Sixteenth Annual Student Research Symposium

 

Tuesday, March 17, 2015

Session 2

Pendergraft Library 300 South

Time        Presenter                 Mentor               Title of the Presentation                                  
9:00-9:15 Mostafa Hemmati  

Remarks

9:15-9:30 Di Wu and Weiyu Lu Zhi Chen

 INVESTIGATING OPTIMAL POWER FLOW WITH THE RENEWABLE ENERGY INTEGRATION

9:30-9:45 Jessica Oliver and Eva Samayoa  Ivan Still

IDENTIFICATION OF TACC GENE REARRANGEMENTS IN GASTRIC AND OVARIAN CANCER

9:45-10:00

Hanna Crane, Zach Crossett, Saul Pennington and Andrea Sims

T Yamashita

SCORPION SODIUM TOXIN GENE VARIABILITY AND TOXIN OVEREXPRESSION STUDIES

10:00-10:15

Justin J. Lewandowski and Lorn M. Freeze

 Dong-Soo Lee and Seungsuk Lee

Customers' Perception, Satisfaction, and Loyalty of Food Truck

10:15-10:30  Cassandra King and Sara Hoover  Malcom Rainey Jr. and Alvin Williams  EVALUATION OF THE EFFICACY OF LONG ACTING NON-STEROIDAL ANTI-INFLAMMATORIES AS PART OF THE CASTRATION PROTOCOL IN 10 DAY OLD PIGS
10:30-10:45    Break  
10:45-11:00  Connor Harris Franklin D. Hardcastle 

 BOND VALENCE – BOND LENGTH RELATIONSHIPS FOR CARBON-CARBON AND CARBON-OXYGEN BONDS

11:00-11:15 Jeb Stacy   Jessica Young

 LOW COST LASER BEAM PROFILER

11:15-11:30 Adrian L. Haley, Lauren N. Broadbent, Lindsey S. McDaniel, Skye T. Heckman and Carlee H. Hinkle    Charles Mebi

A Comparative Study of hydrogenase Models

11:30-11:45  Hunter Newberry  Sabino Piazzolla and Mostafa Hemmati

STATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF CLOUD COVER OVER OPTICAL COMMUNICATION GROUND STATIONS

11:45-12:00

Ryan Horn and Aaron Meredith

 Mostafa Hemmati

 MAXIMUM POSSIBLE CURRENTS FOR ANTI-FORCE BREAKDOWN WAVES

12:00-1:15   Lunch Break  
1:15-1:30 Frank Hellmer Loretta Cochran and Cathi McMahan

 The Business of Independence

1:30-1:45  Jade Carter    Bruce L. Tedford  

CAN GROWTH RATES IN RAINBOW TROUT (ONCORHYNCHUS MYKISS) BE INFLUENCED WITH TIMED DAILY DISTURBANCES?

1:45-2:00  Fy'Nisha Oliver  Jennifer A. Lewter and John R. Clark

PLAYING WITH PRIMERS: DNA FINGERPRINTING OF BLACKBERRY CULTIVARS

2:00-2:15 Miccah Bowen and Elizabeth T. Waters  Randy Renfro

THE ECONOMIC IMPORTANCE OF GENETICALLY MODIFIED ORGANISM PRODUCTION IN THE ARKANSAS RIVER VALLEY AND ATTITUDES TOWARD IT

2:15-2:30  Kimberly Fletcher  Scott Kirkconnell  THE EFFECTS OF BATHING IMMEDIATELY BEFORE SWIMMING ON THE NUMBERS OF FECAL CONTAMINATION INDICATOR ORGANISMS PRESENT IN SWIMMING WATER
2:30-2:45  Zach Crossett, Peng Feng and  Matthew Norman  Scott Kirkconnell  EFFECTS OF NORMAL ACTIVITY ON COGNITIVE FUNCTIONING
       

 

     

 

   

 

 

     

 

     
     

 

 

   

 

     

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sixteenth Annual Senior Honors Symposium
 
Tuesday, March 17, 2015
Session 1 - Pendergraft Library 300 North

 

Time Presenter Project Project Director
9:30-9:45 Kathryn Gatling Agricultural Commodities Pricing: Factors Influencing Price Changes Dr. Marc Fusaro, Associate Professor of Economics
9:50-10:05 Zane Jeffers Budgetary Problem in Governmental Agencies Dr. Pam Carr
Professor of Accounting
10:10-10:25 Marie Asher An Electromyographical Analysis of the Primary Muscles Utilized in Variations of the Push-Up

Dr. Brian Lyons, Associate Professor of Health/Physical Education

Dr. Jerry Mayo, Associate Professor of Health/Physical Education

Mr. Russell Hendrix, Visiting Assistant Professor of Health/Physical Education

10:30-10:45  Cassandra Sumler  Attitudes Toward Gender Roles in Romantic Relationships Based on the Media

 Dr. David Ward, Associate Professor of Psychology

10:50-11:05 Forest Davis IEEE Robotics Dr. Yung Kil Lee, Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering
11:10-11:25 Shelby Robinson Nursing Care of Pregnant Patients Experiencing Intimate Partner Violence Ms. Jennifer Coleman
Assistant Professor of Nursing
11:30-11:45 Lyndsey Hunt Rehabilitation Methods for Individuals with a Spinal Cord Injury Dr. Penny Willmering, Professor and Director of Rehabilitation Science
11:50-12:05 Katherine McCalman Running Head: Cross-Gender Friendship and Quality of Life of College Students Dr. David Ward, Associate Professor of Psychology
12:10-12:25 Taylor Freeman Targeting DNA-Protein Kinase for Cancer Therapy via NU7206 and Secondary Chemotherapeutic Reagents Dr. Ivan Still
Associate Professor of Biology
Biological Sciences
     

 

     

 

       

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Abstracts
 
2015 Student Research Symposium
Tuesday, March 17
 
Pendergraft Library, 300 (South)
 

 

 

9:15-9:30
 
INVESTIGATING OPTIMAL POWER FLOW WITH THE RENEWABLE ENERGY INTEGRATION
 
Di Wu, dwu2@atu.edu
Weiyu Lu, wlu@atu.edu
Zhi Chen, zchen3@atu.edu
Department of Electrical Engineering

 

Power flow calculation is usually used to ensure that electrical energy transfer from generation side to demand side through the power grid is stable, reliable and economiccal. Through the power flow calculations engineers can obtain the voltage magnitudes and phase angles at each bus in the steady state. This is significant issue as the magnitudes of the bus voltages are required to be held within a specified limit in order to avoid the shutdown of energy supply.
An investigation to evaluate the performance of power flow in electric power systems, including renewable generation will be presented. The proposed simulation will addresses the natures of power flow with renewable generation integration in electric power systems. Power World Simulation model will be introduced for the electric power system operation problem with renewable generation constraints.

 

 

 

 

9:30-9:45
 
IDENTIFICATION OF TACC GENE REARRANGEMENTS IN GASTRIC AND OVARIAN CANCER
 
Jessica Oliver (joliver9@atu.edu) & Eva Samayoa (esamayoa@atu.edu)
Ivan Still (istill@atu.edu)
Department of Biological Sciences

 

An estimated 14.1 million people are diagnosed with cancer worldwide every year and gastric and ovarian cancers are in the top five most diagnosed. Gastric cancer has a 5-year survival rate of 28%, while ovarian cancer has a 5-year survival rate of 40%. In several cases of gastric and ovarian cancers, the TACC (transforming acidic coiled coil) genes, particularly TACC1 and TACC3, are expressed abnormally. Studies on bladder cancer, lung cancer, and glioblastoma have shown a translocation occurring between the TACC genes and the FGFR genes (fibroblast growth factor receptor), specifically FGFR1 and FGFR3. This translocation produces a TACC-FGFR fusion gene, the resulting protein of which can be used as a target in new drug inhibiting treatments. Thus identification of TACC-FGFR rearrangements in tumors could be vital to effective cancer cell regression. However, studies to locate this rearrangement in gastric and ovarian cancers have not been carried out. For our research project, we plan to investigate whether or not the TACC-FGFR translocation is involved in the progression of gastric and ovarian cancers. To do this we will first validate a known TACC-FGFR translocation in the RT4 bladder cancer cell line using reverse-transcription (rt)-PCR analysis. Then we will use validated TACC-FGFR primers to perform an analysis on 20-30 gastric and ovarian tumor samples. Comparing the tumor results to the known RT4 line will allow us to determine if the TACC-FGFR translocation is present during gastric and ovarian tumor development. Identifying this rearrangement in gastric and ovarian cancers could lead to groundbreaking treatments that could potentially save millions of lives.

 

 

 

9:45-10:00
 
SCORPION SODIUM TOXIN GENE VARIABILITY AND TOXIN OVEREXPRESSION STUDIES
 
Hanna Crane, Zach Crossett, Saul Pennington, Andrea Sims
hcrane1@atu.edu, zcrossett@atu.edu, spennington5@atu.edu, asims9@atu.edu
T Yamashita, tyamashita@atu.edu
Department of Biological Sciences

 

The goal of this research was to conduct small-scale induction expression studies on the sodium -channel toxin protein from the venom of the scorpion Centruroides vittatus. Several toxin genes were previously isolated by an earlier research group, and sequence analysis from the isolated genes showed variation between two genes: Na667 and Na668 toxins. This particular experiment is centered on further analysis of Na667. After the toxin genes were transferred into appropriate cells, protein expression was chemically induced via isopropyl β-D-1-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG). Different strains of plasmid vectors and expression cells were used in an effort to determine which vector and cell combinations allowed optimal growth and induction of the toxin protein. Based on SDS-PAGE analysis, Rosetta 1019/Na 667 cells showed the greatest induction. We determined that the protein of interest weighs approximately 45 kDa, as shown on SDS-PAGE results. As scorpion toxins are of great medical importance for their impacts on human cell physiology, these experiments will be continued with larger scale induction expression studies and varying induction parameters.

 

 

 

10:00-10:15
 
Customers' Perception, Satisfaction, and Loyalty of Food Truck
 
Justin J. Lewandowski, Lorn M. Freeze
Dong-Soo Lee, and Seungsuk Lee; dlee13@atu.edu, slee17@atu.edu
Department of Parks and Recreation

 

Food truck business has become increasingly trendy in the US in recent years. According to IBIS World research firm in Los Angeles (An, 2014), the food truck sector business has grown an average of 8.4 percent from 2007 to 2012. In 2012, the food truck industry generated $650 million in revenue and is expected to be about 2.7 billion by 2017 (Krummert, 2013) in the US. In addition, social media such as Facebook, Twitter, Yelp, or Foursquare and mobile technology (e.g., smartphones) have been widely used as a marketing tool in food truck business. This study explores the customers' perception, satisfaction, and loyalty about gourmet food trucks.
Data were collected from a food truck users in Midwestern area and 161 respondents were participated in this survey. Results revealed that the majority of respondents were females (54%), young and educated generations, and had a food truck dining service before (77%). Almost half of respondents (47%) were willing to spend between $5.01 and $7.50 for their lunch at a food truck.
Respondents were highly satisfied with their dining experience (overall mean score for all items = 4.49) of the gourmet food truck, food truck food quality (4.37), food truck customers' loyalty (4.19), food truck service quality (4.01) while they were least satisfied with food truck employee hygiene practice (3.74).
As customers' perception of food trucks, the finding showed the important elements of food truck indicated that 'prompt and quick service' and 'understanding menu items of menu board' in service quality and 'food texture' and 'food favor' in food quality were most important selection elements when they choose gourmet food trucks.
 

 

 

 

10:15-10:30
 
EVALUATION OF THE EFFICACY OF LONG ACTING NON-STEROIDAL ANTI-INFLAMMATORIES AS PART OF THE CASTRATION PROTOCOL IN 10 DAY OLD PIGS
 
Cassandra King, cking22@atu.edu; Sara Hoover, shoover2@atu.edu
Malcom Rainey Jr., mraineyjr@atu.edu; Alvin Williams, awilliams37@atu.edu
Department of Agriculture

 

Based on industry standards and normal animal husbandry practices surgical castration is done when pigs average 10 days of age without any pain relieving dedication. With animal welfare becoming an ever increasing issue in animal production agriculture, suggestions have been made for the use of systemic pain relief to mitigate post-procedural pain. This research was designed to evaluate if the administration of a systemic pain relief medication given post- procedure would improve the pig's recovery process. In order to test this hypothesis intact male pigs from two farrowing groups were randomly assigned to one of two treatment groups. The treatment groups consisted of castrates receiving either 0.5mg/kg of body weight of Meloxicam post-procedure or equivalent dose of distilled water (control). At initiation of the test each pig's weight was taken and recorded and dosage calculated for each treatment. Weights were also taken and recorded on day 2, 4 and 7 post-treatment. Weight gain post-procedure is used as an indication of recovery time. Preliminary results suggest there was no significant improvement in weight gains between animals that received pain relief medication and the control group.

 

  

 

10:45-11:00
 
BOND VALENCE – BOND LENGTH RELATIONSHIPS FOR CARBON-CARBON AND CARBON-OXYGEN BONDS
 
Connor Harris (charris32@atu.edu)
Franklin D. Hardcastle (fhardcastle@atu.edu)
Department of Physical Sciences

 

The empirical logarithmic dependence of bond order (s, or valence) on bond length (R) was first developed by Pauling (1947),
14s=expRo-Rb' type="#_x0000_t75">
 
where Ro corresponds to a bond length of unit valence and b represents a fitting parameter. Since then, experimental values for the b parameter have been recorded anywhere within the range of 0.25 to 0.90. Many have accepted a universal b value of 0.37 while allowing Roto be the fitting parameter; however, it has been found that this value yields unreliable valences for longer and shorter bonds.
 
Addressing this issue, a theoretical expression for the b parameter was proposed recently, allowing its determination from the orbital exponents of the anion and cation participating in the bond. In this study, working bond valence – bond length relationships were determined for C-C and C-O bonds through the use of the previously-mentioned b expression, orbital exponent data from Clementi and Raimondi (1963), and a collection of X-ray diffraction data from various studies. The resulting relationship are proposed to work for any bonding environment.

 

 

 

11:00-11:15
 
LOW COST LASER BEAM PROFILER
 
Jeb Stacy, jstacy2@atu.edu
Jessica Young, jyoung35@atu.edu
Department of Physical Science

 

Laser beam profilers are an important tool for studying laser beams. A disadvantage of commercially available beam profilers is the cost which is typically around $3,500. This research was pursued to find a viable replacement using a low cost CCD from a security camera (available for ~$40). A program had to be developed and implemented. A benefit to this is that the profiler can be programed to take a variety of measurements. This low cost beam profiler is capable of measuring relative intensity, beam width, and beam quality of the laser.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

11:15-11:30
 
A Comparative Study of hydrogenase Models
 
Adrian L. Haley: rahaley@atu.edu;Lauren N. Broadbent: lbroadbent@atu.edu; Lindsey S. McDaniel: lmcdaniel7@atu.edu; Skye T. Heckman: sheckman@atu.edu; Carlee H. Hinkle: chinkle@atu.edu
Charles Mebi: cmebi@atu.edu
Department of Physical sciences

 

Two linkage isomers composing of diironhexacarbonyl clusters coupled to α and p-toluenethiolate ligands have been usefully prepared and structurally characterized. The crystal structure of [(α-toluenethiolate)2Fe2(CO)6] has been determined by X-ray crystallography. The influence of the α and p-toluenethiolate ligands on the electronic and electrochemical properties of the iron-carbonyl unit has been investigated using infrared spectroscopy, UV-visible spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry and the results will be presented. These compounds are mimics of the active site of the hydrogenase enzyme. They are therefore of interest as electrocatalysts for the reduction of proton to produce molecular hydrogen, a clean alternative to fossil fuels.

 

 

 

  
 
11:30-11:45
 
STATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF CLOUD COVER OVER OPTICAL COMMUNICATION GROUND STATIONS
 
Hunter Newberry, hnewberry@atu.edu
Sabino Piazzolla and Mostafa Hemmati, mhemmati@atu.edu
Department of Physical Science

 

The most common obstruction to Earth-space optical communication links is cloud cover. For this reason, the statistical characterization of clouds above potential optical communication ground station locations is greatly important. A weatherproof, infrared camera has been deployed to gather and process cloud coverage data. It provides accurate readings during the day and at night with constant sensitivity. It is also equipped with its own data processing software that calculates atmospheric emissions, and removes it from its images to correctly identify cloud signatures. Four years of cloud image data have been accumulated thus far and it is the duty of this project to analyze this data and build an archive of useful statistics. Monthly, weekly, and daily averages of cloud optical depth, the average length of observed clear or cloudy skies and seasonal trends in cloud coverage are just a few statistics that will be constructed. The ultimate goal is to find optical communication ground sites with statistically anti-correlated cloud cover so that optical communication from earth to space can be performed at any time.

 

 

 

 

 

11:45-12:00
 
MAXIMUM POSSIBLE CURRENTS FOR ANTI-FORCE BREAKDOWN WAVES
 
Ryan Horn, Aaron Meredith, rhorn1@atu.edu, ameredith1@atu.edu
Mostafa Hemmati, mhemmati@atu.edu
Department of Physical Science
Electrical breakdown of a gas in a strong electric field is carried out by a wave with a strong discontinuity at the wave front traveling with speeds comparable to speed of light. The propagation characteristics of breakdown waves propagating in the opposite direction of the electric field force on electrons and with a significant current behind the wave front have been studied. The successful model, a one-dimensional, steady-state, three-fluid hydro-dynamical representation has been utilized to find analytical solutions for current bearing breakdown waves propagating in the opposite direction of electric field force on electrons. The electron gas partial pressure is assumed to be the main element in driving the wave. The governing equations include the equations of conservation of mass, momentum, and energy, plus the Poisson's equation.
Waves propagating in the opposite direction of the electric field force on electrons, referred to as the anti-force waves, will possess different structure than those moving in the same direction as the direction of the electric field force on electrons. For waves with a significant current behind the shock front, the equation of conservation of energy and Poisson's equation, as well as the shock condition on electron temperature have to be modified. For a range of experimentally measured wave velocities, maximum currents for which solutions for our set of electron fluid dynamical equations become possible have been determined. Wave profile for electric field, electron velocity, electron number density and electron temperature will be presented.

 

 

 

 

1:15-1:30
 
The Business of Independence
 
Frank Hellmer, fhellmer@atu.edu
Loretta Cochran, lcochran@atu.edu
Cathi McMahan, cmcmahan@atu.edu
School of Business
Department of Parks, Recreation, and Hospitality Administration

 

This study examines the utility of services and supports provided to ATU students registered with the Disability Services office. This is an exploratory survey to examine the most effective supports for students with disabilities on a typical college campus. A "return on investment" model will be used to provide recommendations on how schools may prioritize supports.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
 
 
1:30-1:45
 
CAN GROWTH RATES IN RAINBOW TROUT (ONCORHYNCHUS MYKISS) BE INFLUENCED WITH TIMED DAILY DISTURBANCES?
 
Jade Carter   jcarter45@atu.edu
Bruce L. Tedford   btedford@atu.edu
Dept. of Fisheries and Wildlife
Dept. of Biological Sciences

 

While many studies have shown the negative influence of stressors upon growth in fish (see Jentoft, et al., 2005), some studies have achieved growth enhancement of body metabolism (fat production, reproduction/seasonality, and growth -- Meier et al. 1973). A short, daily disturbance (3 hours of bubbling), was applied 16 to 19 hours after light onset, in one concrete trout run, with the control run getting no bubbling disturbance. Fish growth was followed by selective sampling of trout in each run. Results and future research directions are discussed

 

 

 

 

 

 
 
 
 
1:45-2:00
 
PLAYING WITH PRIMERS: DNA FINGERPRINTING OF BLACKBERRY CULTIVARS
 
Fy'Nisha Oliver1 foliver@atu.edu, Jennifer A. Lewter1 jlewter@atu.edu, John R. Clark2 jrclark@uark.edu
1Biology Department, Arkansas Tech University
2Horticulture Department, University of Arkansas

 

Microsatellite DNA polymorphisms provide a wonderful opportunity for the exploitation and identification, or "fingerprinting", of many different varieties of cultivated blackberry. Reliable identification of university-bred blackberries is of great interest due to the easily-propagated nature of the valuable plants. In this study, we were able to use 20 microsatellite markers with basic PCR techniques and agarose gel electrophoresis to identify more than 30 unique cultivars of patented or pre-patented blackberry plants bred at the University of Arkansas. This project emphasizes the low-cost and efficiency of being able to use an in-house protocol to identify specific plants. We have demonstrated that a single blackberry cultivar can be positively identified for less than ten dollars within a twelve-hour period.

 

 

 

 

 

2:00-2:15
 
THE ECONOMIC IMPORTANCE OF GENETICALLY MODIFIED ORGANISM PRODUCTION IN THE ARKANSAS RIVER VALLEY AND ATTITUDES TOWARD IT
 
Miccah Bowen, Mbowen8@atu.edu
Elizabeth T. Waters, Ewaters1@atu.edu
Randy Renfro , rrenfro@atu.edu
Department of Agriculture

 

The use of genetically modified crops has become increasingly widespread as an ingredient in cosmetics and foodstuffs in the United States. This project is an attempt to determine the amount of genetically modified soybeans currently being grown locally as well as statewide. One of the project's objectives is to measure how knowledgeable faculty, students, and staff were concerning this widespread use. Students worked with Cooperative Extension Service Agents and personnel of the Natural Resources Conservation Service to collect soybean production data in Conway, Yell, and Pope Counties. A survey was created and delivered via e-mail to Arkansas Tech University faculty, students, and staff containing general questions designed to discover attitudes and opinions of GMO usage.

 

 

  

 

2:15-2:30
 
THE EFFECTS OF BATHING IMMEDIATELY BEFORE SWIMMING ON THE NUMBERS OF FECAL CONTAMINATION INDICATOR ORGANISMS PRESENT IN SWIMMING WATER
 
Kimberly Fletcher (kfletcher@atu.edu)
Scott Kirkconnell (skirkconnell@atu.edu)
Biology Department

 

The purpose of this study is to quantify the effects of showering immediately prior to swimming on numbers of fecal contamination indicator organisms present in the swimming water. Researchers hypothesize that showering before entering swimming water will reduce the numbers of indicator organisms released by a swimmer. This study is performed by using minimal amounts of water in a controlled setting. Various treatments are applied to each water sample and subjects sit in the water wearing a typical bathing suit after either showering or not showering. Indicator organism densities were determined using the most probable number fermentation technique.

 

 

 

 

2:30-2:45
 
EFFECTS OF NORMAL ACTIVITY ON COGNITIVE FUNCTIONING
 
Zach Crossett (zcrossett@atu.edu), Peng Feng (pfeng@atu.edu), Matthew Norman (mnorman@atu.edu)
Scott Kirkconnell (skirkconnell@atu.edu)
Biology Department

 

Cognition studies often focus on elderly subjects, yet younger adults, including college students, could be profitably evaluated. We investigated the relationship between college students' cognitive performances and their daily activities in order to identify factors that enhance cognition. Increased cognitive functioning benefits all members of society and will enhance both academic and workforce productivity. Cognitive functioning was measured using the "Stroop's Race Test", which measures reaction times and the "SpeedColor" test which quantifies higher level cognitive functioning.   These two tests are easily accessible on both Apple and Android smart phones. Stress levels were also monitored using smartphones and times of day noted to determine whether those factors influenced performances. These noninvasive, nonintrusive protocols made research possible without provoking concern by oversight committees such as institutional research boards. These preliminary data indicate that the chronotype of the individual rather than nature of the activity more profoundly influence test performances.
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