Undergraduate Catalog
Colleges

Department of Behavioral Sciences

Dr. Jeffrey Woods, Head
Witherspoon Hall, Room 240
(479) 968-0274
jwoods@atu.edu

Professor:
Bowen, Harris, Martin, Willmering
Associate Professors:
Huss,Osburn, Schluterman, Ulsperger, Varner, Ward, Warnick, Wilkerson
Assistant Professors:
Everett, Lockyer, McHugh, Samson, Stobaugh, Wiewel
Instructor
Willbanks

The Behavioral Sciences Department includes the allied disciplines of psychology, sociology, anthropology, criminal justice, and rehabilitation science, including minors in each area, an Associate of Science in criminal justice and in Ozark-Ouachita Studies. The student is offered the opportunity to develop an understanding of human behavior via the distinctive approach of each discipline as well as an integrated view of interpersonal, social, and cultural activities.

The department has several distinctive goals. It gives basic preparation which may lead to advanced study; it provides a career line for work in state and local agencies and programs; it provides practical experience and skills in human services; and it offers electives to support other programs of study in the University.

The student may select a major in psychology, sociology, rehabilitation science, or criminal justice. In addition, the student may select an Associate of Science in criminal justice or a minor in anthropology, psychology, sociology, rehabilitation science, or criminal justice.

While each area outlines a complete program below, one of the objectives of the department is to maintain maximum flexibility of planning with each student within the context of the broad range of offerings. Each student is encouraged to consult with a departmental advisor at the earliest opportunity to develop a program appropriate to his/her interests and goals.

Psychology

The Psychology curriculum is designed to (1) prepare students for advanced study in psychology; (2) support, through electives, programs of study in other disciplines; (3) give a basis for entry into the job market; (4) arouse the curiosity of all students regarding human behavior; (5) provide opportunities for experiences outside the classroom by way of field programs and practical experiences.

The student majoring in psychology must, in addition to meeting the general education requirements:

Basic Core (12 hours):

  1. PSY 2003 General Psychology
  2. PSY 2053 Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences
  3. PSY 2063 Research Methods for the Behavioral Sciences
  4. PSY 4003 Advanced Research Methods for Psychology

Topical Core (12 hours must be chosen from these classes):

  1. PSY 3003 Abnormal Psychology
  2. PSY 3053 Physiological Psychology
  3. PSY 3063 Developmental Psychology I
  4. PSY 3073 Psychology of Learning
  5. PSY 4043 Social Psychology
  6. PSY 4073 Cognitive Psychology

Other:

  1. Upper Division Elective, PSY 6 hours
  2. ANTH 2003 Cultural Anthropologyor ANTH 1213 Introduction to Anthropologyand SOC 1003 Introductory Sociology
  3. MATH 1113 College Algebra or higher
  4. Minor or Second Major

Curriculum in Psychology

The matrix below is a sample plan for all coursework required for this program
Freshman
Fall Spring
ENGL 1013 Composition I1,T 3 ENGL 1023 Composition II1,T 3
U.S. History/Government1,T 3 Science with Lab1,T 4
Mathematics1,T 3 PSY 2003 General PsychologyT 3
TECH 1001 Orientation to the University 1 Elective3,T 6
Elective3,T 6
Total Hours 16 Total Hours 16
 
Sophomore
Fall Spring
Fine Arts & Humanities1,T 6 Second Field of Study2,T 3
Science with Lab1,T 4 PSY Topical Core4 3
PSY 2053 Statistics for the Behavioral SciencesT 3 PSY 2063 Research Design for the Behavioral SciencesT 3
Elective3,T 6
Total Hours 13 Total Hours 15
 
Junior
Fall Spring
SOC 1003 Introductory SociologyT 3 ANTH 1213 Introduction to Anthropology or ANTH 2003 Cultural AnthropologyT 3
Second Field of Study2 3 Second Field of Study2 6
PSY Topical Core4 6 PSY Topical Core 4 3
Elective3 3 Elective3 3
Total Hours 15 Total Hours 15
 
Senior
Fall Spring
PSY (3000-4000 level) 6 PSY 4003 3
Second Field of Study2 3 Elective3 12
Elective3 6
Total Hours 15 Total Hours 15
 
1See appropriate alternatives or substitutions in "General Education Requirements".
2A minor or Second major may be used to fulfill the 2nd field of study.
3At least 40 of the total hours required for graduation must be 3000 - 4000 level courses.
4See appropriate options in "Topical Core".
TDesignates a block of courses that would provide for a seamless transfer into this program if equivalent courses are taken at another college or university.


Minor Psychology

The psychology minor is designed for students of any major who want to pursue an understanding of human behavior through psychology. Many majors could benefit from the psychology minor, but majors that are especially compatible include biology, business education, nursing, pre-med, pre-law, rehabilitation science, and sociology. The minor in psychology requires 18 hours of courses:

PSY 2003 General Psychology
PSY Electives (3 hours)
PSY Electives (12 hours of 3000 or 4000 level)

Rehabilitation Science

Dr. Penny Willmering, Director
Witherspoon 336-D
(479) 968-0461
pwillmering@atu.edu

The Rehabilitation Science curriculum is designed to produce undergraduate rehabilitation generalists who have training and experience conducive to successful careers in various rehabilitation service programs. Within the Rehabilitation Science major six emphasis areas are offered: 1) Addictions, 2) Aging, 3) Child Welfare, 4) Corrections, 5) Social Services, and 6) Disabilities/Vocational Rehabilitation.

The Rehabilitation Science Program is dedicated to nurturing the scholastic development, respect for diversity, ethical behavior, passion for advocacy, and professionalism of future rehabilitation practitioners.  The graduates from the program will effectively serve the needs of the community, individuals with disabilities, and other human service populations.  In order to accomplish this mission, the program has a primary objective to develop personnel for careers with state and private agencies that provide rehabilitation services to persons with disabilities.  The program prepares scholars to enter the workforce immediately upon graduation or to pursue additional educational training in graduate school.

Upon graduation from the program students may work in a variety of roles such as case worker, case manager, parole officer, probation officer, juvenile intake officer, children and family service worker, addictions professional, or a number of rehabilitation service provider roles in direct service settings. Examples of these settings are state rehabilitation services, developmental disability centers, psychiatric treatment facilities, correctional settings, nursing homes, halfway houses, community based rehabilitation facilities, workforce centers, disability determination units, and occupational training schools.

Graduates from the program who elect to attend graduate school typically pursue degrees in rehabilitation counseling, other counseling specialties, psychology related fields, social work, occupational therapy, physical therapy, and other human service related fields of study.

The student majoring in rehabilitation science must, in addition to completing the general education requirements:

Curriculum in Rehabilitation Science

The matrix below is a sample plan for all coursework required for this program
Freshman
Fall Spring
ENGL 1013 Composition I1,T 3 ENGL 1023 Composition II1,T 3
Mathematics1,T 3 Science with Lab1,T 4
SOC 1003 Introductory SociologyT 3 ANTH 1213 Introduction to Anthropologyor ANTH 2003 Cultural Anthropology 3
TECH 1001 Orientation to the University 1 PSY 2003 General PsychologyT 3
RS 2003 Introduction to Rehabilitation Services 3 ElectiveT 2
ElectiveT 2
Total Hours 15 Total Hours 15
 
Sophomore
Fall Spring
Science with Lab1,T 4 PSY 2063 Research Design for the Behavioral Sciences or SOC 2063 Research Design for the Behavioral Sciences 3
PSY 2053 Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences or SOC 2053 Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences T 3 RS 3004 4
PSY 3063T 3 Elective or Emphasis Area2,T 8
RS 3013 3
ElectiveT 2
Total Hours 15 Total Hours 15
 
Junior
Fall Spring
Fine Arts & Humanities1,T 3 Fine Arts & Humanities1,T 3
RS 3023 3 PSY 3003T 3
RS 3073 3 RS 3123 3
Elective or Emphasis Area2 6 RS 40_43 4
Elective or Emphasis Area2 2
Total Hours 15 Total Hours 15
       
 
Senior
Fall Spring
RS 3133 3 U.S. History/Government1,T 3
RS 40_43 4 RS 40_43 4
Elective or Emphasis Area2 8 Elective or Emphasis Area2 8
Total Hours 15 Total Hours 15
 
1See appropriate alternatives or substitutions in "General Education Requirements".
218 hours of emphasis area courses are required. 12 hours in a primary emphasis and 6 hours in a secondary emphasis.
3Students who choose to complete a 12 hour internship (RS 4012) will do so either their last or next to last semester and will not take the three field placements RS 40_4.
TDesignates a block of courses that would provide for a seamless transfer into this program if equivalent courses are taken at another college or university.


Minor Rehabilitation Science

The rehabilitation science minor is designed primarily for psychology and sociology majors who want to add an applied dimension to their degree and are interested in working in a human services setting after completing degree requirements. It may also be of interest to business majors interested in working in human resources, nursing majors, education majors, and other degree programs. The minor in rehabilitation science requires 18 hours of courses:

RS 2003 Introduction to Rehabilitation Services
RS 3023 Principles and Techniques of Rehabilitation Science
*RS Electives (12 hours)

*Students who choose to complete a minor in rehabilitation science should consult with a rehabilitation science faculty member to discuss course selection and how they want their RS minor to supplement their major.

Sociology

The Sociology curriculum is designed to prepare students for employment in a range of careers or for advanced study in sociology, law, criminology, criminal justice, counseling, education, research, population, social work or other related fields. Sociology prepares majors to deal with the constant social change that is today’s world. In addition to understanding the organization of social groups and the human behaviors that comprise everyday social life, sociologists remain important contributors to the collection of data pertaining to these levels of human behavior. The undergraduate sociology major learns to identify problems, formulate appropriate questions, search for answers, analyze data, organize information, and express themselves in written and spoken communication. The undergraduate major provides a strong liberal arts degree for entry-level positions throughout the business, social service, and government worlds. In addition to the general education requirements, a student majoring in sociology must complete: (1) 30 hours of sociology including SOC 1003 Introductory Sociology, SOC 2053 Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences, SOC 2063 Research Design for the Behavioral Sciences, SOC 2073 History of Social Thought , SOC 2083 Sociological Thought, SOC 3163 Introduction to Social Research, SOC 4283 Sociology Capstone and 9 credit hours of 3000-4000 level Sociology courses; (2) Complete a minor or major in a second field of study; (3) PSY 2003 General Psychology; and (4) RS 2003 Introduction to Rehabilitation Services; and ANTH 1213 Introduction to Anthropologyor ANTH 2003 Cultural Anthropology.

Curriculum in Sociology

The matrix below is a sample plan for all coursework required for this program
Freshman
Fall Spring
ENGL 1013 Composition I1,T 3 ENGL 1023 Composition II1,T 3
Science with Lab1,T 4 Fine Arts & Humanities1,T 3
TECH 1001 Orientation to the University 1 ANTH 1213 Introduction to Anthropologyor ANTH 2003 Cultural AnthropologyT 3
SOC 1003 Introductory SociologyT 3 Mathematics1,T 3
General Elective2 3 General Elective2 3
Total Hours 14 Total Hours 15
 
Sophomore
Fall Spring
PSY 2003 General PsychologyT 3 U.S. History/Government1,T 3
Science with Lab1,T 4 Fine Arts & Humanities1,T 3
SOC 2053 Statistics for the Behavioral SciencesT 3 SOC 2083 Sociological ThoughtT 3
SOC 2063 Research Design for the Behavioral SciencesT 3 General Elective2 6
SOC 2073 History of Social Thought T 3
Total Hours 16 Total Hours 15
 
Junior
Fall Spring
RS 2003 Introduction to Rehabilitation ServicesT 3 SOC 3163 Introduction to Social Research 3
SOC Elective (3000-4000 level) 3 SOC Elective (3000-4000 level) 3
Elective- Minor 6 Elective- Minor 3
General Elective2 3 General Elective2 6
Total Hours 15 Total Hours 15
 
Senior
Fall Spring
SOC Elective (3000-4000 level) 3 SOC 4283 Sociology Capstone 3
Elective- Minor 6 Elective- Minor 3
General Elective2 6 General Elective2 9
Total Hours 15 Total Hours 15
 
1See appropriate alternatives or substitutions in "General Education Requirements".
2To be chosen in consultation with advisor. Students are strongly encouraged to pursue a foreign language. At least 40 of the total hours required for graduation must be 3000 - 4000 level courses.
TDesignates a block of courses that would provide for a seamless transfer into this program if equivalent courses are taken at another college or university.


Minor Sociology

The sociology minor is designed to prepare students for employment in a range of careers that require an understanding of social processes and institutions. In addition, the sociology minor is provided for students whose major department requires a minor. The minor in sociology requires 18 hours of courses:

SOC 1003 Introductory Sociology
SOC 3133/PSY 3133 Self and Society or SOC 2033/CJ 2033 Social Problems
SOC Electives (12 hours)

Associate of Science Criminal Justice

The Associate of Science degree program in criminal justice is designed primarily for students interested in police work at levels other than Federal. This degree will provide the basic, foundational, knowledge to supplement the police academy experience.

Completion of the requirement for the associate’s degree will provide the necessary background for those continuing study towards a bachelor’s degree. To qualify for the Associate of Arts in criminal justice, the student must satisfy the associate degree requirements, see "General Education Requirements" of this catalog and complete the following curriculum:

Curriculum in Criminal Justice

The matrix below is a sample plan for all coursework required for this program
Freshman
Fall   Spring  
ENGL 1013 Composition I1 3 ENGL 1023 Composition II1 3
Science with Lab1 4 Science with Lab1 4
Mathematics1,T 3 Fine Arts & Humanities1 3
TECH 1001 Orientation to the University 1 Social Sciences/Fine Arts/Humanities/Speech1 3
CJ 2003/SOC 2003 Introduction to Criminal Justice 3 CJ 2043/SOC 2043 Crime and Delinquency 3
Total 14 Total 16
 
Sophomore
Fall   Spring  
U.S. History/Government1 3 Social Sciences1 6
Fine Arts & Humanities1 3 General Elective 6
CJ 2033/SOC 2033 Social Problems 3 CJ Elective 3
CJ Elective 6
Total 15 Total 15
 
1See "General Education Requirements".

 

Minor Criminal Justice

The criminal justice minor is designed to prepare students for a career in the field of criminal justice, e.g. police work, probation/parole or corrections. In addition, the criminal justice minor is provided for students whose major department requires a minor. The minor in criminal justice requires 18 hours of courses:

CJ 2003/SOC 2003 Introduction to Criminal Justice
CJ 2043/SOC 2043 Crime and Delinquency
CJ Electives (12 hours)

MOU Between ATU and NSU

Arkansas Tech University (ATU) and Northwestern State University (NSU) have agreed to enter into a Memorandum of Understanding for a 2+2 program between the two institutions. The 2+2 program will allow students to complete the Associate of Arts in Criminal Justice at ATU and transfer in to the Bachelor of Art Degree in Criminal Justice at NSU. More information may be obtained from the Department of Behavioral Sciences.

Associate of Science Ozark-Ouachita Studies

This program is designed to enhance the educational experience of students wishing to remain in the state after graduation and was derived from student interest (across academic disciplines) in a variety of topics related to the Ozark-Ouachita region.  This new Associate of Science program offers the opportunity for students from three separate colleges pursuing a diversity of majors to focus their academic energy on issues of importance to Arkansas and its citizens.  One goal of the program is to foster academic collaboration between the University’s colleges with the hope of developing long-term research projects that combine the theories and methodologies of both the natural and social sciences.  Another goal of the program is to make students uniquely employable to Arkansas businesses and to federal and state agencies targeted at cultural preservation, natural resource protection, and social services.

To qualify for the Associate of Science in Ozark-Ouachita studies, the student must satisfy the associate degree requirements of this catalog and complete the following curriculum:

Curriculum in Ozark-Ouachita Studies

The matrix below is a sample plan for all coursework required for this program
Freshman
Fall   Spring  
ENGL 1013 Composition I1 3 ENGL 1023 Composition II1 3
Science with Lab1 4 Science with Lab1 4
Mathematics1 3 Fine Arts & Humanities1 3
TECH 1001 Orientation to the University 1 Social Sciences1 3
ANTH 1213 Introduction to Anthropologyor ANTH 2003 Cultural Anthropology 3 ANTH 2103 Ozark-Ouachita Studies 3
Total 14 Total 16
 
Sophomore
Fall   Spring  
Fine Arts & Humanities1 3 Social Sciences1 6
U.S. History/Government1 3 Approved Electives2 9
HIST 2153 Introduction to Arkansas History or HIST 4153 History of Arkansas 3    
SOC 2023 Sociology of the Ozark-Ouachita Region 3    
General Elective 3    
Total 15 Total 15
 
1See "General Education Requirements ".
2Apporved list of electives include: ANTH 3103 Anthopology of Food, ANTH 3303 Southeastern Archaeology, ANTH 3313 Southeastern Indians, BIOL 1004 Principles of Environmental Science, ENGL 4213 American Folklore, FW 2003 Elements of Fish and Wildlife Management, GEOL 1014 Physical Geology, GEOL 2024 Historical Geology, MUSM 4403/ANTH 4403/HIST 4403 Interpretation/Education through Museum Methods, RP 1002 Backpacking, RP 1011 Sport Hunting, RP 1013 Principles of Recreation and Park Administration, SOC 3063 Communities, SOC 4183 Social Gerontology.

 

Minor Anthropology

The minor in anthropology concentrates on the areas of cultural anthropology. Within this subdivision, the emphasis concerns historic and contemporary cultures (ethnography) and prehistoric cultures (archeology). The Russellville Station of the Arkansas Archeological Survey is located on the Arkansas Tech University campus and offers traditional opportunities in the state for students interested in anthropology. The minor in anthropology requires 18 hours of courses:

ANTH 2003 Cultural Anthropology
ANTH Electives (12 hours)