Curriculum

Course Descriptions

 

Pre-Law

Pre-Law Accredited law schools have not, in general, adopted specific requirements for pre-law courses. In most cases, courses of value to those planning to study law include: history, economics, political science, philosophy, psychology, sociology, English composition, and literature, as well as courses in the natural sciences, mathematics, and accounting. A broad cultural background is of prime importance.

The American Bar Association offers the following guidance for pre-law majors: "There are important skills and values, and significant bodies of knowledge that you can acquire prior to law school and that will provide a sound foundation for a legal education. These include analytic and problem-solving skills, critical reading abilities, writing skills, oral communication and listening abilities, general research skills, task organization and management skills, and the values of serving faithfully the interests of others while also promoting justice. If you wish to prepare adequately for a legal education, and for a career in law or for other professional service that involves the use of lawyering skills, you should seek educational, extra-curricular and life experiences that will assist you in developing those attributes." (Preparing for Law School ). Rather than attempt to prescribe the specific contents of courses to be taken by pre-law students, Arkansas Tech University considers the individual intellectual interests of students most important, encouraging development of the ability to read and comprehend accurately, rapidly, and thoroughly; to think logically; to analyze and weigh situations and materials; to speak and write clearly; and to develop a critical approach and mature study habits.

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