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Arkansas Tech University         2002-2003 Undergraduate Course Catalog

Department of Behavioral Sciences

Dr. W. Daniel Martin, Head
Witherspoon Hall, Room 347
(479) 9680305
Daniel. Martin@mail.atu.edu

Professors: Harris, Shry
Associate Professors: McLellan, StewartAbernathy, Titus
Assistant Professors: Earnest, Gadberry, Martin, Osburn, Ward,
Wilkerson, Willmering

The Behavioral Sciences Department includes the allied disciplines of psychology, sociology, anthropology, criminal justice, and rehabilitation science. The student is offered the opportunity to develop an understanding of human behavior via the distinctive approach of each discipline as well as an integrated view of interpersonal, social, and cultural activities.

The department has several distinctive goals. It gives basic preparation which may lead to advanced study, it provides a career line for work in state and local agencies and programs, it provides practical experience and skills in human services, and it offers electives to support other programs of study in the University.

The student may select a major or minor in psychology, sociology, and rehabilitation science, or minor in anthropology or criminal justice.

While each area outlines a complete program below, one of the objectives of the department is to maintain maximum flexibility of planning with each student within the context of the broad range of offerings. Each student is encouraged to consult with a departmental advisor at the earliest opportunity to develop a program appropriate to his/her interests and goals.

Psychology

The psychology curriculum is designed to (1) prepare students for advanced study in psychology; (2) support, through electives, programs of study in other disciplines; (3) give a basis for entry into the job market; (4) arouse the curiosity of all students regarding human behavior; (5) provide opportunities for experiences outside the classroom by way of field programs and practical experiences.

The student majoring in psychology must, in addition to meeting the general education requirements:

a. Complete a minimum of 31 credits in psychology to include: (18 credits must be upper division).
PSY 2003. General Psychology
PSY 2053. Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences
PSY 2074. Experimental Psychology

The remainder of the major may be developed to reflect various career goals.

If the student plans to go to graduate school, the following should be included: PSY 3053, PSY 3073, PSY 3153, PSY 4013, PSY 4033, PSY 4043.

If the student plans to seek employment in applied human service settings, the following should be included: PSY 2033, PSY 3003, PSY/SOC 3013, PSY 3063, PSY 3153.

If the student plans to seek employment in business, industry or organizational settings, the following should be included: PSY 2023, PSY 3093, PSY 4033, PSY 4043, PSY 42343.

b. Complete a minor of 15 credits in a second field of study designed to complement career objectives.

c. Complete Sociology 1003 and Anthropology 1213 or 2003.
Curriculum in Psychology

Freshman Year

Hours

English Composition I, II (ENGL 1013, 1023)1

6

Physical Science1

4

General Psychology (PSY 2003)

3

Social Sciences (HIST 2003 or 2013)

3

Physical Activity1

2

Algebra for General Education (MATH 1103)1

3

Introductory Sociology (SOC 1003)

3

Electives

8

Total

32

Sophomore Year

Principles of Zoology (BIOL 1124) or Human Anatomy (BIOL 2014)5

4

Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences (PSY 2053)

3

Minor

3

Fine Arts1

3

Experimental Psychology (PSY 2074)

4

Psychology Electives

3

Electives2

12

Total

32

Junior Year

Humanities1

3

Anthropology (ANTH 1213 or 2003)

3

Psychology (30004000 level)

9

Minor

6

Electives4

9

Total

30

Senior Year

Psychology (30004000 level)

9

Minor

3

Electives4

18

Total

30

1See appropriate alternatives or substitutions in "General Education Requirements" on page82.

2Those planning graduate work are urged to consider a foreign language.

3PSY 4234 requires professional/student liability insurance.

4At least 40 of the total hours required for graduation must be 3000 - 4000 level courses.

5If a student has already completed BIOL 1014, they may substitute BIOL 2004 for BIOL 1124 or BIOL 2014 as a Psychology requirement.

Rehabilitation Science

Dr. Lyman Harris, Director
Witherspoon 347
(479) 968-0306
Lyman.Harris@mail.atu.edu

The Rehabilitation Science curriculum is designed to produce undergraduate rehabilitation generalists who have training and experience conducive to successful careers in various rehabilitation service programs. There are five groups of students to whom the rehabilitation science curriculum will appeal: (1) those who wish to prepare for rehabilitation counseling, (2) those who wish to prepare for vocational evaluator and employment counselor careers, (3) those who wish to prepare for social caseworker careers, (4) those who desire to build a strong foundation for more intensive specialization at the graduate level in any of the rehabilitation services careers, and (5) those who are majoring in related disciplines such as psychology, sociology, education, nursing, and recreation who are concerned about the "human dimensions" of the populations to which they relate.

The primary objective of the program is to develop personnel for careers with state and private agencies providing rehabilitation services to individuals with a disability. Until such time as the student enters graduate school, he/she may work in a variety of roles such as caseworker, evaluator, parole officer, probation officer, juvenile intake officer, children and family service worker, or a number of rehabilitation serviceprovider roles in direct service agencies or institutions. Examples of these agencies and institutions are state rehabilitation services, departments of social services, mental retardation centers, mental hospitals, correctional facilities, nursing homes, halfway houses, sheltered workshops, employment security divisions, disability determination, and occupational skills training schools.

The student majoring in rehabilitation science must, in addition to completing the general education requirements:

a. Complete the rehabilitation and related required core, including 12 hours of field placement or a 12hour internship in rehabilitation science.3 If the field placements are taken instead of an internship, the student must take one placement course in the core rehabilitation area, one in the chosen primary emphasis area, and one in the chosen secondary emphasis area.1

b. Complete a minimum of 12 nonfield placement hours in a primary emphasis area and 6 hours of the indicated courses in a secondary emphasis area. Emphasis areas available are vocational rehabilitation, social services, aging, corrections, and child welfare.
Curriculum in Rehabilitation Science

Freshman Year

Hours

English Composition I, II (ENGL 1013, 1023)2

6

Physical Science 2

4

General Psychology (PSY 2003)

3

Introduction to Sociology (SOC 1003)

3

Introduction to Rehabilitation Services (RS 2003)

3

Physical Activity2

2

Algebra for General Education (MATH 1103)2

3

Electives

8

Total

32

Sophomore Year

Any General Education Biology Course is acceptable, except BIOL 11342

4

Developmental Psychology I (PSY 3063)

3

Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences (PSY 2053)

3

Research & Data Methods for Rehabilitation Science (RS 2093) (Spring)

3

Medical & Psychosocial Aspects of Disability (RS 3004) (Spring)

4

The World of Work (RS 3013)

3

Anthropology (ANTH 1213 or 2003)

3

Elective

2-6

Special Emphasis Area (Primary or Secondary)

3

Total

32

Junior Year

Principles & Techniques of Rehabilitation Services (RS 3023)

3

Abnormal Psychology (PSY 3003)

3

Fine Arts2

3

Humanities2

3

Organization and Structure in the Rehabilitation - Human Services Setting (RS 3073) (Fall)

3

Field Placement and/or Special Emphasis Area (Primary or Secondary)3

910

Electives4

56

Total

30

Senior Year

Social Sciences (HIST 2003 or 2013)

3

Field Placements or Internship3

812

Special Emphasis Area (Primary or Secondary)

610

Electives4

9

Total

30

1Students are encouraged to become involved in community volunteer service programs to broaden their knowledge of community services and to assist in placement choices prior to enrolling for a field placement. A catalog, listing possible placement sites available to students, will be in the director's office to assist students in placement choices. Prior to making placement choices, the student will have a conference with the placement director to discuss possible placement sites.

2See appropriate alternatives or substitutions in "General Education Requirements" on page82.

3Internships and field placements require professional/student liability insurance.

4At least 40 of the total hours required for graduation must be 3000 - 4000 level courses.

Sociology

The sociology curriculum is designed to prepare students for employment in a range of careers or for advanced study in sociology, law, criminology, criminal justice, counseling, education, research, population, social work or other related fields. Sociology prepares majors to deal with the constant social change that is today's world. In addition to understanding the organization of social groups and the human behaviors that comprise everyday social life, sociologists remain important contributors to the collection of data pertaining to these levels of human behavior. The undergraduate sociology major learns to identify problems, formulate appropriate questions, search for answers, analyze data, organize information, and express themselves in written and spoken communication. The undergraduate major provides a strong liberal arts degree for entry-level positions throughout the business, social service, and government worlds. In addition to the general education requirements, a student majoring in sociology must complete:

1. 30 hours of sociology including SOC 1003, 2073, 2083, 3163, 2053
(At least 18 credits must be upper division).

2. 15 hours in a second field of study.

3. PSY 2003.

4. RS 2003.

5. ANTH 1213 or ANTH 2003

6. COMS 1003
Curriculum in Sociology

Freshman Year

Hours

English Composition I, II (ENGL 1013, 1023)1

6

Social Sciences1

6

Science1

4

Algebra for General Education (MATH 1103)1

3

Physical Activity1

1

Introductory Sociology (SOC 1003)

3

Introduction to Computer Based Systems (COMS 1003)5

3

Sociology Elective4

3

Fine Arts/Humanities1

3

Total

32

Sophomore Year

Social Sciences1

6

Science1

4

General Psychology (PSY 2003)

3

Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences (SOC 2053)

3

History of Social Thought (SOC 2073)

3

Survey of Social Theory (SOC 2083)

3

Sociology Elective4

3

Fine Arts/Humanities1

3

Physical Activity1

1

Elective or related course2,3

3

Total

32

Junior Year

Introduction to Social Research (SOC 3163)

3

Sociology Electives4

6

Anthropology (ANTH 1213 or 2003)

3

Introduction to Rehabilitation Services (RS 2003)

3

Second Area of Study2

6

Electives or related courses2, 3

9

Total

30

Senior Year

Sociology Elective4

3

Second Area of Study2

9

Electives or related courses2, 3

18

Total

30

1See appropriate alternatives or substitutions in "General Education Requirements" on page82.

2To be chosen in consultation with advisor. Students are strongly encouraged to pursue a foreign language.

3Sufficient courses at 3000/4000 level to constitute 40 hours.

4At least 15 hours of sociology electives should be at 3000/4000 level.

5Arrange comparable course with permission of instructor.

Anthropology

The anthropology curriculum concentrates on the areas of cultural anthropology. Within this subdivision, the emphasis concerns historic and contemporary cultures (ethnography) and prehistoric cultures (archeology).

The Russellville Station of the Arkansas Archeological Survey is located on the Arkansas Tech University campus and offers traditional opportunities in the state for students interested in archeology.

The following courses are offered as electives or to students who wish to minor in anthropology:

ANTH 1213 Introduction to Anthropology
ANTH 2003 Cultural Anthropology
ANTH 3203 Indians of North America
ANTH 3223 North American Archeology
ANTH 3233 MesoAmerican Archeology
ANTH 32414 Seminar in Anthropology
ANTH 4206 Workshop in Anthropology
ANTH 4403 Interpretation/Education through Museum Methods
ANTH 49914 Special Problems in Anthropology

Criminal Justice

Dr. James Gadberry,
Coordinator
Witherspoon 345
(479) 964-0804
James.Gadberry@mail.atu.edu

The criminal justice curriculum is designed to (1) prepare students for a career in the field of criminal justice, e.g., police work, probation/parole, federal law enforcement, and (2) provide a minor for students whose major department requires one.

The following courses are offered as electives to students who wish to minor in criminal justice:

CJ 2003 Introduction to Criminal Justice
CJ 2013 Introduction to Security
CJ 3023 Judicial Process
CJ 3033 The Criminal Mind
CJ 3043 Crime and Delinquency
CJ 3063 Probation and Parole
CJ 3103 The Juvenile Justice System
CJ 3153 Prison and Corrections
CJ 3206 Law in Action
CJ 4023 Law and the Legal System
CJ 4053 Criminal Law and the Constitution
CJ 4063 American Constitutional Law 1941-Present: Civil Liberties and Civil Rights
CJ 49914 Special Problems in Criminal Justice



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