical leadership role in the learning community.

MGMT 5203: Project Management

Prerequisites: Graduate standing, BUAD 2053 or higher-level math course, BUAD 2003 or COMS 2003 or higher level microcomputer applications course, or permission of the instructor.

This course explores the techniques of organizing the main elements of project management: people, cost, schedule, and scope. The course emphasis is aimed toward a practical understanding of Project Management for future business leaders and engineers. Students will learn to utilize information technology that aids in the visualization and documentation of the project planning and management process.

Note: May not be taken for credit after MGMT 4203.

MGMT 6093: Special Topics in Management

Course offers an in-depth exploration of selected management issues affecting business. The primary focus of the course will vary from offering to offering; thus the course may be taken more than once. There is a required research project.

Note: Students are limited to a maximum of six (6) hours of special topics credit.

MGMT 6103: Organizational Management and Leadership

This course is a study of the human behaviors and leadership issues which affect the day-to-day operations of the modern organization, organizational decision making and teamwork.

$35 per SSCH course fee.

MGMT 6203: Decision Modeling in Supply Chain Management

All firms have to deal with supply chain challenges such as configuration and operations of supply chain, inventory positions across the supply chain, allocation of resources to minimize cost and maximize revenue. These challenges represent the complexity of processes within a supply chain, which complicates the decision making for the decision makers. This course focuses on utilizing data driven decision making in complex supply chain processes. Students will use various analytical tools such as linear programming models, shortest-path models, nonlinear programming models, decision trees, forecasting models, and Monte Carlo simulation to solve supply chain challenges faced by firms in various industries.

$35 per SSCH course fee.

MGMT 6903: Corporate Strategic Management

Prerequisite: Completion of 18 hours toward program requirements.

As the capstone course in the MBA, this course examines the application of strategic management processes, including top management's role in situational analysis, strategy selection, strategy implementation, and strategic control, under conditions of uncertainty. There are required cases as well as a dynamic simulation and a final recorded professional presentation.

$35 per SSCH course fee.

MKT 6093: Special Topics in Marketing

Course offers an in-depth exploration of selected marketing issues affecting business. The primary focus of the course will vary from offering to offering; thus the course may be taken more than once. There is a required research project.

Note: Students are limited to a maximum of six (6) hours of special topics credit.

MKT 6103: Digital Marketing Strategy

This course will cover the history and best practices associated with digital marketing. Additionally, it will address the types of organizations and setting that (can) benefit from digital commerce technologies and strategies in a cost-effective way. Finally, the course addresses how digital marketing and other advertising strategies must be part of a comprehensive marketing campaign.

$35 per SSCH course fee.

MKT 6113: Strategic Social Media Marketing

This course examines the force of social media marketing and its place in the marketing process. The advantages and use of particular platforms will be explored, and the use of social media analytics to craft strategy will be examined.

$35 per SSCH course fee.

MKT 6153: Consumer Insights

Business opportunities and decisions depend on an understanding of customers' values, needs, aspirations and behaviors. Even more important for a specific company is gaining unique insights into their customers so that they can develop products, services and brands that are differentiated from competition.

$35 per SSCH course fee.

MKT 6323: Applied Predictive Analytics

Cross-listed: BDA 6323

Prerequisite: BUAD 2053, PSY 2053, STAT 2163, or STAT 2303 with a "C" or better.

This course will explore multivariate techniques to analyzing data (e.g. multivariate regression, discriminant analysis, logistic regression, market-basket analysis, forecasting and other analytic techniques). The focus of the course will be providing input for organizational strategic decision-making. As an applied analytics course, emphasis will be on application of predictive analytic techniques explored through conceptual, computational, procedural and computer applications.

$35 per SSCH course fee.

MAEC 6033: Principles of Child Development and Classroom Management

This course is a study of the developmental stages, cognitive perceptions, and information processing of young children and classroom management techniques based on these characteristics for use in early childhood environments.

MAEC 6163: Instruction and Assessment for Diverse Learners

This course examines the aligning of instruction and assessment in academic subjects by planning, implementing, and using evaluation strategies designed to facilitate cognitive content for diverse learners. It also addresses professional and ethical issues regarding instruction, assessment, and evaluation of learners with emphasis upon the early childhood learner.

MAEC 6213: Early Childhood Curriculum for Young Children

This course examines curriculum development and analysis of early childhood educational settings. The course also requires that students apply the theories and principles to instructional planning, teaching, managing, and assessing students in the public school classroom.

MAEC 6323: Diagnostic Literacy Instruction and Interventions

A course designed to study current practices in assessing young children's reading and writing development for the purpose of diagnosing and planning instruction and interventions.

MAEC 6806: Internship

The internship will provide a direct, substantial, and full-day, experience for a minimum of 12 weeks with an early childhood emphasis. Types of embedded professional development include action research, peer coaching, networking, portfolio development, teaming, live case studies, curriculum design, needs assessment, data collection, and data analysis. The placement of candidates in the field is a thoughtful process, considerate of a complexity of standards, policies, procedures, agreements, and partnerships with the public schools, rules, regulations, and budgetary constraints as well as the special needs, hardships in housing and transportation, and employment futures of teacher candidates.

MAMS 5303: Middle School Philosophy and Organization

This course is a study of developmentally appropriate curriculum, instruction and pedagogy for teaching the middle level student that includes an understanding of the historical perspective of middle schools and their program. The course also addresses the unique developmental needs of the young adolescent.

MAMS 5333: Teaching Literacy in the Content Areas

This course is designed to examine the connections between literacy and learning across the curriculum, issues related to content literacy within the context of standards-based instruction, needs of struggling readers and writers, and development of culturally responsive instruction and assessments. Course includes creating literate environments, using research-based instructional practices, strategies, and technology to extend and enrich content knowledge.

MAMS 6063: Educational Assessment

This course is designed to provide the knowledge base for construction, selection, administration, and interpretation of formal, informal, and alternative forms of student assessment.

MAMS 6303: Models of Teaching

This course overviews a variety of research-based models of teaching and provides teachers with the knowledge and skills to apply these models in their classrooms. The course also requires that students apply the theories and principles to instructional planning, teaching, managing, and assessing students in the public school classroom. The course consists of classroom instruction.

MAMS 6806: Internship

The internship will provide a direct, substantial, and full-day, experience for a minimum of 12 weeks with a respective middle level or secondary emphasis (dependent upon program preparation). Types of embedded professional development include action research, peer coaching, networking, portfolio development, teaming, live case studies, curriculum design, needs assessment, data collection, and data analysis. The placement of candidates in the field is a thoughtful process, considerate of a complexity of standards, policies, procedures, agreements, and partnerships with the public schools, rules, regulations, and budgetary constraints as well as the special needs, hardships in housing and transportation, and employment futures of teacher candidates.

MAT 5703: Technology for Teaching and Learning

This is a research-based course involving applications of media techniques to facilitate learning. Media presentations are planned and implemented using practical and theoretical considerations about learning characteristics, exceptionalities, and cultural differences. Various projection techniques as well as microcomputer application are utilized.

MAT 6003: Educational Research

Cross-listed: EDFD 6003

An introduction to educational research procedures, including formulation of research problems, research designs, data collections, and analysis of data.

MAT 6043: Principles and Theories of Learning

Cross-listed: EDFD 6043

This course introduces teacher candidates to educational psychology as a research oriented discipline and a science of practical application.

MAT 6053: The At-Risk Child in the School Environment

Cross-listed: EDFD 6053

A seminar designed to investigate the characteristics of the at-risk student, the teaching strategies utilized to meet the needs of the at-risk student in the classroom, and the national and state laws concerning students with exceptionalities.

MAT 6403: Social, Historical, and Legal Factors in Education

Cross-listed: EDFD 6403

This course examines the study of education and various social groups, including the effects of various societies and educational systems. It also examines the legal factors that must be considered in the educational process.

MAT 6503: Classroom Behavioral Management

Cross-listed: EDFD 6503

A seminar to examine research for sources and types of models available for managing the classroom. Development of classroom management skills and systems by applying human development, learning, teaching, and communication principles. This class will review the research and professional literature on classroom management. It includes a practicum involving field experiences in the public school.

MATH 5103: Linear Algebra II

Prerequisite: MATH 4003 or consent of the department of mathematics.

A continuation of MATH 4003 with emphasis on abstract vector spaces, inner product spaces, linear transformations, kernel and range, and applications of linear algebra.

Note: MATH 5103 may not be taken for credit after completion of MATH 4103 or equivalent.

MATH 5153: Applied Statistics II

Prerequisite: MATH 3153.

This course is a continuation of Math 3153 with emphasis on experimental design, analysis of variance, and multiple regression analysis. Students will be required to design and carry out an experiment, use a current statistical software package to analyze the data, and make inferences based upon the analysis.

Note: Math 5153 may not be taken for credit after completion of Math 4153 or equivalent.

MATH 5173: Advanced Biostatistics

Prerequisite: An introductory statistics course or permission of instructor.

This course will include analysis of variance, one factor experiments, experimental design with two or more factors, linear and multiple regression analysis, and categorical data analysis.

MATH 5243: Differential Equations II

Prerequisites: MATH 3243 and MATH 4003 or consent of the instructor.

A continuation of MATH 3243 with emphasis on higher order and systems of differential equations.

MATH 5273: Complex Variables

Prerequisite: MATH 2943.

An introduction to complex variables. This course will emphasize the subject matter and skills needed for applications of complex variables in science, engineering, and mathematics. Topics will include complex numbers, analytic functions, elementary functions of a complex variable, mapping by elementary functions, integrals, series, residues and poles, and conformal mapping.

Note: May not be taken for credit after the completion of MATH 4273 or equivalent.

MATH 5343: Introduction to Partial Differential Equations

Prerequisites: MATH 2934 and MATH 3243.

This course is an introduction to partial differential equations with emphasis on applications to physical science and engineering. Analysis covers the equations of heat, wave, diffusion, Laplace, Dirichlet and Neumann equations. Course is suitable for senior level or first year graduate students in Mathematics, Physics, and Engineering.

MATH 6213: Methods in Teaching Middle School Mathematics

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

The course is an exploration of inductive teaching models, techniques, strategies, and research for teaching mathematics in the middle school. Emphasis will be placed on constructivist learning.

MATH 6323: Methods in Teaching Secondary Mathematics

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

The course is a study of materials, methods, and strategies for teaching mathematics in the secondary school. Emphasis will be placed on activity-based learning.

MATH 6881: Workshop

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

The workshop will require the equivalency of fifteen clock hours of instruction per credit hour.

MATH 6882: Workshop

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

The workshop will require the equivalency of fifteen clock hours of instruction per credit hour.

MATH 6883: Workshop

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

The workshop will require the equivalency of fifteen clock hours of instruction per credit hour.

MATH 6891: Independent Study

Open to graduate students who wish to pursue individual study or investigation of some facet of knowledge which complements the purpose of the University's graduate program. Students will be required to plan their studies and prepare formal written reports of their findings.

Note: The selected topic may not constitute any duplication of study leading to the accomplishment of a thesis.

MATH 6892: Independent Study

Open to graduate students who wish to pursue individual study or investigation of some facet of knowledge which complements the purpose of the University's graduate program. Students will be required to plan their studies and prepare formal written reports of their findings.

Note: The selected topic may not constitute any duplication of study leading to the accomplishment of a thesis.

MATH 6893: Independent Study

Open to graduate students who wish to pursue individual study or investigation of some facet of knowledge which complements the purpose of the University's graduate program. Students will be required to plan their studies and prepare formal written reports of their findings.

Note: The selected topic may not constitute any duplication of study leading to the accomplishment of a thesis.

MATH 6894: Independent Study

Open to graduate students who wish to pursue individual study or investigation of some facet of knowledge which complements the purpose of the University's graduate program. Students will be required to plan their studies and prepare formal written reports of their findings.

Note: The selected topic may not constitute any duplication of study leading to the accomplishment of a thesis.

MATH 6991: Project or Thesis Research Continuation

This course allows students additional time to research and compose their capstone project/portfolio.

MCEG 5043: Physical Metallurgy

Prerequisites: MCEG 2023, MCEG 3013, and MCEG 3313.

This course provides the student with an in-depth background to the mechanisms and applications of dislocation motion, crystal plasticity, phase transformations and solidification processes. Common industrial and experimental processes are studied for both ferrous and non-ferrous materials.

Note: May not be taken for credit after completion of MCEG 4043.

MCEG 5053: Corrosion Principles

Prerequisites: MCEG 2023, MCEG 3313, CHEM 2124.

This course provides the student with an introductory study on the principles, mechanisms and chemistry of material corrosion. The study will extend to material failures linked to corrosion processes and effects of environment on corrosion potential and kinetics.

Note: May not be taken for credit after completion of MCEG 4053.

MCEG 5323: Power Plant Systems

Prerequisites: MCEG 3313, MCEG 4403.

A study of the design and operation of steam-electric power plant components and systems. Fossil and renewable energy plants are emphasized.

Note: May not be taken for credit after completion of MCEG 4323.

MCEG 5343: Internal Combustion Engines

Prerequisites: MCEG 3313, MCEG 4403.

A study of the operating and design principles of internal combustion engines. The course will cover combustion cycles, emissions and performance analysis and testing.

Note: May not be taken for credit after completion of MCEG 4343.

Lecture three (3) hours with lab exercises.

MCEG 5413: Finite Element Analysis

Prerequisites: ELEG 2103, MCEG (ELEG) 3003, and MCEG 3013.

Introduction to approximate methods using finite elements. Development of the finite element method using variational formulations. Applications include machine design, mechanical vibrations, heat transfer, fluid flow, and electromagnetics.

MCEG 5453: Energy Management

Prerequisites: MCEG 3313, MCEG 4403, MCEG 4443, or consent of instructor.

Energy management in commercial building and industrial plants. Utility rate structures. Sources of primary energy. Energy conversion devices. Prime movers of energy. Heat. Electricity. Lighting. HVAC Equipment. Building envelope. Electric motors. Estimating energy savings. Economic justification. Energy auditing.

MCEG 5463: Heating, Ventilating, and Air-Conditioning Design

Prerequisite: MCEG 3313.

A study of the principles of human thermal comfort including applied psychrometrics and air-conditioning processes. Fundamentals of analysis of heating and cooling loads and design of HVAC systems.

Note: May not be taken for graduate credit after completion of MCEG 4463.

MCEG 5473: Mechanical Vibrations

Offered: approximately, every other year

Prerequisites: MCEG 2033, MATH 3243.

The study of free and forced vibration of single degree-of-freedom systems, response to harmonic, periodic and non-periodic excitations. Multi degree-of-freedom systems and matrix methods are explored. Computational techniques for predicting system response of continuous systems are introduced.

Note: May not be taken for credit after completion of MCEG 4473.

MCEG 5503: Nuclear Power Plants I

Prerequisites: MCEG 3503, MCEG 4403.

A study of the various types of nuclear reactor plants including the methods used for energy conversion. Relative advantages/disadvantages of various plant types investigated.

Note: May not be taken for credit after completion of MCEG 4503.

MCEG 5993: Special Problems in Engineering I

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

A individual or group study in an advanced area of engineering under the direction of a faculty advisor. May be taught in conjunction with an associated MCEG 4993 section.

Note: May not be taken for credit after gaining credit for a 4993 section with the same topic.

MCEG 6013: Continuum Mechanics

Offered: Once every two years

Prerequisites: Graduate admission and MCEG 3013 or equivalent

Development of field equations and generalized constitutive expressions for fluid and solid continua. Topics include: tensor analysis, kinematics, conservation of mass and momentum, and invariance and symmetry principles.

MCEG 6023: Elasticity

Offered: Once every two years

Prerequisites: MCEG 6013.

Analysis of stress and strain in two and three dimensions, equilibrium and compatibility equations, torsion of non-circular members, and variational methods.

MCEG 6323: Energy Systems

Prerequisites: MCEG 4433, MCEG 4403 or permission of instructor.

A study of various energy sources and the production of usable energy from them. Conventional and alternative energy sources are covered as well as economic environmental concerns.

MCEG 6443: Advanced Heat Transfer

Prerequisites or Co-requisites: MCEG 3313, 4403, 4443, or permission of instructor.

A study of the advanced principles of heat transfer: numerical methods in heat transfer, advanced boundary layer theory, advanced thermal radiation topics, and heat exchangers.

MCEG 6503: Reactor Physics

Prerequisites: PHYS 3213, MCEG 3503, MATH 5243.

A study of the fundamental physical principles in the operation and design of nuclear reactors. Includes neutron-nucleus interactions, neutron energy spectra and energy dependent cross sections, neutron transport and diffusion theory, multi-group approximations, criticality calculations, and reactor analysis and design methods.

MCEG 6513: Radiation Measurement

Prerequisites: MCEG 3503, MCEG 3512.

The study of radiation techniques and equipment used by scientists and engineers. Topics of interest will include techniques and equipment for detecting ionizing radiation below about 20 MeV, coincidence counting methods, and reactor laboratory experiments (as available).

Lecture two (2) hours, lab three (3) hours.

MCEG 6523: Nuclear Materials

Prerequisites: MCEG 2023 and MCEG 3503.

A study of the properties of materials utilized in nuclear reactors, shielding systems, and other systems exposed to radiation. Emphasis will be placed on understanding and mitigation the damage of such materials by neutron and gamma radiation.

MCEG 6533: Radiation Interactions and Shielding

Prerequisites: MCEG 3503, MCEG 3523.

Radiation Interactions and Shielding. Basic principles of radiation interactions, transport and shielding. Radiation sources, nuclear reactions, radiation transport, photon interactions, dosimetry, and shielding design will be covered.

MCEG 6881: Special Topics in Engineering

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

Special topics in engineering relating to current engineering topics not covered in other courses.

Note: May be repeated for credit if course content varies.

MCEG 6882: Special Topics in Engineering

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

Special topics in engineering relating to current engineering topics not covered in other courses.

Note: May be repeated for credit if course content varies.

MCEG 6883: Special Topics in Engineering

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

Special topics in engineering relating to current engineering topics not covered in other courses.

Note: May be repeated for credit if course content varies.

MCEG 6891: Independent Study

Prerequisites: Completion of 18 hours toward program requirements, approval of advisor.

Students will complete an engineering project approved by their Advisory Committee. The project must include elements of engineering design and project management with a subject relevant to the student's program of study. Successful completion of the project will include a professional report and full presentation of the project findings/results.

Note: May be repeated for credit if course content varies.

MCEG 6892: Independent Study

Prerequisites: Completion of 18 hours toward program requirements, approval of advisor.

Students will complete an engineering project approved by their Advisory Committee. The project must include elements of engineering design and project management with a subject relevant to the student's program of study. Successful completion of the project will include a professional report and full presentation of the project findings/results.

Note: May be repeated for credit if course content varies.

MCEG 6893: Independent Study

Prerequisites: Completion of 18 hours toward program requirements, approval of advisor.

Students will complete an engineering project approved by their Advisory Committee. The project must include elements of engineering design and project management with a subject relevant to the student's program of study. Successful completion of the project will include a professional report and full presentation of the project findings/results.

Note: May be repeated for credit if course content varies.

MCEG 6894: Independent Study

Prerequisites: Completion of 18 hours toward program requirements, approval of advisor.

Students will complete an engineering project approved by their Advisory Committee. The project must include elements of engineering design and project management with a subject relevant to the student's program of study. Successful completion of the project will include a professional report and full presentation of the project findings/results.

Note: May be repeated for credit if course content varies.

MCEG 6895: Independent Study

Prerequisites: Completion of 18 hours toward program requirements, approval of advisor.

Students will complete an engineering project approved by their Advisory Committee. The project must include elements of engineering design and project management with a subject relevant to the student's program of study. Successful completion of the project will include a professional report and full presentation of the project findings/results.

Note: May be repeated for credit if course content varies.

MCEG 6896: Independent Study

Prerequisites: Completion of 18 hours toward program requirements, approval of advisor.

Students will complete an engineering project approved by their Advisory Committee. The project must include elements of engineering design and project management with a subject relevant to the student's program of study. Successful completion of the project will include a professional report and full presentation of the project findings/results.

Note: May be repeated for credit if course content varies.

MLED 5013: Teaching the Young Adolescent

A study of developmentally appropriate curriculum, instruction, and pedagogy for teaching the young adolescent with an understanding of the historical perspective of middle schools and programs.

MLED 5033: Young Adolescent Growth and Development

Prospective middle level teachers will study the educational implications of the developmental period of young adolescence. An emphasis is placed on developmental characteristics of the young adolescent highlighting the role of the middle level teacher in promoting the healthy development of the young adolescent.

MLED 5043: Diversity in the Middle Level Classroom

Prospective middle level teachers will study the educational implications of the economic, cultural, racial, and intellectually diverse middle level classroom.

MUSM 5403: Interpretation/Education through Museum Methods

Cross-listed: ANTH 5403, HIST 5403

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor or Department Head.

Museum perspectives and approaches to care and interpretation of cultural resources, including, interpretive techniques of exhibit and education outreach materials, and integrating museum interpretation/ education into public school and general public programming. Class projects focus on special problems for managing interpretive materials in a museum setting. Graduate level projects or papers involve carrying out research relevant to the Museum's mission and relating to current Museum goals.

Note: May not be taken for credit after completion of MUSM 4403, ANTH 4403, or HIST 4403.

MUS 5803: History of American Music

No previous music study required. An in-depth study of American music and its relationship to American history and culture from the 19th century to the present. Research, aural activity, and analysis are used to explore a variety of musical forms, composers, and performers.

MUS 5853: Music of the World's Peoples

Cross-listed: ANTH 5853

A survey of predominantly non-Western world music cultures with attention to sonic structures, musicians, musical instruments, and socio-cultural contexts of music making. Listening emphasized.

Note: Open to students in all majors.

MUS 6893: Independent Study

Open to graduate students who wish to pursue individual study or investigation of some facet of knowledge which complements the purpose of the University's graduate program. Students will be required to plan their studies and prepare formal written reports of their findings.

Note: The selected topic may not constitute any duplication of study leading to the accomplishment of a thesis.

NUR 6103: Theoretical Perspectives

This course is designed to provide the student with the skills necessary to critique, evaluate, and apply theories from nursing and related healthcare disciplines. Philosophical and theoretical underpinnings of the nursing discipline will be explored with in depth discussion of knowledge development and theory analysis. Students will study a selected phenomenon in depth and learn the strategies for concept analysis and development.

$15 course fee.

NUR 6113: Foundations of Nursing Education

This graduate level course introduces the students to fundamental principles of teaching and learning among a diverse population in academia and clinical environments. Students will develop innovative teaching strategies along with traditional and online methods.

NUR 6203: Research Design and Methods

This course focuses on quantitative and qualitative research design with an emphasis on strategies for incorporating current research findings into the provision of healthcare to improve quality of care and care delivery. Students will identify common problems in nursing and healthcare systems, and determine the most appropriate research methodology for finding or creating solutions. Students are expected to critically appraise published research and develop appropriate and creative methods for utilizing current research findings in a variety of healthcare settings.

$15 course fee.

NUR 6213: Epidemiology

This course will prepare the nurse administrator to study the health-related states of client populations and apply epidemiological, social, and environmental data to the health status of individuals, families, groups, and communities. Students will examine environmental and occupational hazards leading to disease and evaluate preventative and therapeutic measures that are available within healthcare delivery systems. Current epidemic and pandemic issues will be discussed in addition to biological, chemical, and radiological threats.

$15 course fee.

NUR 6303: Law, Ethics, and Policy in Healthcare

This course is an overview of current trends in healthcare today and the legal/ethical issues with which the nurse manager in healthcare systems may confront. Students will examine contemporary social, economic, ethical, and legislative issues influencing healthcare policy. Such issues as legal liability of professionals, legal compliance, ethical standards and personnel law will also be examined.

$15 course fee.

NUR 6313: The Role of the Nurse Administrator

This course will prepare the graduate to analyze theories and research relevant to the role of nurse administrator as leader and manager. Emphasis will be placed on the internal and external forces influencing the nurse administrator role. Seminars will focus on healthcare policy, organization, healthcare delivery systems, and fiscal management. The graduate will be able to assume a leadership role in the managing of human, fiscal, and physical healthcare resources in a variety of healthcare settings.

$15 course fee.

NUR 6333: Epidemics and Pandemics

This course introduces students to the history of infectious diseases and their causative agents, emerging and reemerging diseases that lead to epidemics and pandemics, fundamental epidemiological principles, and surveillance and mitigation strategies. Factors such as urbanization, modern transportation systems, environment, and disrupted ecosystems contributing to the emergence of new infectious diseases and the spread of older diseases will be explored. This course will also examine societal responses to disease, public policy considerations, and the emerging threat of bioweapons.

NUR 6403: Non-Thesis Project

Directed research study of a topic selected by the student, incorporating literature review of current research findings and a written project proposal. This course is designed to provide an opportunity for the student to identify a topic of interest and propose a strategy for implementation of a new program of system change.

$15 course fee.

NUR 6503: Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management

Prerequisite: NUR 6313

This course deals both with human resource issues in the healthcare organizations and with the theoretical foundations of organizational development as an applied behavioral science. Attention will be directed to the dynamics of contemporary human relations in healthcare organizations.

$15 course fee.

NUR 6513: Fiscal Management in Health Care System

Prerequisite: NUR 6313

Financial management and systems development in a changing health care environment are the focus of this course. This course begins with a basic review of accounting systems in health care facilities. Key concepts such as cost behavior and analysis, budgeting, and internal controls are all explored. Strategic planning and implementation will also be examined.

$15 course fee.

NUR 6526: Nursing Administration Practicum

Prerequisites: 24 hours of core courses and NUR 6503 and NUR 6513.

This course is designed to promote student application of theory to practice. Students, with faculty approval, will select the healthcare setting and nurse administrator for the practicum. Students will be required to plan their studies, set specific learning objectives, and provide formal written reports on their findings. The nurse administrator should work closely with his/her preceptor to assess job requirements, analyze budgets and budgetary needs, and develop a plan to provide quality, cost-effective nursing care to patients.

$30 course fee.

NUR 6603: Crisis Intervention in Disasters

This course is designed to prepare the nurse administrator to develop a crisis intervention program and to understand a wide range of crisis intervention strategies including pre and post incident crisis education, crisis intervention for individuals, significant other support services, demobilizations after large scale traumas/disaster, small group defusing, and group intervention. The nurse administrator should have the knowledge necessary to assess, plan, organize, implement, and evaluate a crisis intervention program.

$15 course fee.

NUR 6991: Research Thesis

This course is directed research on a thesis topic selected by the student in consultation with a supervising professor. The student will be required to present the thesis in a seminar to faculty and other graduate students.

Note: May be repeated for credit.

$5 course fee per credit hour.

NUR 6992: Research Thesis

This course is directed research on a thesis topic selected by the student in consultation with a supervising professor. The student will be required to present the thesis in a seminar to faculty and other graduate students.

Note: May be repeated for credit.

$5 course fee per credit hour.

NUR 6993: Research Thesis

This course is directed research on a thesis topic selected by the student in consultation with a supervising professor. The student will be required to present the thesis in a seminar to faculty and other graduate students.

Note: May be repeated for credit.

$5 course fee per credit hour.

NUR 6994: Research Thesis

This course is directed research on a thesis topic selected by the student in consultation with a supervising professor. The student will be required to present the thesis in a seminar to faculty and other graduate students.

Note: May be repeated for credit.

$5 course fee per credit hour.

NUR 6995: Research Thesis

This course is directed research on a thesis topic selected by the student in consultation with a supervising professor. The student will be required to present the thesis in a seminar to faculty and other graduate students.

Note: May be repeated for credit.

$5 course fee per credit hour.

NUR 6996: Research Thesis

This course is directed research on a thesis topic selected by the student in consultation with a supervising professor. The student will be required to present the thesis in a seminar to faculty and other graduate students.

Note: May be repeated for credit.

$30 course fee.

PHIL 5093: American Philosophy

Cross-listed: HIST 5223

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor or Department Head.

An examination of the main currents of American philosophical and religious thought from the earliest times to the present.

PE 5013: Structural and Mechanical Kinesiology Concepts

Prerequisite: Undergraduate degree from an accredited university

An investigation of the structural and mechanical bases of human movement, sport, and exercise programming. Completion of this "leveling" course with a grade of "B" or higher is a prerequisite for admission Into the SCS degree program for those students who have not already completed an undergraduate course in Kinesiology/Biomechanics with a grade of ''B" or higher.

Note: This course does not count towards the Strength and Conditioning Studies degree requirements.

PE 5023: Applied Physiology Concepts

Prerequisite: Undergraduate degree from an accredited university

An investigation into the acute responses and chronic adaptations made by the human body in adjusting to various types of physical activity. Completion of this "leveling" course with a grade of "B" or higher is a prerequisite for admission into the SCS degree program for those students who have not already completed an undergraduate course in Exercise Physiology with a grade of' "B" or higher.

Note: This course does not count towards the Strength and Conditioning Studies degree requirements.

PE 6033: Exercise Physiology

Prerequisites: PE 4033 or equivalent with the grade of B or better, PE 2653, and PE 3663 or approval of department head.

A study of the physiological changes in the human organism which accompany physical exercise and the implication of the changes for physical education.

PE 6043: Motor Learning and Control

Prerequisites: PE 3663 or equivalent with grade of B or better and PE 2653, or approval by department head.

Provides an understanding of psychological principles involved in motor performance.

PE 6053: Biomechanics

Prerequisites: PE 2653, PE 3663 or equivalent with a B or better, algebra or general mathematics, and physical science or physics, or approval by department head.

The application of physics as it relates to human movement. Specific emphasis will be made on the mechanics and common injuries involved with selected sport or work related movements.

PE 6063: Current Issues in Coaching and Athletics

This course will afford the student the opportunity to analyze historical and contemporary coaching and athletics Issues and to develop cogent written and oral arguments regarding them.

PE 6073: Exercise and Sport Behavior

Prerequisite: PE 4513 or approval by department head.

The course provides an in-depth view of the psychological aspects of human behavior in sport and exercise settings.

PE 6083: Research Methods and Statistics

Prerequisite: PE 4523 or approval by department head.

Designed to familiarize the student with research literature, techniques, and statistical procedures used in physical education today.

PE 6881: Workshop

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

The workshop will require the equivalency of fifteen clock hours of instruction per credit hour.

Note: May be repeated for credit.

PE 6882: Workshop

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

The workshop will require the equivalency of fifteen clock hours of instruction per credit hour.

Note: May be repeated for credit.

PE 6883: Workshop

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

The workshop will require the equivalency of fifteen clock hours of instruction per credit hour.

Note: May be repeated for credit.

PE 6891: Independent Study

Open to graduate students who wish to pursue individual study or investigation of some facet of knowledge which complements the purpose of the University's graduate program. Students will be required to plan their studies and prepare formal written reports of their findings.

Note: The selected topic may not constitute any duplication of study leading to the accomplishment of a thesis.

Note: May be repeated for credit.

PE 6892: Independent Study

Open to graduate students who wish to pursue individual study or investigation of some facet of knowledge which complements the purpose of the University's graduate program. Students will be required to plan their studies and prepare formal written reports of their findings.

Note: The selected topic may not constitute any duplication of study leading to the accomplishment of a thesis.

Note: May be repeated for credit.

PE 6893: Independent Study

Open to graduate students who wish to pursue individual study or investigation of some facet of knowledge which complements the purpose of the University's graduate program. Students will be required to plan their studies and prepare formal written reports of their findings.

Note: The selected topic may not constitute any duplication of study leading to the accomplishment of a thesis.

Note: May be repeated for credit.

PE 6894: Independent Study

Open to graduate students who wish to pursue individual study or investigation of some facet of knowledge which complements the purpose of the University's graduate program. Students will be required to plan their studies and prepare formal written reports of their findings.

Note: The selected topic may not constitute any duplication of study leading to the accomplishment of a thesis.

Note: May be repeated for credit.

PE 6993: Thesis Research

Directed research on a thesis topic selected by the student in consultation with a supervising professor.

Note: May be repeated for credit.

PHSC 6883: Workshop

Prerequisite: EDFD 6003 or permission of instructor.

The workshop will require the equivalency of fifteen clock hours of instruction per credit hour.

PHYS 6881: Workshop

The workshop will require the equivalency of fifteen clock hours of instruction per credit hour.

PHYS 6882: Workshop

The workshop will require the equivalency of fifteen clock hours of instruction per credit hour.

PHYS 6883: Workshop

The workshop will require the equivalency of fifteen clock hours of instruction per credit hour.

PHYS 6884: Workshop

The workshop will require the equivalency of fifteen clock hours of instruction per credit hour.

POLS 6893: Independent Study

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor or department head.

Open to graduate students who wish to pursue individual study or investigation of some facet of knowledge which complements the purpose of the University's graduate program. Students will be required to plan their studies and prepare formal written reports of their findings.

Note: The selected topic may not constitute any duplication of study leading to the accomplishment of a thesis.

PSY 5013: History of Psychology

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in psychology or instructor and program director permission.

A survey of the developments in psychology from the ancient Greeks to the emergence of psychology as a modern experimental science.

PSY 5033: Psychological Tests and Measurements

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in psychology or instructor and program director permission.

Theory of psychological testing, statistical procedures and training in administration, scoring, and profiling of various tests of ability, achievement, interests, and personality.

$20 testing fee.

PSY 5043: Social Psychology

Cross-listed: SOC 5043

Prerequisite: BA or BS in Sociology or related field.

A study of the factors that influence the attitudes, behaviors, and cognition of the individual with a special emphasis on interactions among people.

PSY 5053: Psychology of Perception

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in psychology or instructor and program director permission.

The study of general perceptional processes. While the main senses will be covered, emphasis will be placed on visual functioning. The role of perception in organismic adaptation will be explored.

PSY 5073: Cognitive Psychology

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in psychology or instructor and program director permission.

A study of the basic principles of mental processes and their influences on behavior. Specifically, the course focuses on the conscious and unconscious processes involved in the acquisition, storage, transformation, and use of knowledge.

PSY 6003: Advanced Principles of Psychology I

Offered: Once a year

Prerequisites: Admission to graduate school or permission of psychology graduate coordinator.

This is the first course in a two course sequence covering the basic principles of psychology from an advanced standpoint. The course will emphasize the research the theories of psychology are based on, the logical and empirical adequacies of modern theories of psychology, and the application of psychology in the workplace and human service settings. Research, application, and other considerations for graduate psychology students will be emphasized. The core concepts covered in this course include history of psychology, research methods and statistics, biopsychology, learning, memory, cognition, language, consciousness, and cognitive abilities.

PSY 6013: Advanced Statistics

Cross-listed: SOC 6013

Prerequisites: PSY/SOC 2053 or equivalent and graduate standing in sociology or psychology or instructor and program director permission.

An advanced study of the concepts and techniques in descriptive and inferential statistics. Emphasis placed on the application of statistics and psychological research.

PSY 6023: Research Design

Prerequisite: PSY 6013 or equivalent and graduate standing in psychology or instructor and program director permission.

An advanced treatment of the design and analysis of psychological research. Emphasis on the logical foundations of experimental design.

PSY 6033: Personality Testing

Prerequisite: PSY 6013 or equivalent and graduate standing in psychology or instructor and program director permission.

Application of selected assessment devices. Emphasis on various objective tests including theoretical assumptions, scaling techniques, profile interpretation, and critical research topics.

PSY 6043: Psychopathology

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in psychology or instructor and program director permission.

Surveys classical and contemporary trends and theories of psychopathology; including methods, validity, and utility of classificatory schemes, properties of various disorders, as well as related assessment and treatment procedures.

PSY 6053: Advanced Development Psychology

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in psychology or instructor and program director permission.

Evaluation and assessment of the logical and empirical adequacies of modern theories of psychological development in relation to the maturation process of individuals.

PSY 6063: Advanced Physiological Psychology

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in psychology or instructor and program director permission.

An in-depth analysis of topics in physiological psychology. Emphasis is placed upon functional neuroanatomy of mammals to provide for understanding of systems for neural control of perception, orientation, motivation, learning, and complex processes.

PSY 6073: Personality Dynamics and Theories

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in psychology or instructor and program director permission.

An examination of selected writings and research of major personality theories.

PSY 6083: Seminar in Psychology

Prerequisites: PSY 6013, PSY 6023, nine hours of PSY at the 5000-6000 level, and permission of the department.

Concentrated analysis of a particular problem in psychology. Emphasis is placed upon the evaluation of current research and theory in the development of research ideas by the student. Topics to be determined by the Graduate Faculty Committee and the Program Director in Psychology.

Note: May be repeated for credit.

PSY 6091: Advanced Field Placement

Prerequisites: Successful completion of 30 graduate hours in psychology, six hours of thesis, and mutual consent of the faculty advisor, department, and industry supervisor.

The course is a jointly supervised field placement in an area diagnostic or treatment facility. Emphasis is on an integration of theory, methods, and graduate training, with on-the-job experience. The placement is designed for students who are considering work in facilities which provide psychological and/or social services.

Note: The purchase of Professional Liability Insurance is required.

Note: May be repeated for credit.

PSY 6092: Advanced Field Placement

Prerequisites: Successful completion of 30 graduate hours in psychology, six hours of thesis, and mutual consent of the faculty advisor, department, and industry supervisor.

The course is a jointly supervised field placement in an area diagnostic or treatment facility. Emphasis is on an integration of theory, methods, and graduate training, with on-the-job experience. The placement is designed for students who are considering work in facilities which provide psychological and/or social services.

Note: The purchase of Professional Liability Insurance is required.

Note: May be repeated for credit.

PSY 6093: Advanced Field Placement

Prerequisites: Successful completion of 30 graduate hours in psychology, six hours of thesis, and mutual consent of the faculty advisor, department, and industry supervisor.

The course is a jointly supervised field placement in an area diagnostic or treatment facility. Emphasis is on an integration of theory, methods, and graduate training, with on-the-job experience. The placement is designed for students who are considering work in facilities which provide psychological and/or social services.

Note: The purchase of Professional Liability Insurance is required.

Note: May be repeated for credit.

PSY 6103: Advanced Principles of Psychology II

Offered: Once a year

Prerequisites: Admission to graduate school or permission of psychology graduate coordinator.

This course is the second course in a two course sequence covering the basic principles of psychology from an advanced standpoint. The course will emphasize the research the theories of psychology are based on, the logical and empirical adequacies of modern theories of psychology, and the application of psychology in the workplace and human service settings. Research, application, and other considerations for graduate psychology students will be emphasized. The core concepts covered in this course include a review of research methods and statistics, motivation, emotion, human development, personality, health and stress, psychology disorders and treatments, social cognition and social psychology, I/O psychology, and neuropsychology.

PSY 6891: Independent Study

Open to graduate students who wish to pursue individual study or investigation of some facet of knowledge which complements the purpose of the University's graduate program. Students will be required to plan their studies and prepare formal written reports of their findings.

Note: The selected topic may not constitute any duplication of study leading to the accomplishment of a thesis.

Note: May be repeated for credit.

PSY 6892: Independent Study

Open to graduate students who wish to pursue individual study or investigation of some facet of knowledge which complements the purpose of the University's graduate program. Students will be required to plan their studies and prepare formal written reports of their findings.

Note: The selected topic may not constitute any duplication of study leading to the accomplishment of a thesis.

Note: May be repeated for credit.

PSY 6893: Independent Study

Open to graduate students who wish to pursue individual study or investigation of some facet of knowledge which complements the purpose of the University's graduate program. Students will be required to plan their studies and prepare formal written reports of their findings.

Note: The selected topic may not constitute any duplication of study leading to the accomplishment of a thesis.

Note: May be repeated for credit.

PSY 6894: Independent Study

Open to graduate students who wish to pursue individual study or investigation of some facet of knowledge which complements the purpose of the University's graduate program. Students will be required to plan their studies and prepare formal written reports of their findings.

Note: The selected topic may not constitute any duplication of study leading to the accomplishment of a thesis.

Note: May be repeated for credit.

PSY 6991: Project or Thesis Research Continuation

This course allows students additional time to research and compose their capstone project/portfolio.

Note: May be repeated for credit.

PSY 6993: Thesis Research

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in psychology and permission of thesis advisor.

Directed research on a thesis topic selected by the student in consultation with a supervising professor.

Note: May be repeated for credit.

PSY 6994: Thesis Research

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in psychology and permission of thesis advisor.

Directed research on a thesis topic selected by the student in consultation with a supervising professor.

Note: May be repeated for credit.

PSY 6995: Thesis Research

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in psychology and permission of thesis advisor.

Directed research on a thesis topic selected by the student in consultation with a supervising professor.

Note: May be repeated for credit.

PSY 6996: Thesis Research

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in psychology and permission of thesis advisor.

Directed research on a thesis topic selected by the student in consultation with a supervising professor.

Note: May be repeated for credit.

RDNG 5023: Literacy Curriculum Design and Analysis

Prerequisites: DYS 5003, DYS 5013, DYS 5023 or by permission.

Analysis of the different perspectives and dichotomies in reading curriculum analysis, evaluation, and implementation. This course will prepare reading specialists to plan, organize, assess, and supervise/coach reading programs in school systems. Candidates will use current research to evaluate issues and trends in curriculum planning, program assessment, and staff development.

RDNG 5053: Literacy, Technology, and the Reading Environment

Prerequisites: DYS 5003, DYS 5013, DYS 5023, or special permission of the program director.

This course focuses on literacy, technology, and the reading environment. Understanding the components of technology and its relationship to best practices when teaching and integrating reading instruction is imperative for the master's of reading candidate. This course will use the science of reading as a foundation including: phonics, phonemic awareness, comprehension, writing, fluency, vocabulary, and alphabetic principle. Analysis of new skills gained in this course will be applied to better support teacher and student growth.

RDNG 6043: Multicultural Literacy, Language, and Culture

This course focuses on the relationship between literacy, language, and culture in multilingual and multicultural settings. This course provides opportunities for students to investigate important theoretical perspectives informing research in literacy, language, and culture. Students examine the relationship between child and young adult multicultural literature, language use, instructional activities, and the development of literacy, language, and culture in multilingual and multicultural settings. In this course students will have the opportunity to examine and develop their personal philosophy of literacy, language, and culture in linguistically and culturally diverse settings. They will also be encouraged to carefully examine their beliefs and attitudes about their own language and about the language of others who live around them. Being aware of their beliefs and attitudes will help them become more tolerant of the variation in language use from one individual to the next and from one group to the next. It will also help you better understand the change the language constantly undergoes in personal and social use.

RDNG 6086: Reading Practicum

Prerequisites: Completion of required courses in the program

In this practicum candidates will apply their knowledge of language and literacy theories, research and best practices to an ongoing assessment-instruction process. Candidates work intensively with an individual or a small group of primary, intermediate, or secondary struggling readers at a public, charter, or parochial school daily for 12 weeks. This course is designed to provide both a theoretical base for the causes, diagnosis, and treatment of reading difficulties as well as a practical hands-on opportunity for graduate students to administer a battery of tests to the individual(s), interpret the results, and build a case report that makes corrective recommendations based on the results. Roles of Reading Specialists and Literacy Coaches will be examined.

SEED 5333: Teaching Reading and Study Strategies in the Content Area

This course is designed to provide pre-service and in-service teachers and administrators with a knowledge of reading factors as they relate to various disciplines. Content of the course includes estimating students' reading ability, techniques for vocabulary, questioning strategies, and developing reading-related study skills.

SEED 6881: Workshop

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

The workshop will require the equivalency of fifteen clock hours of instruction per credit hour.

SEED 6882: Workshop

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

The workshop will require the equivalency of fifteen clock hours of instruction per credit hour.

SEED 6883: Workshop

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

The workshop will require the equivalency of fifteen clock hours of instruction per credit hour.

SEED 6891: Independent Study

Open to graduate students who wish to pursue individual study or investigation of some facet of knowledge which complements the purpose of the University's graduate program. Students will be required to plan their studies and prepare formal written reports of their findings.

Note: The selected topic may not constitute any duplication of study leading to the accomplishment of a thesis.

SEED 6892: Independent Study

Open to graduate students who wish to pursue individual study or investigation of some facet of knowledge which complements the purpose of the University's graduate program. Students will be required to plan their studies and prepare formal written reports of their findings.

Note: The selected topic may not constitute any duplication of study leading to the accomplishment of a thesis.

SEED 6893: Independent Study

Open to graduate students who wish to pursue individual study or investigation of some facet of knowledge which complements the purpose of the University's graduate program. Students will be required to plan their studies and prepare formal written reports of their findings.

Note: The selected topic may not constitute any duplication of study leading to the accomplishment of a thesis.

SEED 6894: Independent Study

Open to graduate students who wish to pursue individual study or investigation of some facet of knowledge which complements the purpose of the University's graduate program. Students will be required to plan their studies and prepare formal written reports of their findings.

Note: The selected topic may not constitute any duplication of study leading to the accomplishment of a thesis.

SEED 6991: Thesis Research

Directed research on a thesis topic. If the six (6) hour thesis (SEED 6993 and 6993 in the student's area of specialization) has not been completed during the semester(s) of enrollment, the student must register for SEED 6991 during subsequent semesters in which he/she is receiving faculty assistance with the thesis and/or using University library facilities.

SEED 6993: Thesis Research

Directed research on a thesis topic selected by the student in consultation with a supervising professor.

SOC 5003: Minority Relations

Prerequisite: BA or BS in Sociology or related field.

A study of minority groups with emphasis upon discrimination, socio-historical characteristics, and processes of social change. Minorities considered include racial, ethnic, and gender.

SOC 5013: Drugs in Society

Cross-listed: CJ 5013

Prerequisite: BA or BS in Sociology or related field.

This course presents a comprehensive study of the history and prohibition of drugs use in the United States, as well as the effects of drugs on society in the form of crime, prison, and treatment. The main focus of this class is on the history of drug use, how certain drugs become illegal, and the intended and unintended consequences of drug prohibition for communities and society.

SOC 5043: Social Psychology

Cross-listed: PSY 5043

Prerequisite: BA or BS in Sociology or related field.

A study of the factors that influence the attitudes, behaviors, and cognition of the individual with a special emphasis on interactions among people.

SOC 5053: Sociology of Health and Illness

Prerequisite: BA or BS in Sociology or related field.

An in-depth look at the sociology of health and illness including an examination of the social structures related to the medical system, the social psychology of health and illness, a comparative analysis of sick role behavior, as well as the study of social causes and consequences of health and illness.

SOC 5063: Social Stratification

Prerequisite: BA or BS in Sociology or related field.

A study of social class and consequences for society and individuals.

SOC 5183: Social Gerontology

Prerequisite: BA or BS in Sociology or a related field

An introduction to the sociology of aging: content provides general and specific knowledge regarding the aging process. Implications for economic, political, and family institutions are emphasized.

SOC 6013: Advanced Statistics

Cross-listed: PSY 6013

Prerequisite: PSY/SOC 2053 or equivalent and graduate standing in sociology or psychology or instructor and program director permission.

An advanced study of the concepts and techniques in descriptive and inferential statistics. Emphasis placed on the application of statistics and psychological research.

SOC 6023: Advanced Sociological Theory

Offered: Fall

Prerequisite: BA or BS in Sociology or related field

This course provides an in-depth survey of the classical social theorists and theoretical traditions in the 19th and 20th centuries. Attention will be directed to major thinkers and schools of thought which are responsible for the emergence of social theory (and the field of sociology). Contemporary theorists who have had a major impact on the discipline will also be examined.

SOC 6033: Advanced Methodology

Prerequisite: BA or BS in Sociology or related field.

An introduction to research methodology, with emphasis upon conceptualization, design, and processes.

SOC 6043: Evaluation and Assessment

Prerequisite: BA or BS in Sociology or related field.

An Introduction to the logic and methods of modern social program evaluation and assessment. Emphasizing the benefits of applied sociological methods, the course reviews nonprofit program measurement with a focus on costs and effects.

SOC 6053: Advanced Topics in Criminal Justice

Prerequisite: BA or BS in Sociology or related field.

This course offers specialized instruction in an area of criminal justice not otherwise covered in the curriculum.

Note: The focus of the course will vary from offering to offering, thus students may take the course more than once.

SOC 6063: Advanced Topics in Gerontology

Prerequisite: BA or BS in Sociology or related field.

This course offers specialized instruction in an area of gerontology no otherwise covered in the curriculum.

Note: The focus of this course will vary from offering to offering, thus students may take the course more than once.

SOC 6891: Independent Study

Prerequisite: Graduate student status with successful completion of all 12 hours of required coursework in the program.

Open to graduate students who wish to pursue individual study or investigation of some facet of knowledge which complements the purpose of the University's graduate program. Students will be required to plan their studies and prepare formal written reports of their findings.

Note: The selected topic may not constitute any duplication of study leading to the accomplishment of a thesis.

Note: The focus of the course will vary from offering to offering, thus students may take the course more than once.

SOC 6892: Independent Study

Prerequisite: Graduate student status with successful completion of all 12 hours of required coursework in the program.

Open to graduate students who wish to pursue individual study or investigation of some facet of knowledge which complements the purpose of the University's graduate program. Students will be required to plan their studies and prepare formal written reports of their findings.

Note: The selected topic may not constitute any duplication of study leading to the accomplishment of a thesis.

Note: The focus of the course will vary from offering to offering, thus students may take the course more than once.

SOC 6893: Independent Study

Prerequisite: Graduate student status with successful completion of all 12 hours of required coursework in the program.

Open to graduate students who wish to pursue individual study or investigation of some facet of knowledge which complements the purpose of the University's graduate program. Students will be required to plan their studies and prepare formal written reports of their findings.

Note: The selected topic may not constitute any duplication of study leading to the accomplishment of a thesis.

Note: The focus of the course will vary from offering to offering, thus students may take the course more than once.

SOC 6894: Independent Study

Prerequisite: Graduate student status with successful completion of all 12 hours of required coursework in the program.

Open to graduate students who wish to pursue individual study or investigation of some facet of knowledge which complements the purpose of the University's graduate program. Students will be required to plan their studies and prepare formal written reports of their findings.

Note: The selected topic may not constitute any duplication of study leading to the accomplishment of a thesis.

Note: The focus of the course will vary from offering to offering, thus students may take the course more than once.

SOC 6991: Thesis Research

Prerequisite: Graduate student status with successful completion of all 12 hours of required coursework in the program.

This course is designed to allow the student specific time to research, write, and complete the thesis.

Note: The focus of the course will vary from offering to offering, thus students may take the course more than once.

SOC 6992: Thesis Research

Prerequisite: Graduate student status with successful completion of all 12 hours of required coursework in the program.

This course is designed to allow the student specific time to research, write, and complete the thesis.

Note: The focus of the course will vary from offering to offering, thus students may take the course more than once.

SOC 6993: Thesis Research

Prerequisite: Graduate student status with successful completion of all 12 hours of required coursework in the program.

This course is designed to allow the student specific time to research, write, and complete the thesis.

Note: The focus of the course will vary from offering to offering, thus students may take the course more than once.

SPAN 5023: Introduction to Spanish Linguistics

The purpose of this course is to provide graduate students with the fundamental knowledge of Spanish linguistics as the basis for future application of linguistic principles. This course explores Spanish phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax and semantics.

SPAN 5203: Short Story

An analysis of Spanish-language short stories.

Note: May be repeated for credit after completion of SPAN 4203 if course content differs.

SPAN 5213: Spanish Literature

A survey of the literature of Spain with readings from representative works.

Note: May not be taken for credit after completion of SPAN 4213.

SPAN 5223: Spanish-American Literature

A survey of Spanish-American literature with readings from representative works.

Note: May not be taken for credit after completion of SPAN 4223.

SPAN 5283: Seminar in Spanish

Selected topics on language, literature, or culture in the Americas and Spain.

Note: May be taken for credit after SPAN 4283 or SPAN 5283 if content differs.

SPAN 5803: Spanish-Language Film

An introduction to Spanish-language film theory and major films.

Note: May be taken for credit after SPAN 4803 if content differs.

SPAN 6003: Introduction to the M.A. in Spanish

The emphasis of this course is on analytical reading and academic writing. The course provides the student with research and analytical tools used in the humanities in order to develop the ability to handle larger expository and argumentative units and to deal more effectively with the writing process. Topics vary from year-to-year.

SPAN 6023: Literary Theory

Examination of the fundamental concepts of literary theory and criticism and their applications to Spanish texts, poetry, narrative, and drama.

SPAN 6063: Spanish American Literature and Culture

The course will examine Latin American literature from the turn of the century modernism to present time. This will include the multiple aspects of modernism, realism and regionalism, post-modernist poetry, contemporary prose, and theatre. Specific themes will be studied such as man versus nature, man versus society, gender issues, and the representation of women. The use of art and film will also be studied.

SPAN 6133: Seminar in Spanish Literature

Seminar in Spanish Literature will be a seminar-style course that examines major writers in Spanish literature. The course will examine each work within its structure. Particular attention will be paid to social, intellectual, and existential aspects.

Note: Course may be repeated if content differs.

SPAN 6163: Spanish Literature and Culture

A study of Peninsular literature, emphasizing works that give representative expression to the thought and cultural patterns of their times.

SPAN 6283: Seminar in Spanish

Selected topics on language, literature, or culture in the Americas and Spain.

Note: Course may be repeated if content differs.

SPAN 6403: Advanced Spanish Grammar

This course is designed to provide more advanced grammatical and syntactical features, increased ability with idiomatic expressions, and vocabulary enlargement.

SPAN 6503: History of the Spanish Language

An examination of different aspects involved in the development of the Spanish language. Topics to be considered may include, among others, the evolution of different linguistic systems of Spanish and the socio-cultural factors and context that influenced its development. The course will entail analysis of texts that reflect changes in language. Usage and attitudes toward language.

SPAN 6701: Teaching College Spanish

Teaching college Spanish is a graduate-level introduction to second language learning/teaching theory, methodology, and practice. Supervised teaching, preparation of instructional and testing materials, and practice in evaluation. Readings and bibliographic work in second language learning/teaching theory, practice, and research.

Note: Required of all graduate assistants.

SPAN 6883: Workshop

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

The workshop will require the equivalency of fifteen clock hours of instruction per credit hour.

SPAN 6891: Independent Theory

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor and department head

Open to graduate students who wish to pursue individual study or investigation of some facet of knowledge which complements the purpose of the University's graduate program. Students will be required to plan their studies and prepare formal written reports of their findings.

SPAN 6892: Independent Theory

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor and department head

Open to graduate students who wish to pursue individual study or investigation of some facet of knowledge which complements the purpose of the University's graduate program. Students will be required to plan their studies and prepare formal written reports of their findings.

SPAN 6893: Independent Theory

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor and department head

Open to graduate students who wish to pursue individual study or investigation of some facet of knowledge which complements the purpose of the University's graduate program. Students will be required to plan their studies and prepare formal written reports of their findings.

SPAN 6894: Independent Theory

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor and department head

Open to graduate students who wish to pursue individual study or investigation of some facet of knowledge which complements the purpose of the University's graduate program. Students will be required to plan their studies and prepare formal written reports of their findings.

SPAN 6991: Project or Thesis Research Continuation

This course allows students additional time to research and compose their capstone project/portfolio.

SPAN 6993: Thesis Research

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor or department head.

Directed research on a thesis topic selected by the student in consultation with a supervising professor.

SPED 5003: Characteristics of Children with Exceptionalities

Chronically disabling conditions that occur frequently in children with educational handicaps are reviewed. Emphasis is on early identification and detection of at-risk or failure-to-thrive children.

SPED 5013: Assessment of Children with Exceptional Learning Needs

A study of assessment as it pertains to individuals with exceptional learning needs. An overview of the legal and ethical issues involved in assessment. The course provides an examination of the uses of formal and informal assessment to identify the supports and adaptations needed by individuals with exceptional learning needs in order to participate in the general curriculum.

SPED 5023: Planning Instruction for Children with Exceptional Learning Needs, Grades K-6

This course is a hands-on course in planning for the instruction of children, particularly children in grades K-6, with disabilities. Actual policies and paperwork mandated by the Arkansas Department of Education will be used in teaching how to develop an individualized plan for a special needs child. The focus is on disciplines, strategies, and materials involved with special needs collaboration, planning, and implementation.

SPED 5033: Working with Families of Children with Exceptional Learning Needs

This course is a brief examination of the impact of children and adolescents with special needs on the roles within the family. Study will also briefly examine the impact of specialized educational programs and their role in aiding and assisting families.

SPED 5043: Supervised Practicum

This class is a supervised participation in an appropriate school, or institution dealing with early childhood exceptionalities, and providing a practical, hands-on application of teaching methods and ideas.

SPED 5053: Planning Instruction for Children with Exceptionalities, 7th - 12th Grades

Offered: Once per calendar year

This course is a hands-on course in planning for the instruction of children with exceptionalities in the Middle and Secondary schools. Actual policies and paperwork mandated by the Arkansas Department of Education will be used in teaching how to develop an individualized plan for a special needs child. The focus is on disciplines, strategies, and materials involved with special needs collaboration, planning, and implementation.

SPED 5063: Supervised Practicum, Grades K - 12

Offered: Once per calendar year

Prerequisites: SPED 5003, SPED 5013, SPED 5053, SPED 5033, EDFD 6053, or advisor approval.

This class is a supervised participation in an appropriate school, or institution working with children with exceptional learning needs in an Elementary, Middle Level, and Secondary setting. This course will provide a practical-hands-on application of teaching methods and ideas.

SPED 5073: Planning Instruction in an Early Childhood Setting

This course is a hands-on course in planning developmentally appropriate instruction for all children with an emphasis on exceptionalities birth to K. Actual policies and paperwork mandated by the Arkansas Department of Education will be used in teaching how to develop an individualized plan for a special needs child. The focus is on disciplines, strategies, and materials involved with special need collaboration, planning, and implementation.

SPED 5083: Supervised Practicum B - K

Prerequisites: SPED 5003, SPED 5013, SPED 5073, and SPED 5033

This class is a supervised participation in an appropriate school, or institution working with children with exceptional learning needs in an early childhood special education setting. This course will provide a practical-hands-on application of teaching methods and ideas for children in the birth to kindergarten age range.

STAT 5113: Categorical Data Analysis

Offered: Fall

Statistical tools to analyze univariate and multivariate categorical responses. Emphasis is given to Generalized Linear Models, including logistic regression and loglinear models.

STAT 5153: EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN ANALYSIS

This course introduces students to both design and analysis of experiments as well as statistical computing. Emphasis is given to develop an understanding of experimental methods and major experimental designs. Students will be required to design and carry out an experiment, use a current statistical software package to analyze the data, and make inferences based upon the analysis.

STAT 5383: Machine Learning

Offered: Fall

The focus of the course is an accessible overview of the field of machine learning and provide the students with valuable hands-on experience by illustrating how to implement each of the machine learning methods using Python. Topics covered include Decision Tree, Support Vector Machines, and the kernel methods, AdaBoost and GBDT method, Logistic regression, and neural network, and more.

STAT 5393: Statistical Learning

Offered: Spring

This course is directed towards advanced undergraduates or master's students in statistical or related quantitative fields. The focus of the course is an accessible overview of the field of statistical learning and provide the students with valuable hands-on experience by illustrating how to implement each of the statistical learning methods using R or other statistical programming language. Topics covered include: regression techniques, classification methods, linear model selection and regularization, unsupervised learning, and more.

SCS 6013: Measurement and Evaluation in Strength and Conditioning

Prerequisites: Prerequisites: B or better in the following courses: PE 6033, PE 6053, and PE 4523.

An advanced investigation of measurement and assessment theory along with the study of various test and measurement protocols used in strength and conditioning, exercise, and sport. Testing in the cognitive, psychomotor, health-fitness, and affective domains will be reviewed. Criteria for selection of tests including validity, reliability, objectivity, and utility. Basic statistical methods as applied to strength and conditioning with particular emphasis on interpretation and evaluation of results will be emphasized.

SCS 6023: Scientific Foundations of Strength and Conditioning

Prerequisites: Prerequisites: B or better in the following courses: PE 6033 and PE 6053.

An intensive advanced course integrating the principles of Exercise Physiology, Biomechanics, and Exercise Psychology as they relate to strength and conditioning programs.

SCS 6033: Strength and Conditioning Program Design and Development

Prerequisites: B or better in the following courses: PE 3663, PE 4033, and WS 4023.

An advanced course that integrates scientific principles and practical applications related to designing a safe and effective strength and conditioning training program. Tenets from Exercise Physiology, Biomechanics, and Exercise Psychology will be reviewed as design principles are covered.

SCS 6043: Techniques for Development of Hypertrophy, Strength, and Power

Prerequisite: A grade of B or better in PE 6033 or PE 6053.

An intensive course designed to assist trainers and coaches in developing the ability to teach proper resistance training techniques. Scientific research dealing with the development of hypertrophy, strength, and power will be explored.

Note: This is a 5 week summer course with 3 weeks spent on-campus.

SCS 6053: Techniques for Development of Speed, Agility, Reaction Time and Endurance

Prerequisite: A grade of B or better in PE 6033 or PE 6053.

An intensive course designed to assist trainers and coaches in teaching various techniques designed to enhance flexibility, speed, agility, reaction time, and glycolytic and aerobic endurance.

Note: This is a 5 week summer course with 3 weeks spent on-campus.

SCS 6063: Trends in Sports Nutrition and Metabolism

An advanced study of nutrition as a means to enhance performance in exercise and sport.

Note: This is a 5 week summer course with 3 weeks spent on-campus.

SCS 6083: Instructional Strategies for Strength Coaches

This course focuses on effective sport pedagogy. Students will gain experience in a range of pedagogical skills including designing learning experiences, task presentation, content analysis, strategies for developing the learning environment, assessment of athlete/client performance, and systematic observation techniques for analyzing and improving teaching.

SCS 6093: Exercise Science Seminar

This course is designed to enhance the student's ability to critically analyze and evaluate contemporary strength and conditioning literature.

SCS 6103: Professional Project

Prerequisite: Requires the prior completion of 27 hours towards the SCS degree. The professional project should be developed and must be approved by the Graduate Program Director prior to enrolling in this course.

The Professional Project is the capstone course for the Master of Strength and Conditioning Studies degree, serving as the integrative culmination of the program. The student is responsible for producing a substantial piece of independent research, a significant professional creative project, or a meaningful internship.

SAA 6023: Introduction to Student Affairs Administration

This course will provide the student with an understanding of the breadth of college student personnel work and introduce the student to the theory and practice of student personnel work as a profession.

SAA 6033: Student Development Theory

This is an introductory course in college student development theory. Students will be provided with a foundation to understand student development theory and how to apply it in a practical way in their work with college students.

SAA 6043: College Students and Diversity

This course provides an overview of literature and research pertaining to student populations, characteristics, and identities, and how these affect students' college experiences. The knowledge and experiences shared will encourage institutional efforts to engage all student populations while also supporting values concerning equity, diversity, inclusivity, and justice.

SAA 6053: Legal Issues for Student Affairs Administrators

This course is designed to teach a process of legal analysis. Benchmark cases will be used to illuminate basic issues. The student will be exposed to a range of administrative problems at the postsecondary level that entail legal implications. The course experiences should ultimately help current and prospective administrators to envision the legal dimensions of collegiate-level decision processes.

SAA 6063: Student Affairs Administration Capstone Seminar

Prerequisite: A minimum of 24 hours must be earned toward program requirements.

This capstone seminar is designed to provide graduating college student personnel students with the opportunity to discuss current issues in student affairs practice with the goal of preparing them as new professionals in the field.

SAA 6073: Counseling Theories and Helping Skills

Emphasizes major counseling theories, techniques, and basic helping skills that are commonly referenced in student affairs work.

SAA 6083: Practicum I in Student Affairs Administration

Prerequisite: A minimum of 18 hours must be earned toward program requirements.

This course provides students the opportunity to participate in a supervised professional experience. The student will process, discuss, and share experiences gained during the practical internship to integrate the experiences with the student development theory.

SAA 6093: Practicum II in Student Affairs Administration

Prerequisite: Successful completion of SAA 6083.

A practical, applied course where students will participate actively in a supervised professional experience. The student is expected to process, discuss, and share experiences gained during the professional experience and to integrate those experiences with the student development theory.

SAA 6113: Research Design and Analysis

The student will learn to interpret, analyze, and evaluate research reports in professional journals and will understand the principles which underlie effective scientific investigation.

SAA 6123: Assessment and Evaluation in Higher Education

An in-depth survey of the outcomes assessment and institutional effectiveness movement and including assessment techniques, instruments selection, analysis of assessment data, and reporting of assessment findings.

SAA 6133: Ethical Leadership in Higher Education

A study of how educational policy is developed through micro and macro political elements, an examination of ethical and value issues confronting educational leaders, and a demonstration of how individual values drive ethical behavior and ethical decisions.

SAA 6143: Administration in Student Affairs

Administration in Student Affairs is a required course for the Masters of Science in Student Affairs Administration degree. The course provides an overview of the relevant theories in the management, organization, and leadership of institutions of higher education, particularly in areas of student affairs administration. Emphasis will be placed on the application of theory and knowledge to administrative practices of human resource management, financial and budgeting, and facilities management. Students will also examine student affairs units in their functional contexts, including, but not limited to, such areas as admissions, financial aid, orientation, counseling, academic advising, support services, residence life, judicial services, campus activities, Greek life, multicultural and international student affairs, disability services, service learning, religious programs, and commuter and non-traditional student services.

SAA 6153: Advising Student Groups

This course is designed for Student Affairs professionals to gain an understanding of advising student groups and organizations on a college campus. The course will highlight student development theories that introduce group dynamics and student leadership. The course will review the role of the advisor, risk management, leadership development of student, practical skills and techniques that will assist in the formation of new student groups, and will provide valuable resources to help future college administrators with their role as a leader of a student group/organization.

SAA 6163: Academic Advising

This course will provide an overview of the foundations of academic advising as an essential component of student success and retention programs at higher education institutions. The course will focus on advising models, application, and best practices in delivery of advising models.

SAA 6173: Career Advising

Offered: At least once/academic year.

This elective SAA course will provide an overview of the foundations of career advising. Students will learn career development theories, career advising interventions and practices, career assessment and planning tools, and sources of career information and technology designed to assist individuals and groups in lifelong career and lifestyle planning.

SAA 6203: American Higher Education in Transition

An overview of the history, philosophy, purposes, and functions of higher education in the United States. The purpose of the course is to familiarize students with the events, issues, and ongoing debates that have shaped and continue to shape higher education in the United States.

SAA 6213: Diversity and Inclusion in Student Affairs

This course will address diversity issues in higher education and student affairs practice. Topics to be examined include but are not limited to diversity in recruitment and retention, programming, student organization and activities and the overall campus climate.

SAA 6283: Advising Practicum

Prerequisite: SAA 6073 or approval of the course instructor.

Students will gain a conceptual understanding of advising in post-secondary institutions by actively participating in a supervised experience. Students will log a minimum of 100 clock hours in an approved site where they will observe and participate in advising (academic, career, or advising student groups) related services.

Note: This course will be part of the required sequence of courses for those students pursing the Graduate Certificate in Advising.

SAA 6881: Special Problems (Workshop) in Student Affairs Administration

Special Problems (Workshop) in SAA is an elective course that will provide a study of contemporary issues or problems associated with the field of student affairs and higher education in general. Students will explore these issues, the impact they have on the field of student affairs, and to be introduced to best practices that can be applied to address the issues from a developmental point of view.

Note: Since the topic for the workshop will vary each time offered, a student can repeat this course, earning a maximum number of six (6) graduate hours of credit.

SAA 6882: Special Problems (Workshop) in Student Affairs Administration

Special Problems (Workshop) in SAA is an elective course that will provide a study of contemporary issues or problems associated with the field of student affairs and higher education in general. Students will explore these issues, the impact they have on the field of student affairs, and to be introduced to best practices that can be applied to address the issues from a developmental point of view.

Note: Since the topic for the workshop will vary each time offered, a student can repeat this course, earning a maximum number of six (6) graduate hours of credit.

SAA 6883: Special Problems (Workshop) in Student Affairs Administration

Special Problems (Workshop) in SAA is an elective course that will provide a study of contemporary issues or problems associated with the field of student affairs and higher education in general. Students will explore these issues, the impact they have on the field of student affairs, and to be introduced to best practices that can be applied to address the issues from a developmental point of view.

Note: Since the topic for the workshop will vary each time offered, a student can repeat this course, earning a maximum number of six (6) graduate hours of credit.

SAA 6893: Independent Study

Open to graduate students who wish to pursue individual study or investigation of some facet of knowledge which complements the purpose of the University's graduate program. Students will be required to plan their studies and prepare formal written reports of their findings.

Note: The selected topic may not constitute any duplication of study leading to the accomplishment of a thesis. This course may be repeated for credit.

TESL 5023: Second Language Acquisition

An introduction to the major theories of language acquisition and their application to the instruction of English language learners.

Note: May not be taken for credit after completion of ENGL 4023 or ENGL 5023.

Note: TESL 5023 may be used toward fulfilling the Arkansas ESL Endorsement.

TESL 5703: Teaching English as a Second Language

An introduction to the principles and methods in teaching English as a second Language.

Note: May not be taken for credit after completion of ENGL 4703 or ENGL 5703.

Note: TESL 5703 may be used toward fulfilling the Arkansas ESL Endorsement.

TESL 5713: ESL Assessment

An introduction to the tools and procedures for evaluating the language proficiency and development of English language learners.

Note: May not be taken for credit after completion of ENGL 4713 or ENGL 5713.

Note: TESL 5713 may be used toward fulfilling the Arkansas ESL Endorsement..

TESL 5723: Teaching People of Other Cultures

An introduction to the complex relationship of language and culture and its impact on teaching English language learners.

Note: May not be taken for credit after completion of ENGL 4723 or ENGL 5723.

Note: TESL 5723 may be used toward fulfilling the Arkansas ESL Endorsement.

TESL 6003: Linguistics for ESL Teachers

Examination of phonology, syntax, and semantics in a variety of languages, including the study of language changes, as well as regional and social variations. This course will provide students with linguistic insights into language usage, writing, reading, spelling, and vocabulary.

TESL 6013: Modern English Grammar and Usage

Cross-listed: TESL 6013

Investigation of the structure of American English with an emphasis on practical and pedagogical applications.

Note: Cannot be taken for credit after completion of ENGL 6013.

TESL 6023: Language and Society

Examination of the interrelationship of language, culture, and non-verbal communication and the role each of these plays in shaping thoughts and attitudes. Students will also investigate the interactions among language, social institutions, cultural beliefs, and individual behavior and the language variations associated with geography, socio-economic class, age, and gender.

TESL 6063: Instructional Strategies in Content Areas

An introduction to teaching techniques that address the academic needs of English language learners in the content areas.

TESL 6083: Seminar in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages

Course content will vary.

Note: May be repeated for credit if course content varies.

TESL 6123: Teaching Writing to English Language Learners

A study of the theories, methods, and strategies for teaching writing skills to English language learners.

TESL 6133: Teaching Listening and Speaking to English Language Learners

A study of the theories, methods, and strategies for teaching listening and oral skills to English Language Learners.

TESL 6143: Teaching Reading to English Language Learners

Study of the theories, methods, and strategies for teaching reading skills to English language learners.

TESL 6863: TESOL Practicum

Prerequisite: Completion of 27 hours required for the MA degree or permission of the program director.

TESL 6863 is an applied capstone course, designed for teachers to document their instruction of ESOL students, based on the 12 national ENL (English as a New Language) standards.

TESL 6891: Independent Study

Open to graduate students who wish to pursue individual study or investigation of some facet of knowledge which complements the University's graduate program.

Note: May be repeated for credit.

TESL 6892: Independent Study

Open to graduate students who wish to pursue individual study or investigation of some facet of knowledge which complements the University's graduate program.

Note: May be repeated for credit.

TESL 6893: Independent Study

Open to graduate students who wish to pursue individual study or investigation of some facet of knowledge which complements the University's graduate program.

Note: May be repeated for credit.

TESL 6894: Independent Study

Open to graduate students who wish to pursue individual study or investigation of some facet of knowledge which complements the University's graduate program.

Note: May be repeated for credit.

TESL 6991: Project or Thesis Research Continuation

This course allows students additional time to research and compose their capstone project/portfolio.

Note: May be repeated for credit.

MTLL 6003: School Organization and Leadership for Teacher Leaders

This course will examine how schools are organized and supported from the federal level to the local school. The concepts of leadership and its role at all levels will be a focal part of this study. Students will begin to examine their leadership style and dispositions.

MTLL 6113: Action Research and Data Analysis for School and Classroom Use

This course will focus on the analysis of data with emphasis on student achievement and whole school accountability. Data driven decision-making will be examined. Students will look at research methodologies with a focus on action research and the role of the leader in facilitating action research in the field.

MTLL 6123: Instructional Leadership for the Master Teacher

This course will focus on the "hard and soft" skills of instructional leadership. The teaching and learning process will be the focus of student work. Students will learn how to observe and coach for excellence in teaching and learning. The reflective practice model will serve as a basis for theory and skill development.

MTLL 6133: Basic Elements of Curriculum

This course will focus on national, state, and local curriculum standards. Students will gain an understanding of the alignment issues of curriculum, instruction, and assessment as they prepare a curriculum artifact based on the principles of curriculum.

MTLL 6143: Organizational Change and the Role of the Master Teacher

This course will examine theories of change looking at research and case studies of first and second order change. Students will gain strategies as leaders of change as schools work to move closer to higher performance. Students will study a current change taking place in a school.

MTLL 6152: Professional Portfolio for the Master Teacher

This course will examine the role of the student portfolio and the teaching portfolio. The main focus will be the professional portfolio for the candidate's completion of their degree program.

MTLL 6202: Professionalization of Teaching for the Master Teacher

This course will examine the philosophies and historical perspectives of education for the purpose of reflection on individual teaching and learning practices. Students will purposefully explore and define who they are as a master teacher and what core beliefs impact teaching and learning in their classroom.

MTLL 6223: Teaching and Learning for the Master Teacher

This course will explore theories and best practices that can lead to improved student performance.

MTLL 6233: Advanced Teaching and Learning

Prerequisite: MTLL 6223.

In this course the graduate student pursuing the NTL option will continue the exploration of teaching and learning theories and research-based classroom practices to promote improved student learning.

MTLL 6242: Cognitive Coaching and Mentoring for the Master Teacher

Students will develop the necessary skills that will enable the master teacher to be a peer learning coach and mentor for the inductee, peer, and/or marginal teacher.

MTLL 6252: Communication Advocacy & Policy Development for the Master Teacher

Effective means of communicating classroom related issues, in order to be an advocate for teaching and learning practices that make a difference in teaching and learning, will be examined in this course as well as ways for the teacher to impact policy development at the district, state, and national levels.

MTLL 6253: Advanced Curriculum Design Practicum for the Master Teacher

This course will focus on advanced methods of curriculum design. The role of the teacher leader in the curriculum development process will be explored and acquisition of the skills necessary to facilitate, implement, assess, and sustain the process will be learned.

MTLL 6262: Action Research Practicum for the Master Teacher

This course will focus on the implementation of the student action research design, developed in the initial research course, Action Research and Data Analysis for School and Classroom Use. Analysis of field data from this research will be aggregated with emphasis on student achievement. Effective communication of the research results to various audiences will also be explored.

MTLL 6271: Resource Acquisition for the Master Teacher

This course will provide the opportunity for students to discuss, explore, and acquire skills that will supplement means to augment classroom resources in addition to the allocated budget.

MTLL 6292: Evaluation of Classroom Learning for the Master Teacher

Assessment, to evaluate student performance, will be explored with the emphasis being on authentic assessments.

MTLL 6551: Internship Practicum

The purpose of the Intern Practicum is to provide the Non-Traditional (NTL) graduate student with an opportunity to apply theory and practice into experiences in the classroom.

Note: A student can repeat this course, earning a maximum number of four (4) graduate hours of credit

$50 per credit hour internship practicum fee.

MTLL 6552: Internship Practicum

The purpose of the Intern Practicum is to provide the Non-Traditional (NTL) graduate student with an opportunity to apply theory and practice into experiences in the classroom.

Note: A student can repeat this course, earning a maximum number of four (4) graduate hours of credit

$100 per credit hour internship practicum fee.

MTLL 6553: Internship Practicum

The purpose of the Intern Practicum is to provide the Non-Traditional (NTL) graduate student with an opportunity to apply theory and practice into experiences in the classroom.

$150 per credit hour internship practicum fee.

MTLL 6554: Internship Practicum

The purpose of the Intern Practicum is to provide the Non-Traditional (NTL) graduate student with an opportunity to apply theory and practice into experiences in the classroom.

$200 per credit hour internship practicum fee.

TH 5283: Children's Theatre: Techniques and Practicum

Offered: Summer

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

The philosophy of teaching acting to children, in theory and practice. The course is designed for drama majors, teachers, and others interested in child development. The semester equivalent of two hours of class lecture is combined with the semester equivalent of two hours of supervised laboratory experience in a children's theatre setting.

Note: May not be taken for credit after completion of COMM 4283 or equivalent.

TH 5313: Theatre History I: Antiquity to Romanticism

A historical survey of the development of drama and theatre from classical Greece to the age of romanticism.

Note: May not be taken for credit after completion of TH 4313 or equivalent.

TH 5323: Theatre History II: Late 18th Century to the Present

The development of theatre from the late 1700s through the twenty-first century, including melodrama, realism, experimental theatre, feminism, political theatre, multiculturalism, and collective creation.

Note: May not be taken for credit after completion of TH 4323 or equivalent.

TH 5983: Theatre Seminar

Prerequisite: Twelve (12) hours in theatre or consent of instructor.

A directed seminar dealing with a selected topic in theatre studies.

Note: May be repeated for credit for different topics.

TH 6893: Independent Study

Open to graduate students who wish to pursue individual study or investigation of some facet of knowledge which complements the purpose of the University's graduate program. Students will be required to plan their studies and prepare formal written reports of their findings.

Note: The selected topic may not constitute any duplication of study leading to the accomplishment of a thesis.