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Arkansas Tech University         2002-2003 Undergraduate Course Catalog

Course Descriptions

In this section of the catalog, all courses taught at Arkansas Tech University are listed alphabetically by subject area. Courses fulfilling subject matter requirements in more than one area are cross-listed; e.g., the listing POLS(HIST)4043 is offered for three semester hours of credit in either political science or history. For departmental write-ups and detailed curricula of programs of study, see the appropriate division of the preceding section.

Course numbers are to be interpreted as follows:

The first digit refers to the level of the course: 1-freshman, 2-sophomore, 3-junior, 4-senior; 0-designates a course that cannot be used to satisfy general education requirements nor provide credit toward any degree.

The middle two digits merely differentiate the course from others and have no meaning for the student.

Finally, the last digit refers to the number of "hours of credit" allowed for the course. Typically an "hour of credit" requires one hour of classroom work per week for the duration of a semester.

Accounting

ACCT2003 Accounting Principles I

Each semester. Fundamental process of accounting, books of original entry, preparation of working papers, adjusting entries, and financial statements for sole proprietorships. Accounting majors may not repeat this course to raise grade point in their major field after completing ACCT3013.

ACCT2013 Accounting Principles II

Each semester. Prerequisite: ACCT2003. Accounting processes applied to corporations and partnerships. Manufacturing cost, income tax, managerial reports, cash flow, and statement analysis. Accounting majors may not repeat this course to raise grade point in their major field after completing ACCT3013.

ACCT3003 Intermediate Accounting I

Prerequisites: ACCT2013; junior standing in School of Business. A comprehensive study of accounting theory governing preparation of financial statements with emphasis on conceptual framework, development of accounting standards, and the recording and reporting process. Cash, receivables, inventories, property, plant and equipment, intangible assets, and other selected topics.

ACCT3013 Intermediate Accounting II

Prerequisite: ACCT3003. Continuation of ACCT3003. Topics covered include current and long-term liabilities, contingencies, stockholders' equity, earnings per share, temporary and long-term investments, revenue recognition, accounting changes, cash flows, statement analysis, and disclosure in financial reporting.

ACCT3043 Federal Taxes I

Prerequisite: ACCT2013. A study of federal income tax laws and their relationship to other forms of taxation with primary emphasis on the determination of federal income tax liability and tax planning for individuals.

ACCT3053 Federal Taxes II

Prerequisite: ACCT3043. A study of federal income tax laws with primary emphasis on the determination of federal income tax liability and tax planning for entities other than individuals.

ACCT3063 Managerial Accounting

Prerequisite: ACCT2013. A study of accounting principles, concepts and procedures as an aid to management for internal use in planning, controlling and decision making. Financial statements, cost accounting, cost behavior, budgets, capital expenditures, pricing decisions, and other selected topics will be covered.

ACCT4003 Advanced Accounting I

Prerequisite: ACCT3013. A comprehensive study of complex accounting problems involving financial statement treatment of income taxes, pensions, and leases. Problems underlying accounting for partnerships, corporate liquidations and reorganization, and estates and trusts are examined.

ACCT4013 Advanced Accounting II

Prerequisite: ACCT3013. A comprehensive study of complex problems involving mergers and acquisitions, consolidated financial statements, segment and interim reporting, multinational accounting, SEC, and accounting theory.

ACCT4023 Cost Accounting

Spring. Basic principles of cost accounting, departmentalization, budgets, standard cost, variance analysis, joborder and process costs.

ACCT4033 Auditing

Fall. Prerequisite: ACCT3013. Auditing procedures and concepts, audit working papers and reports, evaluation of internal controls, legal and ethical environment.

ACCT4053 CPA Review

Spring. Prerequisites: Twenty-one semester credit hours of accounting. A review of problems relating to preparation for the C.P.A. examination. Emphasis on all four examination parts: practice auditing, law, and theory with concentration in theory and practice

ACCT40713 Seminar in Accounting

Prerequisite: Permission of the Department. Accounting topics of current interest will be covered. Coverage will include international accounting practices, S.E.C., and accounting ethics. Cases and small group activities will be utilized. Participants will prepare and present written and oral reports on topics under study. Credit for one to three hours may be earned depending upon the material covered.

ACCT4083-6 Internship in Accounting

Prerequisite: Permission of the Accounting Department Head and senior standing. A structured assignment which allows a senior accounting major to gain "real world" professional experience in an accounting position relating to an area of career interest. The student works full-time one semester in the office of a cooperating firm under the supervision of a member of management of that firm. An accounting faculty member will observe and consult with the student and the cooperating firm's management periodically during the period of internship. A term paper prepared by the student will be required.

ACCT4093 Governmental Accounting

Prerequisite: ACCT2013. Study of GAAP underlying accounting for governmental/nonprofit entities. Governmental, Proprietary, and Fiduciary funds along with Fixed Asset and Long-term Liability Account Groups are covered.

Agricultural Animal Science

AGAS1001 Principles of Animal Science Laboratory

Study of management and the facilities used in the production of beef cattle, swine, sheep, and horses. Laboratory mandatory for all animal science majors. Optional for others. Laboratory two hours.

AGAS1013 Principles of Animal Science

A study of the American livestock industry and the scientific principles underlying the management and production of livestock and poultry. Lecture three hours.

AGAS2083 Feeds and Feeding

Prerequisites: AGAS1013, CHEM1114, or consent of instructor. Principles of animal nutrition, characteristics of feed ingredients, feeding strategies, and formulation of rations for farm animals. Lecture three hours.

AGAS3003 Reproduction in Farm Animals

Prerequisite: AGAS1013 or consent of instructor. Anatomy and physiology of the reproductive system of farm animals; to include a study of the causes of reproductive failure, management to improve reproductive efficiency, and practical training in pregnancy testing and artificial insemination of cattle. Lecture three hours.

AGAS3013 Beef Cattle Management

Prerequisite: AGAS1013 or consent. A study of practices in management of beef cattle including breeding, feeding, care and marketing, with emphasis on production in the South. Lecture three hours.

AGAS3103 Swine Management

Prerequisite: AGAS1013 or consent of instructor. A study of current practices during the farrowing, growing, and finishing phases of swine production. Topics covered include housing, feeding, scheduling, reproduction, disease control, and waste disposal. Lecture three hours.

AGAS3113 Light Horse Production

Prerequisite: AGAS1013 or consent of instructor. A study of breeding, feeding, management, and diseasecontrol practices in light horse production. Lecture three hours.

AGAS3303 Poultry Management

Prerequisite: Junior standing or consent of instructor. A study of the management practices involved in the various phases of the production of eggs, broilers, turkeys, and breeders. Lecture three hours.

AGAS3323 Poultry Nutrition

Prerequisite: Junior standing or consent of instructor. An introductory course in poultry nutrition. A study of the essential nutrients for poultry, available sources of these nutrients and formulation of diets that supply the nutrients in their appropriate amounts. Lecture three hours.

AGAS3333 Poultry Processing and Product Technology

Prerequisite: Junior standing or consent of instructor. A study in depth of the overall industry practices and problems covering the processing, handling, marketing, and preparation of poultry meat and by-products. Lecture three hours.

AGAS4203 Animal Nutrition

Prerequisites: CHEM1114 and AGAS2083 or consent of instructor. Digestion, absorption of nutrients, and metabolism of farm animals. Includes a study of the requirements for maintenance, growth, activity, and reproduction of ruminants and non-ruminants. Lecture three hours.

AGAS4303 Poultry Diseases

Prerequisite: Junior standing or consent of instructor. The etiology, basic pathology, and combatants of bacterial, viral, protozoan, and mycotic diseases of poultry. Lecture three hours.

Agricultural Business and Economics

AGBU2063 Introduction to Agriculture Economics

Fall. Introduction to agriculture economic concepts and principles and their relationship to macrovariables in the free enterprise systems that affect agriculture. Lecture three hours.

AGBU2073 Principles of Agriculture Economics

Spring. An application of agriculture concepts and principles to agricultural firms in the economy with emphasis on production and costs function. Lecture three hours.

AGBU3143 Agriculture Economics

Prerequisite: AGBU2063 and 2073 or consent of instructor. A study of microeconomic theory and its application to the agriculture industry. Lecture three hours.

AGBU4003 Agri-Business Management

Prerequisite: Junior standing, or consent of the instructor. A study of the managerial practices and procedures that apply to all agriculture businesses. Emphasis is placed on the use and application of management and economic principles in decision making directed toward profit maximization. Lecture three hours.

AGBU4013 Agricultural Marketing

Prerequisite: AGBU2063 and 2073, or consent of instructor. A study of marketing functions, practice, organizational structure, legal aspects of agricultural marketing in relation to marketing policies, analysis of consumer behavior, and market demand. Lecture three hours.

AGBU4023 Agricultural Finance

Prerequisite: AGBU2063 and 2073 or consent of instructor. Designed as an economic study of the acquisition and use of capital in agriculture. Analytical procedures are used to determine how to allocate capital among alternative uses and to determine the amount of capital that can safely be used. Lending institutions are analyzed as to their purpose and efficiency in serving the agricultural sector of the economy. Lecture three hours.

AGBU4033 Agricultural Policy

Prerequisite: AGBU2063 and 2073 or consent of instructor. Designed as an introduction to historical and current federal governmental legislation in agriculture. Specific emphasis is placed on the logic, beliefs, attitudes and values of the American people coincident with the social, economic, and political environment, and on evaluating the objectives, means and the observed results through the criteria of resource allocation and income distribution in the agricultural sector of the economy. Lecture three hours.

AGBU4043 Appraisal of Farm Real Estate

Prerequisite: AGBU2063 and 2073, or consent of instructor. A practical application of principles and practices in farm real estate evaluation, emphasizing the processes of value development and uses. Lecture three hours.

AGBU49914 Special Problems In Agriculture

Prerequisite: Permission of the department. One to four hours credit, depending on the nature and extent of the problem. This is a course designed to introduce qualified students to specific agricultural areas including Agri Business internships and veterinary clinic experience. Laboratory and periods arranged.

Agricultural Engineering/Mechanization

AGEG3203 Soil, Water and Forest Conservation

Prerequisite: Junior standing or consent of instructor. Causes and control of soil and water losses; methods of erosion control; relationship of soil and water conservation to forest, recreation, pollution and wildlife management. Lecture three hours.

AGEG3213 Watershed Management

Prerequisite: Junior standing or consent of instructor. An introductory course in the problems of water supplies from surface sources and underground aquifers. Practices to develop supplies, to protect sources, and maintain water quality will be emphasized. Lecture three hours.

AGEG3413 Agricultural Waste Management

Prerequisites: MATH1103 or 1113, CHEM1114, and AGSS2013. A study of potential adverse environmental quality problems associated with agricultural operations, current trends and innovative solutions to waste management problems, and current legal constraints and regulating agencies. Lecture three hours.

Agricultural Plant Science

AGPS1003 Field Crops

Nature, importance, ecology, management growth characteristics, fundamental principles of production. Lecture three hours.

AGPS1023 General Horticulture

Principles and practices in propagation of plants, sexual and asexual reproduction methods; construction and management of greenhouses. Lecture three hours.

AGPS1033 Introduction to Forestry

General survey of the five fields of forestry; a preview of forestry subjects; forestry resources; some emphasis on silviculture, measurement, protection, utilization, preservation and forest administration. Lecture three hours.

AGPS3023 Forage Crops and Pasture Management

Prerequisites: Junior standing or consent of instructor. Selection, culture, production, distribution and uses of pasture and forage plants; management problems in hay and silage; emphasis on utilization and improvement of pasture. Lecture three hours.

AGPS3043 Plant Propagation

Prerequisite; Junior standing or consent of instructor. A study of the principles and practices in the propagation of herbaceous and woody indoor plants and flowers. Lecture three hours.

AGPS3053 Weeds and Weed Control

Prerequisite: Junior standing or consent of instructor. Identification, growth habits. and methods of control for weeds. Lecture three hours.

AGPS3063 Vegetable Growing

Prerequisite: Junior standing or consent of instructor. The application of scientific facts and principles that are involved in the successful production of vegetables under cover and/or in the open. Lecture three hours.

AGPS3073 Floriculture

Prerequisite: Junior standing or consent of instructor. Commercial production and marketing of major cut flower crops, bedding plants, and flowering pot plants under cover and/or in the open. Lecture three hours.

AGPS3083 Small Fruit and Nut Culture

Prerequisite: Junior standing or consent of instructor. A study of the factors underlying the commercial and home production of small fruits and nuts, including a study of varieties, propagation, pruning, spraying, harvesting, and marketing. Lecture three hours.

AGPS3093 Greenhouse Operation and Management

Prerequisite: Junior standing or consent of instructor. Greenhouse construction and management of heating, cooling, moisture, fertilization, lighting, insect and disease control in the growth of major greenhouse crops. Lecture three hours.

AGPS3244 Plant Pathology

Prerequisite: BIOL1134 or BIOL1014. Introductory course in plant diseases. A study of the causes, symptoms, spread and control of plant diseases. The emphasis is placed on the interaction between diseasecausing agents and the diseased plant and the way in which environmental conditions influence the mechanisms by which factors produce plant disease. Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours.

AGPS4103 Crop and Garden Insects

Prerequisite: Junior standing or consent of instructor. Anatomy, physiology, ecology, life history, and control of insects affecting crops and garden plants. Lecture three hours.

Agricultural Soil Science

AGSS2013 Soils

Prerequisite: CHEM1114. Origin, classification, physical and chemical properties of soils. A review of the major areas of soil science and their application to agricultural production. Lecture three hours.

AGSS3033 Soil Fertility

Prerequisite: AGSS2013. Physical, chemical, and biological properties that relate to soil fertility as measured by plant production and quality. Growth response to fertilizers and fertilization methods. Lecture three hours.

Allied Health Science

AHS1024 Basic Pharmacology with an Overview of Microbiology

Fall and Spring. Enrollment is limited to medical assistant and health information management majors. Topics to be covered in addition to introductory pharmacology will include basic chemistry as it applies to the medical laboratory and a brief overview of microbiology and immunology. Basic pharmacology as it relates to the drug interaction with each of the body systems and classifications of drugs will be covered. Students will utilize the Physicians' Desk Reference (PDR) in the course. Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours. $10 laboratory fee.

AHS2013 Medical Terminology

Fall and Spring. A study of the language of medicine including word construction, definition, and use of terms related to all areas of medical science, hospital service, and the allied health specialties. Duplicate credit for AHS2013 and 3013 will not be allowed.

AHS(BIOL)2022 Medical Laboratory Orientation and Instrumentation, Laboratory

Fall. Prerequisites: a grade of "C" or higher in a science course or approval of the instructor. Enrollment is limited to students that are enrolled in AHS2023. Topics covered will include laboratory orientation, laboratory procedures/techniques, introduction to clinical instrumentation (both manual and automated), quality control principles, and care of equipment. $10 laboratory fee.

AHS(BIOL)2023 Medical Laboratory Orientation and Instrumentation

Fall. Enrollment is limited to medical assistant and/or medical technology majors who have completed at least BIOL1114 or 1124 with a grade of "C" or better (AHS2013 recommended), and are in the final year of their program at Tech. This course is concerned with both the theoretical and practical application of a wide range of clinical duties performed by the medical assistant. Topics covered will include hematology, urinalysis, hematostatic processes, body chemistry, microbiology, blood typing, and electrocardiography. Lecture three hours.

AHS2031 Medical Assistant Clinical Practice Laboratory

Spring. Enrollment is limited to medical assistant majors who are enrolled in AHS2034. Students will be assigned to field laboratory settings in area clinics on a weekly basis. While at the medical facility they will apply the theories and concepts which are covered in AHS2023 and AHS2034. Threehour laboratory weekly. $10 laboratory fee.

AHS2034 Medical Assistant Clinical Practice

Spring. Enrollment is limited to medical assistant majors. Prerequisite: AHS2023 and 2022. Topics covered will include examination room techniques, sterilization procedures, operation and care of electrocardiograph, assisting with minor surgery, physiotherapy, pharmacology, medications and specialist assisting. Students must subscribe to malpractice liability insurance. Lecture four hours.

AHS2044 Medical Assistant Administrative Practice

Fall. Prerequisite: AHS2013. This course is open only to medical assistant majors in the final part of the program or by permission of the medical assistant program director. A survey course emphasizing the business administrative duties of the medical assistant. Course content will include working with patients, medical records, medical dictation, office procedures, and office management. Student must subscribe to malpractice liability insurance. Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours. $10 laboratory fee.

AHS2053 Computers in the Medical Office with an Overview of Insurance Procedures

Spring. Prerequisites: HIM2003, AHS2044. This course is open only to medical assistant majors in the final part of the program or by permission of the medical assistant program director. This course will prepare the medical assistant to work as an administrative medical assistant in a health care facility. Students are introduced to the computerization of the medical office using current operating systems. Topics covered will include recording information on patients, scheduling appointments, printing reports, producing patient statements and claim forms, and filing electronic claims. Lecture 3 hours.

AHS2055 Externship

First summer term. Prerequisites: Completion of all other required courses in medical assistant curriculum. The course is scheduled at the end of the program. It shall include the opportunity to perform various clinical and administrative procedures under supervision. The student will remain in a medical facility for a period of four weeks. Assignments may be made anywhere in Arkansas; students must assume the full financial responsibility for this assignment. A seminar will be scheduled for the fifth week. Student must subscribe to malpractice liability insurance.

AHS2061 Medical Assistant Seminar

First summer term. Prerequisite: AHS2055. A oneweek seminar scheduled for the week following the externship. Topics discussed will be based on those arising from the student's experiences while on his/her externship. Employment procedures will also be covered.

American Studies

AMST2003 American Studies

Prerequisite: ENGL1013 or equivalent. An exploration of American culture through study of significant ideas, social issues and literary texts. AMST2003 may be used to fulfill 3 hours of the Social Sciences general education requirements.

Anthropology

ANTH1213 Introduction to Anthropology

An introduction to the subdisciplines of cultural anthropology, physical anthropology, archeology, and linguistics.

ANTH2003 Cultural Anthropology

A study of contemporary and historical peoples and cultures of major world culture areas. May not be taken for credit after completion of ANTH3213.

ANTH3203 Indians of North America

A study of contemporary and historical peoples and cultures of North America.

ANTH3223 North American Archeology

The study of prehistoric peoples and cultures of North America.

ANTH3233 MesoAmerican Archeology

The study of prehistoric peoples and cultures of central and southern Mexico and western Central America.

ANTH32414 Seminar in Anthropology

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. A directed seminar in an area of anthropology. The specific focus will depend upon research interests, student interest, and current developments in the field of anthropology.

ANTH4206 Workshop in Anthropology

Fiveweek summer session. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and department head. An intensive fiveweek experience in anthropology combining classroom study and field exposure to techniques, artifacts, and findings pertinent to anthropology/archeology of North America. Extensive travel to sites and collections will be an integral part of the study experience. It may be necessary to assess a special fee which would be stated in advance.

ANTH(MUSM)4403 Interpretation/Education through Museum Methods

Prerequisites: Senior or Graduate standing, or permission of instructor. Museum perspectives and approaches to care and interpretation of cultural resources, including interpretive techniques of exhibit and education-outreach materials, and integrating museum interpretation/education into public school and general public programming. Class projects focus on special problems for managing interpretive materials in a museum setting. Graduate level projects or papers involve carrying out research relevant to the Museum's mission and relating to current Museum goals.

ANTH49914 Special Problems in Anthropology

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Independent work under individual guidance of staff member.

Art

ART(JOUR)1163 Basic Photography

A study of the use of the camera, films, equipment, and the basics of black and white processing and printing. Includes introductions to lighting techniques, composition, and color photography.

ART1203 Introduction to Graphic Design

An introduction to fundamental graphic design principles, techniques and materials, including the design and reproduction of letterforms. Studio six hours.

ART1303 Introduction to Drawing

An introduction to structural and expressive responses in drawing by the study of line, volume, shape, light perspective, the media, and their interrelations. Studio six hours.

ART1403 Two-dimensional Design

Basic study of elements and principles of two-dimensional design employing a variety of tools and materials. Studio six hours.

ART2103 Art History I, World

An examination of the periods and cultures responsible for major artistic monuments and achievements from prehistory through the Gothic period.

ART2113 Art History II, World

A survey of the events, people, and stylistic trends involved in the development of major art forms from the era of the Italian Renaissance to the present.

ART2123 Experiencing Art

This course is designed to provide a background in art and the related processes so that a student may develop powers of observation and thereby respond to a work of art.

ART2203 Applied Graphic Design

Prerequisite: ART1203. Application of fundamental graphic design principles, techniques, and materials to practical exercises. Studio six hours.

ART2303 Figure Drawing

Prerequisite: ART1303. Introduction to the study of the human figure. A major emphasis will be directed to exercises in the study of anatomy, proportion, and line as it relates to the figure. Studio six hours.

ART2403 Color Design

Basic application of color principles and color theory. Studio six hours.

ART2413 Three-dimensional Design

Prerequisite: ART1403. Basic study of three-dimensional problems of structure, spatial organization, and introductory sculptural concerns. Studio six hours.

ART2503 Introduction to Opaque Painting

Prerequisites: ART1303, 1403, 2403. The exploration of opaque painting techniques. Traditional oil, acrylic, and alkyd will be studied. Studio six hours.

ART2703 Introduction to Sculpture

Prerequisites: ART1303, 1403, 2413. Basic techniques of sculpture and sculptural composition. Modeling, casting, carving, and constructive processes are introduced. Studio six hours. $75 materials fee.

ART3003 Art Education I, K12

Participation in a wide variety of art experiences and basic skills. Laboratory six hours.

ART3013 Art Education II, K12

Participation in a wide variety of art experiences for the student preparing to teach upper grades. Assignments are developed using several media in a number of arts disciplines such as drawing, painting, design, sculpture, printmaking, art history, and crafts. Concentration on vocabulary, equipment, objectives, and appreciation of artists.

ART3113 Art History, American

A study of art forms in architecture, painting, sculpture and craft from Colonial times to the present.

ART3123 Art History, Renaissance

A concentrated study of art forms in architecture, painting, sculpture and crafts during the period of the Italian and Northern Renaissance.

ART3213 Basic Advertising Art

Studio problems in the design and layout of publication advertising. Studio six hours.

ART3223 Three-dimensional Advertising

Prerequisite: ART1203, 2413. Studio problems in the design and presentation of 3D advertising packaging and displays. Studio six hours.

ART3233 Production Techniques

Prerequisite: ART1203. Introductory course on methods for producing production art (mechanicals), as well as storyboards and other diagrams. Studio six hours.

ART3303 Drawing Studio I

Prerequisites: ART1303, 2303. The application of the theories and techniques of drawing as they relate to the study of composition will be covered, as well as the development of the concepts of economy and performance as applied to the finished drawing. Studio six hours.

ART3503 Painting Studio I

Prerequisite: ART2503. A continued study in the opaque or transparent painting techniques. Emphasis will be directed toward the economy of conception and performance in the completion of finished works of art. Studio six hours.

ART3533 Watercolor Painting

Prerequisite: ART1303, 1403, 2403. The exploration of transparent, gouache, and egg tempera water painting techniques. Studio six hours.

ART3603 Ceramics

An introduction to ceramics, emphasizing the imaginative design and production of ceramic objects utilizing hand building and wheel throwing techniques. Exposure to the complete ceramic process through the use of demonstrations, slides, and lectures. Studio six hours. $75 materials fee.

ART3703, 3713 Sculpture Studio I, II

Prerequisite: ART2703. A continued study of sculptural techniques introduced in Introduction to Sculpture, allowing for student expansion and specialization on individual conceptions. Studio six hours. $75 materials fee.

ART3803 Introduction to Printmaking

Prerequisites: ART1303, 1403, 2403. A survey of printmaking techniques and a history of each. Relief, intaglio, serigraphy, and lithography will be explored. Studio six hours. $75 materials fee.

ART3813 Printmaking Studio I

Prerequisite: ART3803. Printmaking activities introduced in Introduction to Printmaking will be used as a basis for the student to expand and specialize. Students will be expected to develop an individual print series in one or more print techniques. Studio six hours. $75 materials fee.

ART4103 Art History, Modern

The study of art and architecture from neoclassicism to the present with emphasis on the art styles after Impressionism.

ART(JOUR)4163 Advanced Photography

Prerequisite: ART (JOUR)1163 or JOUR3163 or consent of instructor. An introduction to advanced photographic techniques, including the Ansel Adams Zone System of negative exposure, development, and printing. Colorfilm processing and printing, studio photography, and special effects are also covered.

ART4213 Advanced Advertising Art

Prerequisite: ART3213. Continuation of ART3213 with advanced problems in advertising campaigns. Studio six hours.

ART4233 Techniques for Illustration

Prerequisites: ART1403, 2303, 3213. Application of fine art drawing and painting techniques to illustration problems. Studio six hours.

ART4313, 4323 Drawing Studio II, III

Prerequisite: ART3303. The further development of advanced drawing concepts and skills. This course will deal with each student on a onetoone basis. The student will present a "contract of drawing projects" subject to instructor's approval. Studio six hours.

ART4503, 4513 Painting Studio II, III

Prerequisite: ART3503. Advanced study of the opaque/transparent painting techniques. Emphasis will be theme oriented. Each student must submit to the instructor a "painting contract" which must be approved. Studio six hours.

ART4603, 4613 Ceramics Studio I, II

Prerequisites: ART3603, 3613. A study of advanced techniques and skills. This course will deal with each student on a onetoone basis. Each student must submit a "contract of ceramics project" subject to instructor's approval. Studio six hours. $75 materials fee.

ART4701 Special Methods in Art

Prerequisites: Admission to student teaching phase of teacher education program and concurrent enrollment in SEED4809. Intensive oncampus exploration of the principles of curriculum construction, teaching methods, use of community resources, and evaluation as related to teaching art.

ART4703 Senior Project and Exhibition

Prerequisite: Review of student's progress during junior year. This is a required course for graphic design and fine arts majors and may serve as an elective for art education majors. Additional special problems courses may be required as a result of the review.

ART4803, 4813 Printmaking Studio II, III

Prerequisite: ART3813. A concentration on printmaking techniques which will develop additional strength and capability in the student. Studio six hours. $75 materials fee.

ART49914 Special Problems in Art

This course requires advance approval by the instructor, department head, and the dean of school. Designed to provide certain advanced students with further concentration in a particular area.

Biology

BIOL(PHSC)1004 Principles of Environmental Science

On demand. This course is designed to bring the student to a basic but informed awareness of and responsible behavior toward our environment and the role of the human race therein. The content will include a study of the philosophical and scientific basis for the study of ecosystems and the environment, the nature of ecosystems, the techniques used to study the environment, the origin and development of current environmental problems, the interdisciplinary nature of environmental studies, the processes of critical thinking and problem solving, and the moral and ethical implications of environmentally-mandated decisions. Lecture three hours, Lab three hours. $10 laboratory fee.

BIOL1014 Introduction to Biological Science

Each semester. An introduction to the major terms and concepts that explain biological science, with an emphasis on the development of this scientific perspective and its effect on humans. Duplicate credit for BIOL1014 and BIOL1114 will not be allowed. May not be taken for credit after completion of BIOL1114, 1124, or 1134. Lecture three hours. Laboratory two hours. $10 laboratory fee.

BIOL1114 Principles of Biology

Each semester. Prerequisite: scores of 19 or higher on the reading and science reasoning portions of the enhanced ACT; or a grade of "C" or higher in a science course; or approval of the instructor. Duplicate credit for BIOL1014 and BIOL1114 will not be allowed. An indepth study of biological principles and the interrelationships of biology with other sciences. Topics included are: cellular structure, intermediary metabolism and differentiation, population genetics, ecology, and evolution. Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours. $10 laboratory fee.

BIOL1124 Principles of Zoology

Each semester. Prerequisite: scores of 19 or higher on the reading and science reasoning portions of the enhanced ACT; or BIOL1014 or BIOL1114; or approval of the instructor. A survey of the major animal phyla: morphology, physiology, and natural history. Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours. $10 laboratory fee.

BIOL1134 Principles of Botany

Each semester. Prerequisite: scores of 19 or higher on the reading and science reasoning portions of the enhanced ACT; or BIOL1014 or BIOL1114; or approval of the instructor. Introduction to the structure, function, classification, and importance of nonvascular and vascular plants. Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours. $10 laboratory fee.

BIOL2004 Basic Human Anatomy and Physiology

Each semester. Prerequisites: a grade of "C" or higher in a science course or approval of the instructor. This course may not be taken for credit after completion of BIOL2014, 3074, or equivalent. This course is intended for students who have a need for basic studies in functional aspects of the organ systems of the human body. Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours. $10 laboratory fee.

BIOL2014 Human Anatomy

Each semester. Prerequisites: a grade of "C" or higher in a science course or approval of the instructor. This is an introductory course in human anatomy which should be useful to students in the biological and healthoriented fields. The course is designed to present an introduction to the unified concepts and data that contribute to a basic understanding of the structure of the human body. The course will include familiarization with essential technical vocabulary; reference to general functions of organs and organ systems; and brief encounters with histology, embryology, and comparative anatomy. Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours. $10 laboratory fee.

BIOL(AHS)2022 Medical Laboratory Orientation and Instrumentation, Laboratory

Fall. Prerequisites: BIOL1114 or BIOL1124. Enrollment is limited to students enrolled also in BIOL2023. Topics covered will include laboratory orientation, laboratory procedures/techniques, introduction to clinical laboratory instrumentation (both manual and automated), quality control principles, and care of equipment. Laboratory four hours per week. $10 laboratory fee.

BIOL(AHS)2023 Medical Laboratory Orientation and Instrumentation

Fall. Enrollment is limited to medical assistant and/or medical technology majors who have completed at least BIOL1114 or BIOL1124 (AHS2013 recommended) and are in the final year of their program at Tech. This course is concerned with both the theoretical and practical application of a wide range of clinical duties performed by the medical assistant and medical technologist. Topics covered will include hematology, urinalysis, hematostatic processes, body chemistry, microbiology, blood typing, and electrocardiography. Lecture three hours.

BIOL(CHEM,GEOL)2111 Environmental Seminar

(See BIOL4111).

BIOL(PHSC)3003 Science in Elementary and Middle School Education

Fall and Spring. Prerequisite: Junior standing. Materials, methods, and procedures for teaching modern elementary science. Includes the development of invitations to inquiry in science and the application of a modern science curriculum to the elementary and middle schools. $10 laboratory fee.

BIOL3004 Plant Taxonomy

Spring. Prerequisite: BIOL1114 and 1134 or permission of instructor. An overview of the major principles of classification, identification, naming, and collection of representatives of vascular plants. Lecture two hours, laboratory four hours. $10 laboratory fee.

BIOL(PHSC)3013 Science Education in the Secondary School

Fall. Prerequisites: CHEM2124, PHYS2014 and 2124, BIOL1114, 1124, and 1134. A course outlining methods, materials, and procedures for secondary science education. Curriculum development and planning skills utilizing various instructional media and inquiry methodology are emphasized. Design and execution of learning activities for a secondary school setting are required. Lecture/lab three hours. $10 laboratory fee.

BIOL3014 Comparative Anatomy

On demand. Prerequisite: BIOL1124. A comparative study of the vertebrate classes in terms of their organ systems. An emphasis is placed on evolution from aquatic to terrestrial forms and significant phylogenetic trends. Lecture two hours, laboratory four hours. $10 laboratory fee.

BIOL(PSY)3023 Animal Behavior

On demand. Prerequisites: a biology course and a psychology course, or approval of the instructor. An indepth introduction to animal behavior. The course focuses on comparisons of behavioral patterns exhibited by species on a gradient from simple to complex organisms and will cover the entire range of behavioral responses from simple taxes to complex learning. Lecture two hours, laboratory two hours. $10 laboratory fee.

BIOL3024 Embryology

On demand. Prerequisite: BIOL1124. A comparative study of the development of the frog, pig, and chick, and an introduction to human embryology. Lecture two hours, laboratory four hours. $10 laboratory fee.

BIOL3034 Genetics

Each semester. Prerequisites: BIOL1114 (or equivalent) and MATH1113 (or higher). Introduction to and discussion of the principles of Mendelian, molecular and population genetics with a strong emphasis on problem solving. Laboratory exercises will involve hands-on experience with microbes, plants, animals and fungi using traditional and molecular techniques. Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours. $10 laboratory fee.

BIOL3043 Conservation

On demand. Prerequisite: BIOL/CHEM/GEOL2111. A study of natural resources, their utilization in a technical society, and factors leading to their depletion. Lecture three hours.

BIOL3054 Microbiology

Each semester. Prerequisites: One semester of chemistry and one semester of biology. An introduction to the microbial world with an emphasis on prokaryotes. Identification of bacteria based on staining, immunologic reactions, morphology and physiology. Symbionts and pathogens of human and domestic animals. Principles of control using chemical and physical agents. An overview of virology and immunology. Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours. $10 laboratory fee.

BIOL3064 Parasitology

Spring. Prerequisite: BIOL1124. A survey of parasitism in the various phyla. Special emphasis is given to parasites that affect humans. Lecture two hours, laboratory four hours. $10 laboratory fee.

BIOL3074 Human Physiology

On demand. Prerequisites: C grade or better in BIOL2014 and CHEM1114 or CHEM2124. An introduction to the function of vertebrate body systems, i.e., muscle action, digestion, circulation, nervous control, endocrine, metabolism and respiration, with special emphasis on the human body. Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours. $10 laboratory fee.

BIOL(FW)3084 Ichthyology

Fall. Prerequisite: BIOL1124. Systematics, collection, identification, natural history, and importance of fishes. Lecture two hours, laboratory four hours. $10 laboratory fee.

BIOL3094 Entomology

Fall, Prerequisite: BIOL1124. Introduction to the world of insects: morphological and physiological adaptations, classification, methods and collecting and preserving common insects. Lecture two hours, laboratory four hours. $10 laboratory fee.

BIOL(CHEM, GEOL)3111 Environmental Seminar

(See BIOL4111).

BIOL(FW)3114 Principles of Ecology

Fall and Spring. Prerequisites: BIOL1124, 1134, and one semester of chemistry. Responses of organisms to environmental variables, bioenergetics, population dynamics, community interactions, ecosystem structure and function, and major biogeographical patterns. Lecture two hours, laboratory four hours. $10 laboratory fee.

BIOL3124 General Physiology

Fall and Spring. Prerequisites: BIOL1114, 1124, 1134, and two semesters of chemistry. An indepth study of basic physiology employing examples of both plants and animals. Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours. $10 laboratory fee.

BIOL3134 Invertebrate Zoology

Spring. Prerequisites: BIOL1114, 1124, 1134, and two semesters of chemistry. Morphology, physiology, natural history and taxonomy of major invertebrate phyla. Laboratory maintenance and preservation techniques. Lecture two hours, laboratory four hours. $10 laboratory fee.

BIOL(FW)3144 Ornithology

Spring. Prerequisite: BIOL1124. An introduction to the biology of birds. The course covers aspects of anatomy, physiology, behavior, natural history, evolution, and conservation of birds. Laboratories address field identification and natural history of the birds of Arkansas. Students will be expected to participate in an extended 5-7 day field trip. Lecture two hours, laboratory four hours. $10 laboratory fee.

BIOL(FW)3154 Mammalogy

Fall. Prerequisite: BIOL1124. Taxonomy, identification, ecology, and study natural history of the mammals. Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours. $10 laboratory fee.

BIOL(FW)3163 Biodiversity and Conservation Biology

Spring. Prerequisites: FW(BIOL)3114 and one of the following: BIOL3004, FW(BIOL)3084, BIOL3094, BIOL3134, FW(BIOL)3144, FW(BIOL)3154, BIOL4224, or permission of instructor. The concepts of, processes that produce, and factors that threaten biological diversity are introduced and examined. Further emphasis is placed on unique problems associated with small population size, management of endangered species, and practical applications of conservation biology. Lecture three hours.

BIOL(NUR)3803 Applied Pathophysiology

Each semester. Prerequisites: BIOL2014 and BIOL3074. This course focuses on the mechanisms and concepts of selected pathological disturbances in the human body. Emphasis is placed on how the specific pathological condition effects the functioning of the system involved, as well as its impact on all other body systems. Lecture 3 hours.

BIOL(PHSC)4003 History and Philosophy of Science

On demand. Prerequisite: a Sophomore-level science course (or higher). A course in the historical development and philosophical basis of modern science. BIOL (PHSC) 5003 may not be taken for credit after completion of this course. Three hours lecture.

BIOL4023 Immunology

Spring. Prerequisites: Four hours each in biology and chemistry and/or consent of instructor. An overview of the human immune system, including cellular and humoral defense mechanisms, immunity to infection, hypersensitivity, transplant rejection, and tumor destruction. Immune deficiency and autoimmune diseases. Antibody structure and the use of antibodies in medicine and research. Three hours lecture.

BIOL(FW)4024 Limnology

Spring. Prerequisite: BIOL(FW)3114. A study of physical and chemical processes in fresh water and their effects on organisms in lakes and streams. Laboratory sessions and field trips demonstrate limnological instrumentation and methodology. Lecture two hours, laboratory four hours. $10 laboratory fee.

BIOL4033 Cell Biology

Fall. Prerequisites: BIOL1114, 1124 or 1134 plus four additional hours of biology and one course from BIOL3034, 3054, 4023 or CHEM3343; eight hours of chemistry. The primary goal of this course is to introduce the basic cell structures and the molecular mechanisms whereby the cell functions through the directed application of energy and processing of information. Topics include methods of cell study, cellular organelles and their ultrastructures, membrane structure and function, cell differentiation, and reproduction. Lecture three hours.

BIOL4044 Dendrology

Fall. Prerequisites: BIOL1114 and 1134. A study of woody plants with emphasis on field recognition throughout the year. Lecture two hours, laboratory four hours. $10 laboratory fee.

BIOL4054 Vertebrate Histology

Prerequisites: BIOL1114, 1124 and an additional four hours in biology. A study of functional/structural relationship of cells, tissues, and organs. Exercises in the preparation and observation of tissues and development of general principles of microtechniques. Lecture two hours, laboratory four hours. $10 laboratory fee.

BIOL4064 Evolutionary Biology

Spring. Prerequisite: BIOL3034 or permission of instructor. This course focuses upon the principles and major concepts in evolutionary biology from a historical and contemporary viewpoint. Morphological and molecular evolution, population genetics, systematics, the fossil record, a history of life on earth, macroevolution, and adaptation are among the topics examined in this course. Lecture 3 hours, lab 3 hours. $10 laboratory fee.

BIOL4074 Molecular Genetics

Spring. Prerequisite: BIOL3034. This course continues the material introduced in Genetics (BIOL3034) with a focus upon the major concepts and techniques in contemporary molecular genetics. Current viewpoints of the gene, gene regulation, developmental genetics, recombinant DNA technology, genomics, proteonomics, and molecular evolution are among the topics examined in the course. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours. $10 laboratory fee.

BIOL4091 Coastal Ecology

On demand. Restricted to senior majors in the Department of Biological Sciences and others upon approval of instructor. Course provides an introduction to coastal ecology, as represented by the Mississippi Gulf Coast. Coastal plants, animals, their interactions, and relationship to the physical environment will be studied during this trip to the Gulf Coast Research Laboratory. Investigations will be conducted in the marshes, bays, estuaries, bogs, and barrier island system near the Laboratory. Students bear the cost of food and a nominal housing fee.

BIOL(CHEM,GEOL)4111 Environmental Seminar

Spring. A seminar for students pursuing the environmental option of biology, chemistry, or geology and other students interested in environmental sciences.

BIOL4116 Biology Internship

Each semester. Prerequisite: junior or senior standing. The course will allow students to gain experience in an occupational environment. Students will be placed in positions under the direction of a faculty advisor and work supervisor with approval of the program committee. The program will emphasize application of classroom knowledge to career goals. A minimum of 400 clock hours of supervision, a written or oral report, and a portfolio are required.

BIOL4224 Herpetology

Spring. Prerequisite: BIOL1124. A course dealing with the origin, phylogeny, anatomical and physiological features, classification, population dynamics, behavior, and distribution of amphibians and reptiles. Taxa included are families of the world, genera of North America, and species of Arkansas. Lecture two hours, laboratory four hours. $10 laboratory fee.

BIOL4701 Special Methods in Biology

Fall and Spring. Prerequisites: Admission to student teaching phase of the teacher education program and concurrent enrollment in SEED4909. Intensive oncampus exploration of the principles of curriculum construction, teaching methods, use of community resources, and evaluation as related to teaching biology.

BIOL4891 Seminar in Biology

Fall and Spring. Prerequisite: an upper level science course. Designed to integrate all aspects of biology by covering current topics in many fields of biology and to acquaint the student with fields of biology not covered in the general curriculum.

BIOL49914 Directed Research

Each semester. Open to biology majors with approval of department head and the individual instructor who will advise on research topic. Research may vary to fit the needs and interests of the student. Unless permission is granted by the department head, no more than two credit hours will be given in any semester for a particular research topic.

Business Administration

BUAD1001 Keyboarding I

Computer keyboarding instruction and supervised practice with emphasis on alphabetic and numeric keyboard and ten-key pad applications.

BUAD1003 Introduction to Business Systems

Fundamentals of organizing and managing business enterprises and the American enterprise system. Principles and framework for analysis of business problems with a systems emphasis. May not be taken for credit after completion of MGMT3003.

BUAD2002 Keyboarding II

Prerequisite: BUAD1001 or equivalent. Computer keyboarding applications including speed and accuracy drills, formatting, and document production of letters, memos, reports, and tables.

BUAD2003 Business Information Systems

Each semester. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. An introduction to business information systems with emphasis on concepts and applications utilizing spreadsheets, word processing, and database management as productivity tools; provides basic rationale for using computers in generating and managing information necessary for the business decisionmaking process.

BUAD2033 Legal Environment of Business

Each semester. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. A survey of the basic framework of the American and international legal systems, including civil procedure, constitutional law, administrative regulation, and topics in business law, with particular emphasis on the ethical, sociocultural and political influences affecting such environments.

BUAD2043 Principles of Word Processing

Prerequisite: BUAD2002 or equivalent. A course designed to develop technology skills using current software; application documents include letters, memos, reports, tables, desktop publishing, and graphics for business as well as personal use.

BUAD2053 Business Statistics

Each semester. Prerequisites: MATH1113 and/or 2243. An introduction to basic descriptive and inferential statistics and their application to business problems. Topics covered include frequency distributions, histograms, the mean, standard deviation, variance, covariance, and correlation coefficients for samples and populations, confidence intervals and hypothesis tests for means and proportions, analysis of variance, simple linear regression, chi-square, control charts for variables and attributes, and time-series analysis.

BUAD2073 Principles of Real Estate

An orderly approach of study to prepare students for the Uniform License Examination. Topics covered include contracts, real estate financing ownership, brokerage, valuation, settlements, arithmetic review, forms of ownership, title transfer, mortgage instruments, deeds, leases, title closing, contract laws, real estate taxes, property descriptions, and other pertinent areas.

(Additional prerequisites for 3000 and 4000level courses are listed in the School of Business section of this catalog.)

BUAD3023 Business Communications

Each semester. Prerequisites: 6 hours of English Composition and BUAD2003. Course includes principles of effective business communication using technology to generate documents including letters, memos, and reports; international, ethical, legal, and interpersonal topics are integrated throughout the course.

BUAD3063 Commercial Law

Prerequisites: BUAD2033. An in-depth analysis of the Uniform Commercial Code and its effect on the business environment. Course focuses on sales, negotiable instruments, secured transactions, and bankruptcy. Significant federal and state statutes affecting commerce also are explored.

BUAD40013 Problems in Business Administration

On demand. Prerequisites: Senior standing and permission of department head. Individual exploration of significant topics and problems in business administration under the direction of an assigned faculty member. A report will be required.

BUAD4073 Special Topics in Law

Prerequisite: BUAD2033. Course offers an in-depth exploration of selected legal issues affecting business. The primary focus of the course will vary from offering to offering; thus the course may be taken more than once.

Chemistry

CHEM1114 A Survey of Chemistry

Each semester. A survey of selected topics in chemistry for life science majors. A brief introduction to fundamental concepts, atomic structure, chemical bonding, and periodic law as applied in the life sciences and allied areas. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours. May not be taken for credit after completion of CHEM2124 or 2134. $10 laboratory fee.

CHEM(BIOL,GEOL)2111 Environmental Seminar

(See CHEM4111).

CHEM2124 General Chemistry I

Each semester. Prerequisites: scores of 21 or higher on the math and the English portions of the enhanced ACT, a "C" or better in CHEM1114, or approval by the department head of Physical Sciences. The first of a two semester sequence designed for science and engineering majors. Topics include qualitative and quantitative, applied and theoretical analyses of the interactions of matter; atoms, molecules, ions, the mole concept, chemical equations, gases, solutions, intermolecular forces, thermochemistry, quantum theory, periodic law, ionic and covalent bonding, molecular geometry. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours. $10 laboratory fee.

CHEM2134 General Chemistry II

Each semester. Prerequisite: completion of CHEM2124 or equivalent. A continuation of CHEM2124, encompassing chemical kinetics, equilibrium, acid/base systems, atmospheric chemistry, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, descriptive inorganic chemistry and nuclear chemistry. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours. $10 laboratory fee.

CHEM2143 Environmental Chemistry

Spring, Prerequisite: One semester of chemistry. An examination of the chemistry of the environment including the origins, natural processes, and anthropogenic influences on the earth. Will not be counted for chemistry credit toward the ACS approved BS in chemistry.

CHEM2201 Chemistry Seminar

(See CHEM4401).

CHEM2204 Organic Physiological Chemistry

Spring semester. Prerequisites: CHEM1114 or CHEM2124. For students who desire only one semester of organic/physiologic chemistry, such as wildlife biology and various allied health programs. A brief introduction to organic and physiological chemistry. The structures, reactions and biological aspects of organic compounds will be stressed. Will not be counted for chemistry credit toward the ACS approved BS in chemistry. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours. $10 lab fee.

CHEM29913 Special Problems in Chemistry

Permission of instructor. One to three credits, depending on the nature and extent of the problem. This course is designed to encourage creative, independent scientific activity on the part of advanced students. Problems will be designed to fit the future aspirations of individual students and will be supervised by a faculty mentor.

CHEM(BIOL,GEOL)3111 Environmental Seminar

(See CHEM4111).

CHEM3245 Quantitative Analysis

Spring. Prerequisites: CHEM2134. This is a lab intensive course, that focuses on a variety of experimental techniques that enable the chemist to characterize and quantify many types of samples. Lecture three hours, laboratory six hours. $10 laboratory fee.

CHEM3254 Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry

Fall. Prerequisites: CHEM2124. An introduction to the chemistry of covalently bonded carbon. Special emphasis will be given to descriptive and structural aspects of Organic Chemistry. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours. $10 laboratory fee.

CHEM3264 Mechanistic Organic Chemistry

Spring. Prerequisite: Completion of CHEM3254 or equivalent. A continuation of CHEM3254 with special emphasis on theory and mechanisms of organic reactions. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours. $10 laboratory fee.

CHEM3301 Chemistry Seminar

(See CHEM4401).

CHEM3324 Physical Chemistry I

Fall. Prerequisites: CHEM3245, PHYS2024, or 2124, MATH2924. Upper division chemistry course designed for chemistry, physical science, and engineering majors desiring a deeper understanding of the physical and mathematical processes of chemistry. Course content includes ideal and non-ideal gases, laws of thermodynamics, enthalpy, heat capacity, free energy, Maxwell's relations, chemical and phase equilibria, electrochemical equilibria, fugacities, activity coefficients, mixtures, colligative properties, surfaces. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours. $10 laboratory fee.

CHEM3334 Physical Chemistry II

Spring. Prerequisites: MATH2924, PHYS2024 or 2124, CHEM3324 and 3245. Continuation of CHEM3324 (Physical Chemistry I). Upper division chemistry course designed for chemistry, physical science and engineering majors desiring a deeper understanding of the physical and mathematical processes of chemistry. Course content includes chemical kinetics and reaction mechanisms, molecular collisions, transition state theory, quantum mechanics, electronic structure of atoms and diatomic molecules, molecular spectroscopy, solid-state chemistry. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours. $10 laboratory fee.

CHEM3341 Biochemistry Laboratory

Corequisite: CHEM3343. An introduction to biochemical laboratory techniques in purification, identification, and characterization of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and vitamins. Laboratory three hours. $10 laboratory fee.

CHEM3343 Principles of Biochemistry

Upon demand. Prerequisite: CHEM3254. The chemistry of metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids, and proteins. Basic concepts of the biochemistry of vitamins and enzymes, biological oxidations, and bioenergetics. Lecture three hours.

CHEM3353 Fundamentals of Toxicology

Upon demand. Prerequisite CHEM3254. An introduction to the science of poisons. Toxicological principles studied include structures, dose/response relationships, metabolism, mechanism of action, and gross effects of chemicals.

CHEM3363 Metabolic Biochemistry

Prerequisites: CHEM3343. The study of metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids, and the study of biological information flow in organisms. Metabolic pathways and genetic informational flow in plants and animals will be addressed. Lecture three hours.

CHEM39913 Special Problems in Chemistry

Permission of instructor. One to three credits, depending on the nature and extent of the problem. This course is designed to encourage creative, independent scientific activity on the part of advanced students. Problems will be designed to fit the future aspirations of individual students and will be supervised by a faculty mentor.

CHEM(BIOL,GEOL)4111 Environmental Seminar

Spring. A seminar for students pursuing the environmental option of chemistry, biology, or geology and other students interested in environmental sciences.

CHEM4401 Chemistry Seminar

Spring. Participants will prepare written reviews, present oral reports, and defend their reports. Emphasis will be on the use of the library and current chemical research.

CHEM4414 Instrumental Analysis

Fall. Prerequisite: CHEM3245. This course is designed for chemistry majors. It will focus on the understanding of the instrumental methods used in analytical chemistry. A variety of spectrometric, chromatographic, and electrometric techniques will be covered in the lecture and laboratory. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours. $10 laboratory fee.

CHEM4422 Advanced Organic Chemistry

Upon demand. Prerequisite: CHEM3264. An expansion and/or continuation of theoretical topics addressed in CHEM3264.

CHEM4424 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry

Spring. Prerequisite: CHEM3324. CHEM4424 is a senior level inorganic chemistry course. The course gives an overview of some of the many advanced areas of study in inorganic chemistry including atomic and molecular structure, acid-base chemistry, symmetry and group theory, coordination chemistry and organometallic chemistry. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours. $10 laboratory fee.

CHEM44324 Advanced Topics in Chemistry

Upon demand. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Various advanced topics in any specialty area of chemistry, e.g., polymers, coordination chemistry, and nuclear chemistry.

CHEM49914 Special Problems in Chemistry

Permission of instructor. One to four credits, depending on the nature and extent of the problem. This course is designed to encourage creative, independent scientific activity on the part of advanced students. Problems will be designed to fit the future aspirations of individual students and will be supervised by a faculty mentor.

Chinese

CHIN1014 Beginning Chinese I

Emphasis on conversation; introduction to basic grammar, reading, writing, and culture.

CHIN1024 Beginning Chinese II

Continued emphasis on conversation and fundamental language skills.

CHIN2014 Intermediate Chinese I

Prerequisite: Beginning Chinese II (CHIN1024) or equivalent. Instruction designed to develop communication skills and knowledge of grammar, reading, writing, and culture.

CHIN2024 Intermediate Chinese II

Prerequisite: Intermediate ChineseI (CHIN2014) or equivalent. Instruction designed to enhance communication skills and knowledge of grammar, reading, writing, and culture.

Computer and Information Science

COMS1003 Introduction to Computer Based Systems

Provides students with both computer concepts and hands-on applications. Although little or no prior computer experience is required, keyboarding proficiency is assumed. Topics include PC basics, file maintenance, and hardware and software components. Students will also gain experience in the use of several popular software applications including Windows, e-mail, Internet, word processing, spreadsheets, databases, presentation packages, and integration of these applications.

COMS1103 FORTRAN Programming

Prerequisite: MATH1113 or equivalent. An introduction to programming using the FORTRAN language with emphasis on numerical computing, including the use of scientific subroutine libraries.

COMS1201 Introduction to Spreadsheets

Prerequisite: COMS1101 or equivalent experience. An introduction to the use of spreadsheets for persons with little or no prior experience. Coverage includes the use of commands, simple functions and formulas, printing, and simple graphs.

COMS1203 Programming in BASIC

An introduction to programming using BASIC and/or Visual Basic.

COMS1301 Introduction to Word Processing

Prerequisite: COMS1101 or equivalent experience. An introduction to word processing for those with little or no prior experience. Coverage includes basic text entry and editing, document formatting, block operations, spell checking, printing, and loading and saving files.

COMS1303 Computer Applications for Technical Majors

Corequisite: MATH1113 or equivalent. The purpose of this course is to give the students in engineering, mathematics, chemistry, and other technical disciplines the prerequisite computer skills necessary to make effective use of the computer in their major degree programs where computer applications have been integrated into the course of study.

COMS1333 Web Publishing I

This course introduces the student to the World Wide Web and design and development of web pages. Topics covered include HTML, images, style sheets, multimedia, CGI and forms, and other topics as appropriate. The students will learn how to publish a web site to a server and maintain the site. This course will focus on design issues.

COMS1401 Introduction to Database Systems

Prerequisite; COMS1101 or equivalent experience. An introduction to database management systems for those with little or no prior experience. Coverage includes elementary database design, record layouts, simple selection operations, and basic report generation.

COMS1403 Computer and Information Science Orientation

(Required of all firsttime entering freshmen who have declared a major in computer science.) An introduction to the profession of computing and information systems. Topics include ethics, professionalism, and opportunities within the field as well as an overview of hardware, software, and information system concepts and terminology. Students will be introduced to available computing facilities and software. Course will be taught using a combination of lecture and computer laboratory.

COMS1521 ComputerAided Design Graphics

Prerequisite: COMS1501 or consent. An introduction to ComputerAided Design (CAD) packages. Handson experience will be gained in the use of one or more such packages and their applications in various disciplines, particularly in drafting.

COMS1561 Presentation Graphics

Prerequisite: COMS1501 or consent. Covers the use of presentation graphics packages in the preparation of graphs, charts, and presentations. Students will complete a presentationquality project related to their field of study.

COMS1903 Applied Computer Graphics

Prerequisite: Three hours in computer science. A fundamental and hands-on coverage of various PC-based drawing and graphics packages.

COMS2003 Microcomputer Applications

This course provides the knowledge and skill required to apply microcomputers in a variety of disciplines. Students will gain hands-on experience in the use of several popular software packages including word processing, spreadsheets and database management. Students will be required to apply each package on projects relating to their field of study. Includes an introduction to the management of a microcomputer system using Windows. A basic background in computer technology, concepts, and operation comparable to COMS1003 is required for all students enrolling in this course.

COMS2103 Foundations of Computer Programming I

Corequisite: MATH1113. An introduction to structured programming using C++. This course provides the fundamental programming knowledge required for further study in the field of computer science.

COMS2163 Scripting Languages

This course introduces the student to script writing in several languages. The primary categories of scripts will be UNIX shell, text processing, and Perl. CGI Scripts, using Perl, will be introduced.

COMS2203 Foundations of Computer Programming II

This course is a continuation of COMS2103. Topics include multi-dimensional arrays, functions, string processing, and an introduction to object-oriented programming.

COMS2213 Data Structures

Prerequisite: COMS2203 or consent. This course involves a study of abstract data structures and the implementation of these abstract concepts as computer algorithms.

COMS2223 Computer Organization and Programming

Prerequisite: COMS2203. Covers computer architecture and machinelevel programming in assembly language. Considerable practical experience will be gained through programming projects. Topics include internal data representation and manipulation, physical, and logical level inputoutput macros.

COMS2233 Introduction to Databases

This course develops a detailed understanding of a database software package developed for microcomputer applications. Topics include how to design, implement, and access a personal database. Entity relationship diagrams are emphasized in design. The use of macros, data conversion operations, linking, and complex selection operations are used in implementation. Advanced report generation mechanisms are covered along with custom-designed menus and user interfaces.

COMS2333 Web Publishing II

This course is a continuation of COMS1333. Topics include Web Server installation and configuration, writing and using CGI scripts, security issues, and ethics. Additional topics may include active server pages, DHTML, and XML.

COMS2503 AS/400 Operations Using RPG

Prerequisite: COMS2203 or consent. The student will study the aspects of computing that are characteristic of minicomputer use in the business environment. The RPG language will be used to solve typical business problems using the AS/400 platform.

COMS2703 Computer Networks

This course covers how to install and administer a local area network and connect it to the Internet. Topics include network architecture, hardware, and software, along with popular protocols for establishing connectivity for sharing resources such as printers and files.

COMS2713 Survey of Operating Systems

Several Operating Systems (such as Unix, Microsoft, AS/400) will be examined with regard to the user's view of the system. This view includes the types of files supported, the kinds of operations that can be performed on files (from the shell and from programs), the mechanisms for starting and controlling processes (i.e. "running programs"), some basic utility programs that a beginning or intermediate level administrator would need to use.

COMS2723 PC Computer Architecture and Operating Systems

Organization, construction, and diagnosis of PC computers, as well as the installation and configuration of several operating systems, such as DOS, Windows 95, Windows 98, Windows NT, and Linux. The lab component includes installation of PC components and diagnosis of PC conflicts.

COMS2803 Programming in C

Prerequisites: COMS2203, or COMS1103 and ENGR2134, or consent. Design, coding, debugging, and implementation of C programs. Introduction to the UNIX operating system.

COMS2981-4 Special Topics

This course will be offered on an "as-needed" basis to cover those topics and subject areas in computing that are emerging in a technological sense, but that do not yet warrant the addition of a new course to the curriculum. This course may be repeated for credit if course content differs.

COMS3033 Application Program Development I

Prerequisite: COMS2223. Program design, development, testing, implementation, and maintenance in a business application environment. Topics include file structures, batch file processing, and indexed file processing.

COMS3043 Application Program Development II

Prerequisite: COMS3033; ACCT2003. A continuation of COMS3033. Topics include advanced indexed file processing, interactive processing, and cross-platform development. One or more small systems will be implemented.

COMS3163 Web Programming

This course expands on the concept of CGI programming introduced in COMS2163. Topics include features of web forms and CGI processing via a scripting language. Basic database interaction and Server-Side Includes (SSI), client-side implementation of pop-up windows, form validation, cookies, security, and other concepts will also be discussed.

COMS3213 Advanced Data Structures and Algorithm Design

Prerequisites: COMS2213 and MATH2703. This course is a continuation of COMS2213. Concepts, implementation, and application of Btrees, AVL trees, hashing, graphs, and other abstract data structures will be studied.

COMS3333 Implementation of e-Commerce

This course covers technical issues involved in developing online stores. The primary emphasis of this course will be the design, implementation, and configuration of the "shopping carts" used for online business. Particular attention will be paid to areas of security, privacy, and protection.

COMS3503 Visual Programming

Prerequisite: COMS2003 (or equivalent) and COMS2213. This course covers the design and development of event-driven programs using an object-oriented visual programming language such as Visual Basic.

COMS3603 Principles of Management Science

Prerequisite: MATH4003 or equivalent. Simplex method of linear programming, dual problem and sensitivity analysis, and integer programming. Emphasis is on application of these linear systems with case studies and examples from the areas of finance, marketing, and production. Large problem applications are run on the computer.

COMS3703 Operating Systems

Prerequisite: COMS2213 and 2223. This course explores the fundamental concepts upon which modern operating systems are based. Topics include CPU, memory, file and device management, concurrent processes, protection mechanisms, and distributed systems. Several important algorithms will be implemented by the student.

COMS3803 Computer Applications in Accounting and Business

Prerequisites: COMS2003 or equivalent, ACCT2013, Junior standing. Topics to be covered include intermediate and advanced microcomputer applications in business.

COMS4013 Operations Research

Prerequisite: MATH3153. A general coverage of the field of operations with discussion of the planning and control aspects of an OR study. Concentration of the basic models and analytical techniques of operations research, including mathematical programming and probabilistic models.

COMS4033 Systems Analysis and Design I

Prerequisites: COMS3043 and ACCT2013. Students in this course will apply the concepts, tools, procedures, and techniques involved in the development of information systems. Emphasis is placed on the systems approach to problem-solving, user involvement, the management of quality, project control, and teamwork.

COMS4043 Systems Analysis and Design II

Prerequisite: COMS4033. A continuation of COMS4033, with emphasis on the application of the theory and techniques of the previous course. Students will program, implement, and thoroughly document a complete system.

COMS4053 Information Systems Resource Management

Prerequisite: COMS3803 or COMS3033. A study of the principles and concepts involved in the management of organizational maintenance of all information resources, including hardware, software, and personnel. Includes coverage of departmental functions within computer/information services, as well as legal, ethical, and professional issues, quality management, and the strategic impact of information systems

COMS4103 Organizations of Programming Languages

Prerequisite: COMS2223. This course emphasizes the comparative structures and capabilities of several programming languages. Major emphasis will be placed on language constructs and the run-time behavior of programs.

COMS4203 Database Concepts

Corequisite: COMS3043. Problems associated with common data processing systems, reasons for database system development; objectives such as data, device, user, and program independence; hierarchical, network, and relational models; data structures supporting database systems; operational considerations such as performance, integrity, security, concurrency, and reorganization; characteristics of existing database systems.

COMS4253 Computer Graphics

Prerequisites: COMS2203 and MATH4003 or consent of instructor. Developing algorithms to do line drawing, two and three dimensional displays, clipping and windowing, and hidden line removal. Other areas will include graphic I/O devices, display processors, and data structures for graphics.

COMS4303 Client/Server Systems

Prerequisite: COMS3503 and COMS4203. This course provides in-depth coverage of client/server concepts. The student will use object-oriented visual programming tools and SQL in the construction of client/server programs. Emphasis will be placed on the proper design of server databases and on programming techniques used in event-driven environments.

COMS4353 Artificial Intelligence

Prerequisite: COMS2213 and junior standing. General concepts, wide overview of AI history, and development and future of AI. Implementation of AI techniques using the LISP and or PROLOG languages. Additional topics include pattern recognition. natural language processing, learning process, and robotics.

COMS4403 Compiler Design

Prerequisite: COMS2223 and COMS4103. This course covers syntax translation, grammars and parsing, symbol tables, data representation, translating control structures, translating procedures and functions, processing expressions and data structures, and multipass translation. Students will design a computer language and implement the compiler.

COMS4603 System Programming

Prerequisite: COMS3703 or 4903. This course is intended to give the student practical experience in the implementation, modification, and maintenance of system software.

COMS4703 Data Communications and Networks

Prerequisite: COMS2223. Basic elements and functional aspects of the hardware and software required to establish and control data communications in a stand-alone or network environment. Topics include communication protocols, media, network topologies, and system support software.

COMS4803 System Simulation

Prerequisites: Threehour programming course and junior/senior classification. An introduction to simulation methodology as it applies to the analysis and synthesis of systems. Design of simulation experiments and the analysis of data generated therefrom. Random sampling of the Monte Carlo method are used to develop computer procedures for simulated sampling. A broad range of applications is discussed.

COMS4903 Systems Software and Architecture

Prerequisite: COMS2223. This course covers the implementation of production operating systems along with the fundamentals of digital logic and machine architecture.

COMS49813 Seminar in Computer Science

A directed seminar in an area of computer science. Seminars will focus on topics relating to emerging technologies which are beyond the scope of other computer science courses. This course may be repeated for credit if course content differs.

COMS49914 Special Problems in Computer Science

This course will allow the student to work individually or as part of a small team to study and design practical computerized systems to solve problems of particular interest to the student(s). This course may be used to offer a variety of computer science related course work to strengthen the student's knowledge in areas not covered in other course offerings.

Criminal Justice

CJ (SOC)2003 Introduction to Criminal Justice

An overview of the criminal justice system and the workings of each component. Topics include the history, structure, and functions of law enforcement, judicial and correctional organizations, their interrelationship and effectiveness, and the future trends in each.

CJ2013 Introduction to Security

An introduction to and analysis of the private security section and its relationship to the criminal justice system. Topics will include the historical development of security, its functions, limitations and concepts, technology and applications to the present and the future.

CJ(POLS)3023 Judicial Process

The structure and operations of the state and national court systems. Emphasis is upon the role of the criminal courts in the political system and the consequences of judicial policy making.

CJ(PSY)3033 The Criminal Mind

Prerequisite: PSY2003 and CJ2003 or SOC3043 or consent. The course familiarizes students with various models, theories, and research regarding criminality from a psychological perspective. Genetic, constitutional, and biological factors will be emphasized and some practical applications to dealing with criminals will be considered.

CJ(SOC)3043 Crime and Delinquency

Prerequisite: SOC1003 or CJ2003. A study of the major areas of crime and delinquency; theories of crime, the nature of criminal behavior and the components of the criminal justice system. Topics include: crime statistics, criminology research, theories of crime and delinquency, criminal typologies and operations of the criminal justice system.

CJ(RS)3063 Probation and Parole

Prerequisite: CJ2003 or SOC/CJ3043. A survey of the philosophy, origin, development, rise and evaluation of probation and parole as correctional techniques.

CJ(SOC)3103 The Juvenile Justice System

Prerequisite: CJ(SOC)2003 or permission of instructor. An in-depth look at the juvenile justice system including the structure, statuses and roles as well as current issues, problems, and trends.

CJ(SOC)3153 Prison and Corrections

An introduction to and analysis of contemporary American corrections. Emphasis will be on current and past correctional philosophy, traditional and modern correctional facilities, correctional personnel and offenders, new approaches in corrections, and the relationship of corrections to the criminal justice field.

CJ(SOC)3206 The Law in Action

Prerequisite: SOC/CJ3043 and permission. Offered only in the summer. An examination of sociological theories of law and main currents of legal philosophy is followed by participant observation of actual community legal agencies, including police, courts, and others as available. Requires insurance fee.

CJ4023 Law and the Legal System

A comprehensive study of judicial process and behavior in criminal and civil law. May not be taken for credit after completion of POLS 5023 or equivalent.

CJ4053 Criminal Law and the Constitution

A survey of the procedures and issues associated with American criminal justice as viewed from a Constitutional perspective.

CJ(POLS)4063 American Constitutional Law 1941-Present: Civil Liberties and Civil Rights

A comprehensive study of the United States Supreme Court's decisions on civil liberties and civil rights from 1941 to the present. Emphasis will be on the constitutional questions raised in these court cases and their impact on the fundamental freedoms of the Fourteenth Amendment and Bill of Rights.

CJ49914 Special Problems in Criminal Justice

Prerequisite: Prior approval of instructor and department. Content is to be determined by facultystudent conference and based on student background and interest.

Driver Education

DE4543 Driver and Traffic Education II

Prerequisites: A valid driver's license, admission to teacher education program, a driving record free from frequent and unusual violations. This course is designed to prepare teachers to organize and teach driver education and traffic safety programs in secondary schools. It includes administration, supervision of personnel, design of facilities, and a research project. May not be repeated for credit as DE 5543 or equivalent.

DE4613 Driver and Traffic Education I

Prerequisites: A valid driver's license, admission to teacher education program, and a driving record free from frequent and unusual violations. This course is designed to prepare teachers to organize and teach driver education and traffic safety programs in secondary schools. This course provides a survey of materials and methods of instruction plus evaluation of textbooks and incar training of a student driver. Two hour lecture, two hours laboratory. May not be repeated for credit as DE 5613 or equivalent.

Early Childhood Education

Associate Degree Program

ECE2112 Basic Child Growth and Development I

Prerequisite: Score of 75 or above on the writing portion of the COMPASS or 19 or above on the English portion of the ACTE. A study of the developmental principles of the developmental stages of the child from birth to age eight. Involves both observation and lecture.

ECE2212 Basic Child Growth and Development II

Prerequisite: Completion of ECE2112. A study of the developmental principles of the developmental stages of the children from age nine to eighteen. Involves both observation and lecture.

ECE2312 Foundations and Theories in Early Childhood Education

Prerequisite: Score of 75 or above on the writing portion of the COMPASS or 19 or above on the English portion of the ACTE. An introduction to the profession including historical and social foundations, awareness of value issues, ethical and legal issues, staff relations, and the importance of becoming an advocate for children and families.

ECE2513 Curriculum for Early Childhood Education

Corequisites: ECE2112 and ECE2312. A study and application in the field of the theoretical base for early learning. Covers curriculum for young children based on research and theory.

ECE2613 Methods and Materials Using Developmentally Appropriate Practices and Activities for Young Children

Prerequisites: Completion of ECE2112 and 2312. A combination of classroom and fieldbased experiences stressing developmentally appropriate techniques and materials fostering successful development and learning in young children.

ECE2991-9 Practicum in Early Childhood Education

Prerequisites: Completion of 12 hours of ECE courses taken for meeting assessment requirements for the Child Development Associate credential. Variable credit available for documented early childhood training related to the principles and procedures which support the development and operation of an effective early childhood education program. Credit may also be awarded for portfolio development for the Child Development Associate assessment. Equivalencies for awarding credit will be determined by the advisor in accordance with guidelines of the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC). Additional coursework approved by the advisor may be applied toward any balance of credit needed to complete the nine hours.

Early Childhood Education

Bachelor Degree Program

ECED2001 Introduction to Early Childhood Education

Must be taken concurrently with ECED2002. This course studies the social, historical, and philosophical foundations in American Education. Basic technology skills including the portfolio will be introduced.

ECED2002 Field-Based Experience Seminar in Early Childhood

Must be taken concurrently with ECED2001. This course provides an opportunity for prospective education majors to participate in guided classroom observation with time for reflection and discussion.

ECED3013 Technology in the Early Childhood Classroom

An instructional technology course for preservice teachers introducing students to the incorporation of technology into instructional situations. Students will become familiar with classroom computer utilization for instructional and classroom management technology; state and national standards for technology and curriculum areas and create lessons centered upon those standards.

ECED3023 Foundations of Early Childhood Education

Must be taken concurrently with ECED3033. An introduction to the field of early childhood education, including a history of the movement, influencing concepts and theories, and relevant issues.

ECED3033 Child Development

Must be taken concurrently with ECED3023. A study of the physical, cognitive, and psychosocial development of the individual beginning with the prenatal period and continuing through early adolescence. This course includes an on-site field experience in settings for young children.

ECED3043 Developmentally Appropriate Practice

Prerequisite: ECED3023 and ECED3033 and admission to Phase II. Corequisite: ECED3053. A study of developmentally appropriate practice for young children, birth through age 9. This exploration is an integrated curricular study of appropriate early childhood curriculum, materials, environments, assessments, expectations, instructional strategies, and considerations for early childhood educators. Appropriate field observations and experiences are an integral part of this course, and will be integrated with course content.

ECED3053 Children and Families in a Diverse Society

Prerequisite: ECED3023 and ECED3033 and admission to Phase II. Corequisite: ECED3043. A study of the characteristics of young children with developmental disabilities in the contexts of family theory and intervention. Particular emphasis will be placed on how these characteristics impact the child's family and educational needs.

ECED3113 Integrated Curriculum I (3-5 years)

Prerequisites: ECED3043 and ECED3053. Corequisites: ECED3122. ECED3162, ECED3172, ECED3183, ECED3192. In this course, pre-service teachers build a working knowledge of curriculum strategies and techniques on which to base wise curriculum decision making for children ages 3-5. This course is connected to the ECED3122 Practicum.

ECED3122 Practicum I

Prerequisite: ECED3043 and ECED3053. Corequisites: ECED3113, ECED3162, ECED3172, ECED3183, ECED3192. Practicum I is designed to provide pre-service teachers with field-based experiences for children age 3-5 years.

ECED3162 Diagnosis and Assessment of Young Children I (3-5 years)

Prerequisite: ECED3043 and ECED3053. Corequisite: ECED3113, ECED3122, ECED3172, ECED3183, ECED3192. A study of observational and developmentally appropriate tools and methods of collecting data for decision making. Emphasis is on qualitative assessment techniques that are specific to 3-5 year-old children. This course is connected to the ECED3122 Practicum.

ECED3172 Guiding Young Children I (3-5 years)

Prerequisite: ECED3043 and ECED3053. Corequisites: ECED3113, ECED3122, ECED3162, ECED3183, ECED3192. Emphasis is placed on the guidance and management, individually and in groups, of young children ages 3-5 years. The course focuses on developmentally appropriate practices in early childhood settings. Creation of learning environments that foster social competence, build self-esteem in young children, and assist them in the exploration of ways to independently solve problems and gain self-control are emphasized. This course is connected to the ECED3122 Practicum.

ECED3183 Language and Literacy I (3-5 years)

Prerequisite: ECED3043 and ECED3053. Corequisites: ECED3113, ECED3122, ECED3162, ECED3172, ECED3192. A study of teaching strategies and support systems for encouraging the various areas of literacy in the 3-5 year-old child. This course is connected to the ECED3122 Practicum.

ECED3192 Children's Literature I (3-5 years)

Prerequisite: ECED3043 and ECED3053. Corequisites: ECED3113, ECED3122, ECED3162, ECED3172, ECED3183. Study of sources and types of reading materials available for 3-5 year old children and ways to use them to enhance learning. This course is connected to the ECED3122 Practicum.

ECED3213 Integrated Curriculum II (6-9 years)

Prerequisite: ECED3113. Corequisites: ECED3222, ECED3262, ECED3272, ECED3283, ECED3292. ECED3213 builds on the concepts presented in ECED3113 and emphasizes developmentally appropriate curriculum for children ages 6-9; mandated curriculum; and contemporary issues related to curriculum. This course is connected to the ECED3222 Practicum.

ECED3222 Practicum II

Prerequisite: ECED3122. Corequisites: ECED3213, ECED3262, ECED3272, ECED3283, ECED3292. Practicum II is designed to provide pre-service teachers with field-based experiences for children age 6-9 years.

ECED3262 Diagnosis and Assessment of Young Children II (6-9 years)

Prerequisite: ECED3162. Corequisite: ECED3213, ECED3222, ECED3272, ECED3283, ECED3292. A study of fundamental observation, assessment, and evaluation concepts and tools. Emphasis on both qualitative and quantitative methods of measuring and reporting student progress and learning. Designed to give the beginning teacher a background in the collection and interpretation of data with the goal of making valid data-driven decisions. This course is connected to the ECED3222 Practicum.

ECED3272 Guiding Young Children II (6-9 years)

Prerequisite: ECED3172. Corequisites: ECED3213, ECED3222, ECED3262, ECED3283, ECED3292. Emphasis is on the guidance and management, individually and in groups, of primary-aged children, 6-9 years. The course focuses on developmentally appropriate practices in multi-cultural school settings that encourage children to become self-regulated learners. Creation of a context for positive discipline and a guidance approach for an encouraging classroom are explored. This course is connected to the ECED3222 Practicum.

ECED3283 Language and Literacy II (6-9 years)

Prerequisite: ECED3183. Corequisites: ECED3213, ECED3222, ECED3262, ECED3272, ECED3292. A study of teaching strategies and support systems for encouraging the various areas of literacy in the 6-9 year-old child. This course is connected to the ECED3222 Practicum.

ECED3292 Children's Literature II (6-9 years)

Prerequisite: ECED3192. Corequisites: ECED3213, ECED3222, ECED3262, ECED3272, ECED3283. Study of sources and types of reading materials available for 6-9 year old children and ways to use them to enhance learning. This course is connected to the ECED3222 Practicum.

ECED4915 Early Childhood Education Internship

(Fifteen hour course.) An intensive field experience and campus seminar class which culminates the early childhood program. Students will spend time in early childhood environments and in campus seminars applying their knowledge and skills in reflective decision making with children and families.

Economics

ECON2003 Principles of Economics I

Each semester. Macroeconomic analysis of output, income, employment, price level, and business fluctuations, including the monetary system, fiscal and monetary policy, and international economics.

ECON2013 Principles of Economics II

Each semester. Prerequisite: ECON2003. Microeconomic analysis of consumer and producer behavior. Includes theory of production and cost, the effects of market structure on resource allocation, distribution of income, and welfare economics.

(Additional prerequisites for 3000 and 4000level courses are listed in the School of Business section of this catalog.)

ECON3003 Money and Banking

Each semester. Nature, principles and functions of money, macroeconomic theory, development and operation of financial institutions in the American monetary system, with emphasis on processes, problems, and policies of commercial banks in the United States.

ECON3013 Economics of Labor Relations

An overview of U.S. labor sector including demographic trends, labor unions, human capital issues and work-leisure values. A brief review of neo-classical wage theory with critiques. Selected labor sector issues such as global labor developments, public sector employment, migration/mobility and discrimination.

ECON3073 Intermediate Microeconomic Theory

An examination of the theories of consumer behavior and demand. and the theories of production, cost and supply. The determination of product prices and output in various market structures and an analysis of factor pricing.

ECON40013 Readings in Economic Theory

On demand. Prerequisites: Senior standing, background of courses needed for problem undertaken and permission of the department head. Advanced study on an individual basis is offered in money and banking, public finance, general economics, international trade, labor relations, transportation.

ECON4033 Current Economic Problems

Emphasis is on a "way of thinking" about current economic problems including a conceptual context, critical thinking and problem solving approaches. Major domestic and global economic trends are reviewed. Current economic issues are selected for evaluation.

ECON4053 Comparative Economic Systems

Fall. Survey of a conceptual framework for comparing national economies and for studying a global economic system. Review of the current world economic environment and of policy issues at the national and multinational levels.

ECON4073 World Economic Systems

On demand. A study of the institutional framework of an economic system selected by the instructor. The course includes a visit to the country being studied.

ECON4093 International Economics and Finance

A course designed specifically for economics and finance majors desiring an understanding of the interplay of economic and financial forces between nations. While developing the theoretical base underlying these forces, the course will emphasize practical aspects of crossborder flows of goods, services, and capital from the point of view of the firm. Lecture and discussion will be supplemented by analysis of cases and current events where appropriate. The content of the course should be readily applicable to any private or public sector policymaking situation involving an international dimension in which students find themselves.

Educational Foundations

EDFD3023 Human Development

A study of the physical, emotional, mental, and social growth of the individual beginning with the prenatal period and continuing through adulthood.

EDFD3042 Educational Psychology

Prerequisite: Admission to Stage II of the teacher education program and completion or concurrent enrollment in EDFD3023. General principles of learning, the learner's potentialities with attention to individual differences, the environment of effective learning, application of psychology to educational problems. May not be taken for credit after completion of EDFD3043.

EDFD3072 Introduction to Educational Measurements

Prerequisite: Admission to Stage II of the teacher education program and completion or concurrent enrollment in EDFD3023. Characteristics of good school appraisal; principles and procedures in the selection and use of standardized tests; techniques in the construction and use of classroom tests; the interpretation of various types of tests. May not be taken for credit after completion of EDFD3073.

EDFD4052 Teaching Exceptional Learners

Prerequisite: Admission to Stage II of the teacher education program. A study of the major areas of exceptionality including the learning disabled, mentally retarded, physically disabled, and the gifted, and of their special needs in a school program. May not be taken for credit after completion of EDFD4053 or repeated for credit as EDFD 5052 or equivalent.

EDFD4333 Teaching Reading and Study Strategies in the Content Area

Prerequisite: Admission to Stage II of the teacher education program. This course is designed to provide preservice and inserve teachers and administrators with a knowledge of reading factors as they relate to various disciplines. The content of the course includes estimating the student's reading ability, techniques for vocabulary, questioning strategies, and developing readingrelated study skills. May not be repeated for credit as EDFD 5333.

Educational Media

EDMD4033 Introduction to Instructional Technology

A media methods course for teachers providing an introduction to classroom computer utilization; applications of the principles of graphic design, visual literacy, communications and learning theory to the selection, evaluation and use of instructional materials, and a survey of production techniques for teachermade materials. Includes basic production principles, operation of audiovisual equipment, and an introduction to computerassisted instruction and computerized classroom management. May not be repeated for credit as EDMD 5033 or equivalent.

Emergency Administration and Management

EAM1003 Living in a Hazardous Environment

Overview of emergency management systems with an analysis of the causes, characteristics, nature and effects of such disasters as avalanches, drought, earthquakes, epidemics, fires, flooding, hazardous materials, hurricanes, industrial accidents, nuclear power plant accidents, power failures, volcanoes, and other catastrophic hazards. Required for major.

EAM1013 Aim and Scope of Emergency Management

Analysis of disasters in historical settings and current situations. Areas covered include the role of local, state, and federal government, the unique problems of business/industry crisis management, disaster prevention and mitigation policy, technology support, and professionalism and litigation issues. Required for major.

EAM1023 Disaster Planning

Prerequisites or corequisites: EAM1003 and 1013 or consent of instructor. A study of pre-plan requirements, hazards and resource assessments, vulnerability analysis, methodology of planning, and public policy considerations.

EAM2023 Principles and Practice of Disaster Response Operations and Management

Prerequisites or corequisites: EAM1003 and 1013 or consent of instructor. A study of the steps necessary for implementing a disaster plan with consideration given to disaster warning systems, emergency center operations, and public health issues in large-scale disasters, dealing with the press and other communications issues, and utilizing local, state, and federal interfaces.

EAM2033 Citizen/Family/Community Disaster Preparedness Education

Prerequisites or corequisites: EAM1003 and 1013 or consent of instructor. The course covers the need for citizen disaster preparedness; research findings on the subject; program design models; team and coalition building, materials and approaches, effective presentation skills, overcoming disaster denial and apathy; preparedness with children, the elderly, and other high-risk populations.

EAM2043 The Economics of Disaster

Prerequisites or corequisites: EAM1003 and 1013 or consent of instructor. The course concentrates on the implications of disaster on state, regional, national, and international economies; case studies in false economies; economics of disaster modeling; and current issues in federal economic disaster policy.

EAM3003 Developing Emergency Management Skills

Prerequisites or corequisites: EAM1003 and 1013 or consent of instructor. Topics covered in this course include: program planning and management, financial planning and management, managing information, managing people and time, personality types, leadership styles, followership styles, decision-making skills, team-building skills and group dynamics; community-building skills, intergovernmental relationships, negotiating skills, communications skills, emergency management ethics, and professionalism.

EAM3013 Public Administration and Emergency Management

Prerequisites or corequisites: EAM1003 and 1013 or consent of instructor. The course will analyze the role of public policy in relation to disaster planning issues, financial impact of disasters, disaster mitigation issues, land use planning, disaster recovery issue, legal and liability issues, management of large-scale disaster response/recovery, and disaster legislation.

EAM3033 The Social Dimension of Disaster

Prerequisites or corequisites: EAM1003 and 1013 or consent of instructor. Overview of empirical vs. theoretical approaches; human behavior in disaster, myths and reality; group disaster behavior; community social systems and disaster; cultures, demographics and disaster behavior distinctions, and model-building in sociological disaster research.

EAM3043 The Politics of Disaster

Prerequisites or corequisites: EAM1003 and 1013 or consent of instructor. The course presents concepts and basic descriptive information about the political system within context of disaster policy including an overview of the executive and legislative political issues including the Federal Emergency Management Agency's organization and types of personnel.

EAM4003 Principles and Practice of Disaster Relief and Recovery

Prerequisites or corequisites: EAM1003 and 1013 or consent of instructor. Recovery issues are studied and how they relate to ethical, medical, and economic and environmental considerations; initial, short-term, and long-term recovery efforts and group exercises; and documentation and record-keeping.

EAM4013 Business and Industry Emergency Management

Prerequisites or corequisites: EAM1003 and 1013 or consent of instructor. The course provides an analysis of the players involved; conjunction with governmental emergency management; legal requirements; employee disaster awareness and preparedness; disaster mitigation and response; business resumption considerations and public policy considerations and community outreach.

EAM4023 Information Technology and Emergency Management

Prerequisites or corequisites: EAM1003 and 1013 or consent of instructor. The course emphasizes the utilization of computer EM applications literacy, information requirements, acquisition, analysis, modeling, and data base management; decision support systems and computer EM software; networking; telecommunications; remote sensing technologies, and other emerging technologies related to EM applications.

EAM4033 Emergency Management Research Methods/Analysis

Prerequisites: MATH2163 or BUAD2053 or SOC2053; corequisites: EAM1003 and 1013 or consent of instructor. The course covers the basic research methodology and statistical analysis required for managing a research/data base to be utilized for decision-making and policy development. Required for major.

EAM4043 Disaster and Emergency Management Ethics

Prerequisites or corequisites: EAM1003 and 1013 or consent of instructor. The course will involve a study of a variety types of ethical theory (teleological, deontological, distributive theories of justice, natural law), a review of specific ethical dilemmas per disaster phase, professional ethics, overcoming biases, avoiding discrimination, and developing sensitivity. Detailed ethical case studies will be conducted (Bhopal, Chernobyl, Three-Mile Island, Love Canal, Exxon Valdez).

EAM4053 Community Management of Hazardous Materials

Prerequisites or corequisites: EAM1003 and 1013 or consent of instructor. The course addresses chemical properties of hazardous materials and wastes; legal requirements for their handling, storage, transportation, and disposal; and methods for protecting employees, facilities, and the community.

EAM4106 Practicum/internship

Prerequisites or corequisites: EAM1003 and 1013 or consent of instructor. Students will enroll in this course and pay the regular tuition and fees in order to obtain credit on their transcripts toward degree requirements. A portfolio will be required to document competencies attained. A minimum of 400 hours of relevant work experience must be completed in an approved internship site. The student will work with an advisor to have a site approved at least one semester in advance.

EAM4201-15 Externship

Prerequisites or corequisites: EAM1003 and 1013 or consent of instructor. Credit for experience and training will be awarded according to guidelines and competencies established by International Association of Emergency Managers and the Emergency Management Institute in conjunction with the American Council on Education's National Guide to Educational Credit for Training Programs. Students will enroll in this course, pay the regular tuition and fees, and complete and submit an assessment portfolio documenting experience and training in order to obtain credit on their transcripts toward degree requirements. Students may substitute 3000 or 4000 level technical specialty courses, core courses, or equivalent substitutions as recommended by the advisor and approved by the dean in lieu of having relevant training or certification.

EAM4991-3 Special Problems and Topics

Prerequisites or corequisites: EAM1003 and 1013 or consent of instructor. The topics will vary to reflect the continual changes in the emergency management field. This course may also serve as an independent study course upon recommendation of the advisor and approval by the dean.

Engineering

ENGR1002 Engineering Graphics

Corequisite: MATH1113. General course in the most important types of engineering drawings. A foundation course in lettering, geometrical exercises, orthographic projections, including auxiliary views, sections, pictorial representation. The computer is introduced as a drafting tool. Lecture and laboratory four hours.

ENGR1012 Introduction to Engineering

Prerequisites: high school trigonometry and ACT Math score of 24 or above, or MATH1113, 1203. An introductory course to acquaint students with the technical and social aspects of engineering, the analytic approach to problem solving, measurements and calculations, including application of computer techniques. Lecture one hour, laboratory two hours.

ENGR2013 Statics

Corequisites: MATH2934 and PHYS2114. Principles of statics, resultants, equilibrium, and analysis of force systems. Structure analysis, forces in space, friction, centroids, and moments of inertia. Lecture three hours.

ENGR2023 Engineering Materials

Prerequisite: CHEM2124. A study of the mechanical and physical properties, microstructure, and the various testings of engineering materials (metals, plastics, woods, and concrete) from the viewpoint of manufacture and construction. Lecture three hours.

ENGR2033 Dynamics

Prerequisites: ENGR2013. Corequisite: MATH3243. A continuation of ENGR2013. Study of problems of unbalanced force systems. Kinematics and kinetics of rigid bodies. Work and energy, impulse and momentum. Lecture three hours.

ENGR2103 Electric Circuits I

Corequisite: PHYS2124 and MATH3243; prerequisite: MATH2924. An introduction to network theory and electrical devices. Topics include resistive circuits, dependent sources, analysis methods, network theorems, RC and RL circuits, and second order circuits. Lecture three hours.

ENGR2111 Electric Circuits Laboratory

Corequisite: ENGR2113. Report writing; use of basic electrical measurement devices; voltmeters, ammeters, R meters, wattmeters, and oscilloscopes. Computer modeling and data analysis of AC and DC circuits. Emphasis on developing laboratory techniques through experiments paralleling topics in ENGR2103 and ENGR2113. Laboratory three hours per week.

ENGR2113 Electric Circuits II

Prerequisite: ENGR2103. A continuation of ENGR2103 covering phasor analysis, steady state power, complex network functions, frequency response, transformers, Laplace methods. Lecture three hours.

ENGR2134 Digital Logic Design

Prerequisite: ENGR1012 and COMS2103. Binary numbers and codes, Boolean algebra, combinational and sequential logic, minimization techniques, memory systems, register transfers, control logic design, introduction to microcomputers. Lecture and laboratory four hours.

ENGR3003 Engineering Modeling and Design

Prerequisites: COMS2803 and MATH3243. Corequisite: ENGR3013. Formulation of engineering design objectives; reduction of engineering systems to mathematical models; methods of analysis using computers; interpretation of numerical results; optimization of design variables. Emphasis is placed upon practical design experience. Examples are drawn from various engineering disciplines. Lecture three hours.

ENGR3013 Mechanics of Materials

Prerequisite: ENGR2013. Fundamental stress and strain relationships, torsion, shear and bending moments, stresses and deflections in beams; introduction to statically indeterminate beams, columns, combined stresses, and safety factors. Lecture three hours.

ENGR3023 Manufacturing Processes

Prerequisites or corequisites: ENGR2023 and ENGR3013. Morphological aspects of manufacturing processes, testing of engineering metals, metal working processes, metal forming processes, machining, non-destructive inspection methods, statistical process control, control charts, and total quality management concepts.

ENGR3103 (PHYS3143) Electronics I

Prerequisite: ENGR2113. Physics and electrical characteristics of diodes, bipolar transistors, and field effect transistors, behavior of these devices as circuit elements; common electronic circuits in discrete and integrated form; digital circuits including standard IC gates and flipflops, linear circuits including standard discrete and integrated amplifier configurations and their characteristics. Lecture three hours.

ENGR3123 Signals and Systems

Prerequisites: MATH3243, ENGR2113. Signal and system modeling, time and frequency domain analysis, singularity functions, the Dirac Delta function, impulse response, the superposition integral and convolution, Fourier series and Fourier and Laplace transformations. Lecture three hours.

ENGR3131 Electronics Laboratory

Prerequisite: ENGR2111. Corequisite: ENGR3103. Experiments paralleling ENGR3103 emphasizing the applications and limitations of discrete electronic devices. Circuit modeling using "SPICE" and Electronic Workbench, applications of integrated circuits. Laboratory three hours per week.

ENGR3133 Microprocessor Systems Design

Corequisite ENGR3103; prerequisites: ENGR2134, ENGR2103 or consent. Digital design using microprocessors. Microcomputer architecture, memory structures, I/O interfaces, addressing models, interrupts, assembler programming, development tools. This course should also attract computer science students interested in hardware. Lecture three hours.

ENGR3143 Electromagnetics

Corequisite: ENGR3123. An introduction to static and dynamic electromagnetic fields using vector methods. Transmission lines, electrostatic fields, magnetostatic fields, Maxwell's equations, plane electromagnetic wave propagation, reflection, refraction, attenuation, long wire antennas, the short dipole, reciprocity, and gain. Lecture three hours.

ENGR3151 Electrical Machines Laboratory

Prerequisite: ENGR2111. Corequisite: ENGR3153. This course parallels ENGR3153 with experiments in single and polyphase transformers, direct current machines, synchronous machines and induction machines. Laboratory three hours per week.

ENGR3153 Electrical Machines

Prerequisite: ENGR2113. Steadystate analysis of single phase and polyphase transformers, direct current machines, synchronous machines, induction machines, and special purpose machines. Special emphasis will be given to the modeling and control of these machines. Lecture three hours.

ENGR3163 Electric Power Systems

Prerequisite: ENGR2113. Introduction to industrial and utilities electric power systems, poly-phase systems, fault conditions, per-unit values, and the method of symmetrical components.

ENGR3223 Microcontrollers

Prerequisites: ENGR2134, 2103. Corequisite: ENGR3103. Digital design using microcontrollers. Microchip architecture, memory structures, I/O interfaces, addressing modes, interrupts, assembly language programming, development tools.

ENGR3313 Thermodynamics I

Prerequisites: MATH2924 and PHYS2114. An introduction to thermodynamics, including thermodynamic properties of pure substances, heat and work, the first and second laws of thermodynamics, and entropy with applications to power and refrigeration cycles. Lecture three hours.

ENGR3403 Machine Dynamics and Vibrations

Prerequisite: ENGR2033 and MATH3243. The study of the relative motion of machine components, force systems applied to these components, the motions resulting from these forces, and their effect on machine design criteria. Lecture 3 hours.

ENGR3413 Fundamentals of Mechanical Design

Prerequisites: ENGR2033 and 3013. Analysis of machines and components through application of basic fundamentals and principles. Lecture three hours.

ENGR3442 Mechanical Laboratory I

Prerequisites: ENGR2023. Corequisite: ENGR3013. A study of the basic materials testing procedures and instrumentation. Emphasis will be placed on proper laboratory techniques including data collection, data reduction, and report preparation. Lecture one hour, laboratory three hours.

ENGR3503 Basic Nuclear Engineering

Prerequisites: MATH2924, CHEM2124, and Corequisite PHYS2114. An introduction to atomic and nuclear processes and to nuclear science and engineering fundamentals, including the nature of nuclear radiation, the nuclear chain reaction, criticality, power reactor types, and applications of nuclear technology. Lecture three hours.

ENGR3512 Radiation Detection Laboratory

Prerequisite: MATH2914 and CHEM2124 or consent. A study of each of the common kinds of nuclear radiation, including the detection and analysis methods and applications to nondestructive assays. Use of computers in analyses. Lecture one hour, laboratory three hours.

ENGR3523 (PHYS3033) Radiation Health Physics

Upon demand. Prerequisites: MATH2914, CHEM2124, or consent. A study of the protection of individuals and population groups against the harmful effects of ionizing radiation. Included in the study is: (1) radiation detection and measurement, (2) relationships between exposure and biological damage, (3) radiation and the environment, (4) design criteria for processes, equipment, and facilities so that radiation exposure is minimized, and (5) environmental impact of nuclear power plants. Lecture three hours per week.

ENGR4103 Electronics II

Prerequisite: ENGR3103. A continuation of ENGR3103 specializing in characteristics and applications of both linear and digital integrated circuits; amplifiers, feedback analysis, frequency response, oscillators, amplifier stabilization, microprocessors, memory systems, emphasis on design. Lecture three hours.

ENGR4111 Digital Systems Laboratory

Prerequisite: ENGR3131. Corequisite: ENGR3133 or ENGR3223. This laboratory addresses hardware implementation of systems studied in ENGR2134 and ENGR3133/3223. Digital circuits are designed and constructed using microprocessors, programmable logic devices, and other digital integrated circuits. Focus is on microprocessor hardware and interfacing. Laboratory three hours.

ENGR4113 Digital Signal Processing

Prerequisites: ENGR3123 and 3133 or ENGR3223. The study of discrete-time signals and systems, convolution, correlation, z-transform, discrete-time Fourier transform, analysis and design of digital filters. Students write software for real-time implementation of selected signal processing algorithms using DSP microcomputer hardware. Lecture three hours.

ENGR4133 Application-Specific Integrated Circuit Design

Prerequisites: ENGR3103, ENGR3133 or 3223. A project oriented course in which students develop and test custom digital integrated circuits (IC's). An overview of IC design systems and manufacturing processes is presented. Economics of IC production are discussed. Hardware Description Languages (HDL's) are studied. Students design and implement custom IC's using schematic-based entry and HDL's. Lecture one hour per week, project work two hours per week.

ENGR4143 Communication Systems I

Prerequisites: ENGR3123, MATH3153. An introduction to design and analysis of analog and digital communication systems. Amplitude and angle modulation and demodulation, bandwidth, frequency division multiplexing, sampling and pulse-code modulation, detection error statistics in digital communication. Lecture three hours.

ENGR4153 Communication Systems II

Prerequisite: ENGR4143. Continuation of ENGR4143. Design and analysis of analog and digital communication systems, taking into account the effects of noise. Random variables, random processes, analog and digital communication systems in the presence of noise. Optimum signal detection, channel capacity, error detecting and correcting codes. Lecture three hours.

ENGR4163 Acoustics

Prerequisite: MATH3243. An introduction to the fundamental principles governing generation, propagation, reflection, and transmission of sound waves in fluids. The student will be exposed to a broad field of acoustic topics including: auditorium and musical acoustics; principles of loudspeakers, microphones, arrays and directivity; environmental noise standards and regulations; noise abatement, passive and active control. Completion includes a design project and written report. Lecture 3 hours.

ENGR4193 Electrical Design Project

Prerequisites: ENGR3003, 4103, 4202, senior standing and consent of instructor. An independent or group project in electrical engineering design. Where appropriate, a team approach will be employed. Emphasis will be placed on designing an electrical system or subsystem with due regard for: safety, environmental concerns, reliability, longevity, ease of manufacturing, maintainability, and cost effectiveness. A written and oral report are required.

ENGR4202 Engineering Design

Prerequisite: Senior standing or consent of instructor. Corequisite: ENGR3413 or ENGR4103. This course serves as the first part of a two course sequence in which the student completes a senior design project. Design methodologies and tools including real world design considerations such as environmental impact, engineering ethics, economics, safety, product costing and liability are introduced. Design for manufacture, project management, scheduling and proposal writing will be covered. Successful completion of this course shall require completion of a proposal for a senior design project being accepted by the faculty design project review process.

ENGR4303 Control Systems

Prerequisites: ENGR3003 and ENGR2113. The course will consist of the formulation of a variety of electrical, mechanical, thermal, and hydraulic control systems. Systems will be designed for particular steady state and transient responses. The Laplace Transform and Routh's stability criterion will be developed as design tools. In addition the course will acquaint the student with the following design tools: block diagrams, transfer functions, servo classifications, root locus techniques, the Nyquist criterion, compensation techniques. Lecture three hours.

ENGR4314 Modern Control Systems

Prerequisites: ENGR3003, ENGR3123. The course will consist of the formulation of a variety of electrical and mechanical control systems. Systems will be designed for particular steady state and transient responses. The Laplace transform and Routh's stability criterion will be used as design tools. Both continuous and digital design techniques will be considered. State space methods, nonlinear methods, and modern control techniques (fuzzy, sliding, mode, etc.) will be included to verify theoretical results. Lecture three hours, lab two hours.

ENGR4323 Power Plant Systems

Prerequisites: ENGR3313, 4403 or consent. A study of the design and operation of steamelectric power plant components and systems. Fossil and renewable energy plants are emphasized. Lecture three hours.

ENGR4403 Mechanics of Fluids and Hydraulics

Prerequisites: ENGR2033 and ENGR3313. A study of statics and dynamics of incompressible fluids. Major topics include the basic fluid flow concepts of continuity, energy and momentum, dimensional analysis, viscosity, laminar and turbulent flows, and flow in pipes. Lecture three hours.

ENGR4413 Finite Element Analysis

Prerequisites: ENGR2103, 3003, 3013. Introduction to approximate methods using finite elements. Development of the finite element method using variational formulations. Applications include machine design, mechanical vibrations, heat transfer, fluid flow and electromagnetics.

ENGR4423 Machine Component Design

Prerequisite: ENGR3413. Design and analysis of specific machine components including gears, clutches, springs, and bearings. Lecture three hours.

ENGR4433 Thermodynamics II

Prerequisites: MATH2934, 3243 and ENGR3313. A continuation of ENGR3313. The study of thermodynamics is extended to the investigation of relations for simple substances, non-reacting mixtures, reacting mixtures, chemical reactions and a study of availability analysis. Power and refrigeration cycles are studied in more depth. Lecture three hours.

ENGR4442 Mechanical Laboratory II

Prerequisites: ENGR3442, ENGR4403. Corequisite: ENGR4443. A study of fluid mechanics, thermodynamics, and heat transfer experimentation techniques. Laboratory projects will be assigned with student responsibility for procedure development and test program implementation. Formal laboratory reports will be required. Lecture one hour, laboratory three hours.

ENGR4443 Heat Transfer

Prerequisites: ENGR3313 and ENGR4403 or consent. Basic thermal energy transport processes, conduction, convection, and radiation, and the mathematical analysis of systems involving these processes in steadystate and timedependent cases. Lecture three hours.

ENGR4463 Heating, Ventilating, and Air-Conditioning Design

Prerequisites: ENGR3313, ENGR4443, or permission of instructor. A study of the principles of human thermal comfort including applied psychometrics and air-conditioning processes. Fundamentals of analysis of heating and cooling loads and design of HVAC systems. Lecture 3 hours.

ENGR4493 Mechanical Design Project

Prerequisite: ENGR3003, 4202, senior standing and consent of instructor. Corequisite ENGR4423. An independent or group project in mechanical engineering design. Where appropriate, a team approach will be employed. Emphasis will be placed on designing a mechanical system or subsystem with due regard for: safety, environmental concerns, reliability, longevity, ease of manufacturing, maintainability, and cost effectiveness. Both a written and oral report are required.

ENGR49914 Special Problems in Engineering

Prerequisite: Minimum of three hours at the junior level in area of study. Individual study in advanced area of the student's choice under the direction of a faculty advisor.

ENGR4503 Nuclear Power Plants I

Prerequisites: ENGR3503, ENGR4403. A study of the various types of nuclear reactor plants including the methods used for energy conservation. Relative advantages/disadvantages of various plant types investigated. Lecture three hours.

English

ENGL 0203 English as a Second Language

A course in basic English grammar, composition, reading, aural comprehension, and oral communication designed to prepare speakers of English as a second language for the sixhour, collegelevel composition sequence. The grade in this course will be computed in semester and cumulative grade point averages, but the course may not be used to satisfy general education requirements nor provide credit toward any degree. Students who are placed in ENGL 0203 must earn a grade of "C" or better in the course before enrolling in ENGL1013. A student who makes a "D" or "F" in ENGL 0203 must repeat the course in each subsequent semester until he or she earns a grade of "C" or better.

ENGL 0303 Foundational Composition

A course in basic grammar and writing to prepare students for the required sixhour compositional sequence. The grade in the course will be computed in semester and cumulative grade point averages, but the course may not be used to satisfy general education requirements nor provide credit toward any degree. A student who is placed in ENGL 0303 must earn a grade of "C" or better in the course before enrolling in ENGL1013. A student who makes a "D" or "F" in ENGL 0303 must repeat the course in each subsequent semester until he or she earns a grade of "C" or better.

ENGL1013 Composition I

Prerequisite: Score of 19 or above on English section of the Enhanced ACT, 40 or above on the TSWE, 75 or above on the COMPASS writing section, or a grade of "C" or better in ENGL 0203 or 0303. A review of grammar, introduction to research methods, and practice in writing exposition using reading to provide ideas and patterns. May not be taken for credit after successful completion of ENGL1043.

ENGL1023 Composition II

Prerequisite: Minimum grade of "C" in ENGL1013 or 1043. A continuation of ENGL1013 with readings in poetry, fiction, and drama. May not be taken for credit after successful completion of ENGL1053.

ENGL1043 Honors Composition I

Prerequisite: Admission to the Tech Honors Program or permission of the Honors Program Director. An honors course that concentrates on advanced reading and writing skills. May not be taken for credit after successful completion of ENGL1013.

ENGL1053 Honors Composition II

Prerequisite: Successful completion of ENGL1013 or ENGL1043 and admission to the Tech Honors Program or permission of the Honors Program Director. An honors writing course that includes the study of poetry, fiction, and drama. May not be taken for credit after successful completion of ENGL1023.

NOTE: A grade of "C" or better must be earned in each of the two composition courses used to satisfy the general education requirement of English/Communication.

ENGL2003 Introduction to World Literature

Prerequisite: ENGL1013 or equivalent. An exploration of significant authors and themes in world literature. ENGL2003 may be used to fulfill the general education humanities requirements.

ENGL2013 Introduction to American Literature

Prerequisite: ENGL1013 or equivalent. An exploration of significant authors and themes in American literature. ENGL2013 may be used to fulfill the general education humanities requirement.

ENGL2043 Introduction to Creative Writing

Prerequisite: ENGL1023 or equivalent. Introduction to techniques of writing both fiction and poetry.

ENGL2053 Technical Communication

Prerequisite: ENGL1023 or equivalent. Practice in composing abstracts, instructions, visuals, proposals, questionnaires, letters, memos, and a variety of informal and formal reports.

ENGL (JOUR)2173 Introduction to Film

Prerequisite ENGL1013 or equivalent. A study of film as an art form with particular attention given to genres, stylistic technique and film's relation to popular culture. ENGL2173 may be used to fulfill the General Education fine arts requirement. ENGL2173 may not be repeated for credit after the completion of JOUR2173.

ENGL2183 Film as Literature

Prerequisite: ENGL1013 or equivalent. A study of film as a literary form closely related to the novel. Students will watch film classics of the major genres and subject them to critical analysis and discussion.

ENGL2213 Introduction to Drama

Prerequisite: ENGL1013 or equivalent. A study of drama as literature; a study of terminology and elements of drama and the reading of selected works, including both classic and contemporary.

ENGL2223 Introduction to Poetry

Prerequisite: ENGL1013 or equivalent. A study of basic form, terminology and specific works.

ENGL2263 Mythology

Prerequisite: ENGL1013 or equivalent. An introduction to the Western mythologies and a study of their influence on Western literature.

ENGL2283 Science Fiction and Fantasy

Prerequisite: ENGL1013 or equivalent. A survey course which covers classics of the science fiction and fantasy genres. Approach to the works is both historical and thematic.

ENGL2293 Themes in Literature

Prerequisite: ENGL1013 or equivalent. A study of a significant theme in selected literary works. Course content will vary. May not be repeated for credit as ENGL2293.

ENGL2513 Methods of Research

Prerequisite: ENGL1023 or equivalent. An introduction to techniques for research and writing.

ENGL2881 PracticumLiterary Journal Publication

Prerequisite: ENGL1013 or equivalent. Students will work as staff members of NEBO: A Literary Journal. May be repeated for a maximum of five semester hours. Cumulative hours in ENGL2881 and ENGL48814 may not exceed nine.

ENGL3013 Systems of Grammar

Prerequisite: ENGL3023, equivalent, or consent. A synthesis of the most useful elements of traditional, transformational, and structural grammar.

ENGL(FR, GER, SPAN, SPH)3023 Introduction to Linguistics

Prerequisite: ENGL1023 or equivalent. A study of basic concepts in language, comparative characteristics of different languages, and the principles of linguistic investigation.

ENGL3043 Advanced Composition: Practice and Theory

Prerequisite: ENGL1023 or equivalent. Mastery in writing several types of exposition.

ENGL3083 Fiction Workshop

Prerequisite: ENGL2043. Concentration in the writing and evaluation of fiction. May be repeated once for credit as ENGL3083.

ENGL3093 Poetry Workshop

Prerequisite: ENGL2043. Concentration in the writing and evaluation of poetry. May be repeated once for credit as ENGL3093.

ENGL3203 Modern Novel

Prerequisite: ENGL1023 or equivalent. Reading in representative novels since 1940.

ENGL3213 Short Prose Fiction

Prerequisite: ENGL1023 or equivalent. Study of the short story and the novella.

ENGL3303 Literature of the South

Prerequisite: ENGL1023 or equivalent. Reading in representative works by writers in the South since the Civil War.

ENGL3313 American Literature to 1900

Prerequisite: ENGL1023 or equivalent. Readings in the works of colonial and nineteenthcentury American authors.

ENGL3323 Modern American Literature

Prerequisite: ENGL1023 or equivalent. Readings in the works of twentiethcentury American authors.

ENGL3413 British Literature to 1800

Prerequisite: ENGL1023 or equivalent. Readings in the works of selected early British authors.

ENGL3423 British Literature since 1800

Prerequisite: ENGL1023 or equivalent. Readings in the works of nineteenth-and twentieth-century British authors.

ENGL4013 History of the English Language

Prerequisite: ENGL3023, equivalent, or consent. The development of English sounds, inflections and vocabulary.

ENGL4023 Second Language Acquisition

Prerequisite: ENGL1023, equivalent, or permission of the instructor. An investigation and analysis of the theoretical foundations of learning a second language as a guide to the effective teaching of English to limited English proficiency (LEP) students.

ENGL4053 Seminar in Technical Communication

Prerequisite: ENGL2053 or consent. Course content will vary. May be repeated for credit as ENGL4053 if course content differs.

ENGL4083 Seminar: English Language

Prerequisite: ENGL2513, equivalent, or consent. Course content will vary. May be repeated for credit as ENGL4083 or ENGL 5083 if course content differs.

ENGL4093 Seminar in Creative Writing

Prerequisite: completion or concurrent enrollment in ENGL3083 and ENGL3093. Course content will vary. May be repeated for credit as ENGL4093 if course content varies.

ENGL4213 American Folklore

Prerequisite: ENGL2513, equivalent, or consent. A study of the forms and subjects of American folklore, folklore scholarship and bibliography; field work in collecting folklore. May not be repeated for credit as ENGL 5213.

ENGL4223 Young Adult Literature

Prerequisite: ENGL2513, equivalent, or consent. A survey of young adult literature.

ENGL4233 Literary Criticism

Prerequisite: ENGL2513, equivalent, or consent. Classical criticism through modern. May not be repeated for credit as ENGL 5233.

ENGL(TH)4263 Theatre History I

Prerequisite: ENGL2513, equivalent, or consent. A historical survey of the development of drama and theater from classical Greece through the sixteenth century.

ENGL(TH)4273 Theatre History II

Prerequisite: ENGL2513, equivalent, or consent. A historical survey of the development of drama and theatre from the seventeenth century through the nineteenth century.

ENGL4283 Seminar: World Literature

Prerequisite: ENGL2513, equivalent, or consent. Course content will vary. May be repeated for credit as ENGL4283 or ENGL 5283 if course content differs.

ENGL4383 Seminar: American Literature

Prerequisite: ENGL2513, equivalent, or consent. Course content will vary. May be repeated for credit as ENGL4383 or ENGL 5383 if course content differs.

ENGL4443 Early British Novel

Prerequisite: ENGL2513, equivalent, or consent. Reading in representative British novels of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. May not be repeated for credit as ENGL 5443.

ENGL4453 Chaucer

Prerequisite: ENGL2513, equivalent, or consent. Reading in representative works. May not be repeated for credit as ENGL 5453.

ENGL4463 Shakespeare

Prerequisite: ENGL2513, equivalent, or consent. Reading selected comedies, histories, tragedies. May not be repeated for credit as ENGL 5463.

ENGL4483 Seminar: British Literature

Prerequisite: ENGL2513, equivalent, or consent. Course content will vary. May be repeated for credit as ENGL4483 or ENGL 5483 if course content differs.

ENGL4683 Seminar In Women's Studies

Prerequisite: ENGL2513, equivalent, or consent. Course content will vary. May be repeated for credit as ENGL4683 or ENGL 5683 if course content differs.

ENGL4703 Teaching English as a Second Language

Prerequisite: ENGL1023, equivalent, or consent. An investigation and practice in teaching different levels of English grammar, oral communication, comprehension skills, reading, and composition to foreign students.

ENGL4713 ESL Assessment

Prerequisite: ENGL1023, equivalent, or consent. An introduction to the tools, techniques, and procedures for evaluating the English proficiency and language development of ESL students.

ENGL4723 Teaching People of Other Cultures

Prerequisite: ENGL1023, equivalent, or consent. An examination of cultural diversity in Arkansas and the United States, designed for prospective ESL teachers.

ENGL4733 Teaching English in the Secondary School

Prerequisite: Admission to Stage II of the teacher education program. To be taken within one year before student teaching. An introduction to methods and materials used to teach secondary English.

ENGL4813 Senior Project in Creative Writing

Prerequisite: completion or concurrent enrollment in ENGL3083 and ENGL3093. Completion of a significant creative writing project approved by the instructor.

ENGL48814 PracticumEditing Literary Journal

Prerequisite: ENGL3083, 3093, or consent. To select and edit writing for publication and to direct staff members in the production of NEBO: A Literary Journal. Candidates for editorial positions must apply to the English Department at the start of the spring semester. May be repeated for a maximum of six semester hours. Cumulative hours in ENGL2881 and ENGL48814 may not exceed nine.

ENGL49914 Special Problems in English

Prerequisite: English major or minor and consent of instructor and department head. Course content and credit are designed to meet the needs of the student.

Finance

FIN2013 Personal Finance

Prerequisites: sophomore standing. A course designed to provide students with the fundamental skills of personal financial planning and goal achievement. Topics covered include financial planning, cash and credit management, insurance, investment, and retirement and estate planning.

FIN3043 Investments I

This course provides the fundamental concepts of the investment area including markets, stocks and bonds, investment environments, economic, industry and security analysis, and portfolio concepts. May not be taken for credit after successful completion of ECON3043.

FIN3063 Business Finance

Prerequisite or corequisite: BUAD2053. Nature of business finance and its relation to economics, accounting, and law; role of the financial manager and financial markets; financial forecasting, planning, and budgeting; securities valuation, capital budgeting, and cost of capital; capital structure and working capital management; international finance. May not be taken for credit after successful completion of ECON3063.

FIN4023 Investments II

Prerequisite: FIN3043 (ECON3043). This course provides further work with investment concepts involving derivative securities, specialized investment products, international investing, real estate, insurance products, construction of a portfolio, and work with computerized investment software. May not be taken for credit after successful completion of ECON4023.

FIN4043 Principles of Risk and Insurance

Prerequisite: FIN3063 (ECON3063). A course designed to provide an understanding of the insurance field. Course content includes a survey of the extent and types of risk in business; ways of dealing with business risk; and a survey of insurance for risk-bearing purposes. May not be taken for credit after successful completion of ECON4043.

FIN4053 Internship I in Economics/Finance

Prerequisite: Permission of the Instructor, Department Head and Dean; Junior Standing; minimum 2.5 overall GPA. A supervised, practical experience providing undergraduate ECON/FIN majors with a hands-on, professional experience in a position relating to an area of career interest. The student will work in a local cooperating business establishment under the supervision of a member of management of that firm. A School of Business faculty member will observe and consult with the students and the management of the cooperating firm periodically during the period of the internship. Students will be required to make a classroom presentation, maintain an internship log, and prepare a final term paper. Note: Only three hours of internship may be used to satisfy the curriculum requirements for economics and finance electives. Additional hours may be used to satisfy the curriculum requirements for general electives.

FIN4063 Internship II in Economics/Finance

Prerequisite: Internship I, permission of the Instructor, Department Head and Dean; Junior Standing; minimum 2.5 overall GPA. To be taken following completion of Internship I. A supervised, practical experience providing undergraduate ECON/FIN majors with a hands-on, professional experience in a position relating to an area of career interest. The student will work in a local cooperating business establishment under the supervision of a member of management of that firm. A School of Business faculty member will observe and consult with the students and the management of the cooperating firm periodically during the period of the internship. Students will be required to make a classroom presentation, maintain an internship log, and prepare a final term paper. Note: Only three hours of internship may be used to satisfy the curriculum requirements for economics and finance electives. Additional hours may be used to satisfy the curriculum requirements for general electives.

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology

FW1001 Orientation to Fisheries and Wildlife Science

Fall. An introduction to professions in fisheries and wildlife science. Required of fisheries and wildlife students during their first fall term on the Tech campus. Lecture one hour.

FW2003 Elements of Fish and Wildlife Management

Fall. Principles of fish and wildlife management for the nonmajor, including fish and wildlife identification and the role of various natural resourceorganizations in conservation. Lecture three hours.

FW3001 Junior Seminar in Fisheries and Wildlife Biology

Spring. Restricted to junior fisheries and wildlife biology majors or by consent of instructor. Instruction and practice in methods for scientific presentation and resume preparation. Assessment of career goals. Lecture one hour.

FW3074 Habitat Evaluation

Spring. Introduction to aquatic and terrestrial habitat mensuration and evaluation for field biologists, with emphasis on the description and demonstration of evaluation procedures and software. Lecture two hours, laboratory four hours. $10 laboratory fee.

FW(BIOL)3084 Ichthyology

Fall. Prerequisite: BIOL1124. Systematics, collection, identification, natural history, and importance of fishes. Lecture two hours, laboratory four hours. $10 laboratory fee.

FW(BIOL)3114 Principles of Ecology

Fall and Spring. Prerequisites: BIOL1124, 1134, and one semester of chemistry. Responses of organisms to environmental variables, bioenergetics, population dynamics, community interactions, ecosystem structure and function, and major biogeographical patterns. Lecture two hours, laboratory four hours. $10 laboratory fee.

FW(BIOL)3144 Ornithology

Spring. Prerequisite: BIOL1124. An introduction to the biology of birds. The course covers aspects of anatomy, physiology, behavior, natural history, evolution, and conservation of birds. Laboratories address field identification and natural history of the birds of Arkansas. Students will be expected to participate in an extended 5-7day field trip. Lecture two hours, lab four hours. $10 laboratory fee.

FW(BIOL)3154 Mammalogy

Fall. Prerequisite: BIOL1124. Taxonomy identification, ecology, and study natural history of the mammals. Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours. $10 laboratory fee.

FW(BIOL)3163 Biodiversity and Conservation Biology

Spring. Prerequisites: FW(BIOL)3114 and an animal or plant taxonomy course, or permission of instructor. The concepts of, processes that produce, and factors that threaten biological diversity are introduced and examined. Further emphasis is placed on unique problems associated with small population size, management of endangered species, aspects and importance of the human dimension, and practical applications of conservation biology. Lecture three hours.

FW3204 Aquaculture

Spring. Prerequisite: BIOL1124 or permission of instructor. Course is designed to provide students with the essentials of successful warmwater aquaculture including crayfish and alligators. Basics of cool and coldwater aquaculture are also covered. Emphasis ranges from maintenance of brood stock and culture of fingerlings to production of marketsize fish. Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours plus several full-day field trips that may involve weekend or overnight travel. $10 laboratory fee.

FW4001 Senior Seminar in Fisheries and Wildlife Biology

Fall. Restricted to senior fisheries and wildlife biology majors or by consent of instructor. Designed to integrate various aspects of fisheries and wildlife biology by covering current topics and to acquaint students with areas not covered elsewhere in the curriculum. Lecture one hour.

FW4003 Principles of Wildlife Management

Spring. Prerequisite: FW(BIOL)3114 or permission of instructor. Principles of managing wildlife resources with emphasis on the history of wildlife resources in the United States, population ecology, wildlife values, and the administration of wildlife resources and resources agencies. Lecture three hours.

FW4013 Wildlife Techniques

Fall. Prerequisites: FW(BIOL)3114 or permission of instructor. Instruction in current wildlife techniques including habitat evaluation and manipulation, estimation of wildlife abundance, capturing and marking, identification, aging, and scientific writing. Course is structured around a research project that requires use of popular wildlife techniques. Lecture one hour, laboratory four hours. $10 laboratory fee.

FW4014 Forest Ecology and Management

Fall. Prerequisite: FW(BIOL)3114. An in-depth coverage of ecological interactions in forested ecosystems. Lectures cover biotic and abiotic factors that influence development and species compositions of forest stands. Wildlife habitat relationships in forested ecosystems will also be discussed. Laboratories will familiarize students with field techniques and management activities important in the major forest types of Arkansas. Lecture two hours, lab four hours. $10 laboratory fee.

FW(BIOL)4024 Limnology

Spring. Prerequisite: FW(BIOL)3114. A study of physical and chemical processes in fresh water and their effects on organisms in lakes and streams. Laboratory sessions and field trips demonstrate limnological instrumentation and methodology. Lecture two hours, laboratory four hours. $10 laboratory fee.

FW4034 Geographic Information Systems in Natural Resources

Spring. Prerequisites: PSY2053 or MATH2163 and Computer Science elective or GEOG4833. Use of GIS technology in wildlife and fisheries management and research. Emphasis placed on creation, maintenance, and analysis of spatially explicit data. Two hours lecture, four hours lab. $10 laboratory fee.

FW4043 Fisheries Techniques

Fall. Prerequisites: FW(BIOL)3114 and a computer science elective, or permission of instructor. The techniques and practices of warmwater fish management. Major emphasis will be placed on survey techniques, data collection, and data analysis techniques. Lecture one hour, laboratory four hours. $10 laboratory fee.

FW4053 Fish and Wildlife Administration

Fall. Prerequisites: FW4003 or 4083, or permission of instructor. The course will familiarize the student with the administration of fish and wildlife agencies, including organizational designs and policies, planning, directing, budgeting, personnel management, and public relations. Special consideration will be given to public, scientific, and economic considerations in the decisionmaking process. Lecture three hours.

FW4083 Principles of Fisheries Management

Fall. Prerequisites: FW(BIOL)3114, one semester of statistics, and one semester of calculus, or permission of instructor. The principles and theory of warmwater fish management with major emphasis on the human dimension in fisheries management, fishery assessment, population dynamics, and common management practices. Lecture three hours.

FW4116 Internship

Each semester, Prerequisites: Consent of program director. Placement in selected agency settings in studenttrainee status under professional guidance of both agency supervisor and faculty. Emphasis will be placed on application of classroom theory to agency requirements which fulfill student's individual career interest. No prior experience credit will be granted. Minimum of 400 clock hours of supervision and written report required.

FW4881-4 Advanced Topics

On demand. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Open to junior and senior students only. Offers special instruction on fisheries and wildlife topics that are not otherwise covered in the curriculum. The primary focus of the course will vary from offering to offering, thus the course may be taken more than once.

FW49914 Directed Research in Fisheries and Wildlife Management

Each semester. Open to fisheries and wildlife majors with approval of department head and individual instructor who will advise on research topic. Research may vary to fit needs and interests of the student. Unless permission is granted by the department head, no more than two credit hours will be given in any semester for a particular research topic.

French

FR1014 Beginning French I

Training in the elements of French communication and comprehension. Four hours of applied class work. Laboratory work by arrangement. Advanced placement and credit by examination are available to students who have previously studied French.

FR1024 Beginning French II

Prerequisite: FR1014 or equivalent. Training in basic French communication and comprehension skills to satisfy minimum survival needs in French-speaking countries. Four hours of applied class work. Laboratory work by arrangement.

FR2014 Intermediate French I

Prerequisite: FR1024 or equivalent. Development of the skills necessary to understand and communicate in everyday situations in Frenchspeaking countries. Four hours of applied class work. Laboratory work by arrangement.

FR2024 Intermediate French II

Prerequisite: FR2014 or equivalent. Further development of the skills necessary to understand and communicate in everyday situations in French-speaking countries. Four hours of applied class work. Laboratory work by arrangement.

FR3003 Conversation and Composition I

Prerequisite: FR2024 or equivalent. Development of advanced control of French communication and comprehension through the study of Frenchlanguage media (radio broadcasts, television newscasts and commercials, prose texts, periodical articles) and through classroom debates and simulations. Laboratory work by arrangement.

FR3013 Conversation and Composition II

Prerequisite: FR3003 or equivalent. Continuation of FR3003.

FR(ENGL, GER, SPAN, SPH)3023 Introduction to Linguistics

Prerequisite: ENGL1023 and FR2024 or equivalent. A study of basic concepts in language, comparative characteristics of different languages, and the principles of linguistic investigation.

FR3113 Culture and Civilization

Prerequisite: FR2024 or equivalent. Development of an understanding of French life through study and analysis of French history and geography texts, film, advertising, and mass media.

FR4213 French Literature to 1800

Prerequisite: FR2024 or equivalent. Careful study of selected French texts to introduce students to various literary genres and general literary trends.

FR4223 French Literature since 1800

Prerequisite: FR2024 or equivalent. A study of representative texts from the period for understanding of genres, styles, and language.

FR4283 Seminar in French

Prerequisite: FR3013. Course content will vary. May be repeated for credit if course content varies.

FR4701 Special Methods in French

Prerequisites: Admission to student teaching phase of the teacher education program and concurrent enrollment in SEED4909. Intensive on-campus exploration of the principles of curriculum construction, teaching methods, use of community resources, and evaluation as related to teaching French.

FR(GER, LAT, SPAN)4703 Foreign Language Teaching Methods

Prerequisites: FR3013 and 3113 or equivalent; admission to Stage II of the Secondary Education sequence or equivalent. Survey of instructional methods with discussions and demonstrations of practical techniques for the teaching of foreign language.

FR4801 Cultural Immersion and Research

Prerequisite: Enrollment in French Immersion Weekend and permission of instructor. Intensive study of French cultural topics followed by individual research projects. May be repeated for credit if content varies.

FR(GER, JPN, SPAN)4901-3 Foreign Language Internship

Prerequisites: Advanced foreign language proficiency; permission of the instructor and the department head. The Foreign Language Internship is intended primarily for majors in foreign languages or international studies. It is designed to provide outstanding students the opportunity to perfect their language proficiency and to acquire specific training and skills overseas. The overseas sponsor and the foreign language instructor of record will supervise the intern. Performance evaluations and a research paper will be required.

FR49914 Special Problems in French

Prerequisite: FR2024 and consent of the instructor and the department head. Designed to provide advanced students with a course of study in an area not covered by departmental course offerings.

Geography

GEOG2013 Regional Geography of the World

A survey of major regions with particular emphasis upon Europe, the Commonwealth of Independent States, the Orient, the MidEast, Africa, and Latin America.

GEOG2033 Physical Geography

A description and interpretation of the physical features of the surface zone of the earth and how man interrelates with this complex natural environment.

GEOG3113 Geography of the United States and Canada

A regional study emphasizing the physical and cultural aspects of AngloAmerica.

GEOG3303 Geography of Latin America

A regional study of the lands and people of Latin America and their interrelationships. Particular attention will be given to Mexico, Brazil, and Argentina.

GEOG3413 Geography of Europe

A regional study of the physical and cultural aspects of Europe (including the C.I.S.) and their interrelationships.

GEOG3703 Geography of Asia

A regional study of the lands and peoples of Asia and their interrelationships with particular emphasis on India, China, and Japan.

GEOG4023 Economic Geography

A study of the resources at man's disposal and his economic activities in utilizing these resources. Special attention is given to industrial and agricultural resources of leading nations. May not be taken for credit after completion of GEOG3023 nor repeated for credit as GEOG 5023 or equivalent.

GEOG4803 Seminar in Global Studies

A directed seminar in a major world region. The region and specific focus will depend upon the current world situation and student needs. May not be taken for credit after completion of GEOG 6803 nor repeated for credit as GEOG 5803 or equivalent.

GEOG4833 Geographic Information Systems

Prerequisite: COMS2003, or permission of the instructor. An introductory course dealing with computer organized spatial and attribute data. GIS is a system of specialized computer programs with the capability to manipulate and analyze data for problem solving.

GEOG49914 Special Problems in Geography

A course for minors only. Admission requires consent of department head.

Geology

GEOL1004 Essentials of Earth Science

An introduction to the fundamental topics of earth science including physical and historical geology, oceanography, and meteorology. Laboratory exercises include the study of minerals, rocks, fossils, topographic and geologic maps, and oceanographic and meteorological phenomena. Laboratory work will stress the use of the scientific method of problem solving. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours. $10 laboratory fee. Duplicate credit for GEOL1004 and GEOL1014 will not be allowed. Elementary education majors who take both the GEOL1004 and GEOL1014 will receive credit for GEOL1004 only. All other majors who take both GEOL1004 and GEOL1014 will receive credit for only GEOL1014 unless student has selected option (b) for completing the science area of the General Education requirements.

GEOL1014 Physical Geology

A survey of the earth's features and forces which modify its surface and interior. Laboratory exercises include the study of minerals, rocks, and landforms through the use of topographic maps and aerial photography. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours. $10 laboratory fee. Duplicate credit for GEOL1014 and GEOL1004 will not be allowed. Elementary education majors who take both the GEOL1014 and GEOL1004 will receive credit for GEOL1004 only. All other majors who take both GEOL1004 and GEOL1014 will receive credit for only GEOL1014 unless student has selected option (b) for completing the science area of the General Education requirements.

GEOL2001 Seminar

(See GEOL3001.)

GEOL2024 Historical Geology

Prerequisite: GEOL1014. A survey of the physical and biological history of the earth. Laboratory exercises include the study of fossils, geologic maps, and crosssections. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours. $10 laboratory fee.

GEOL(BIOL, CHEM)2111 Environmental Seminar

(See GEOL4111).

GEOL3001 Seminar

Prerequisites: GEOL1014 and 2001. Participants will prepare oral and written reports and participate in discussions of the reports. Topics for the seminar will be determined by the instructors but will be subjects which are beyond the scope of other geology courses.

GEOL3004 Structural Geology

Prerequisites: GEOL1014, 2024, and MATH1203 or 1913. A study and analysis of the structural features of the earth's crust. Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours. $10 laboratory fee.

GEOL3014 Mineralogy

Prerequisites: GEOL1014, 2024; CHEM1114 or 2124. A study of crystallography, physical and chemical properties, origin, occurrence, and structure theory of minerals. Lecture two hours, laboratory four hours. $10 laboratory fee.

GEOL3023 Geologic Field Techniques

Prerequisites: GEOL1014, 2024 and 3004. Interpretation of aerial photographs; mensuration techniques using the Brunton compass, hand level, and Jacob's staff, measurement and description of stratigraphic sections; construction of and geologic maps; collecting, sampling, and collation procedures. Lecturelaboratory four hours. $10 laboratory fee.

GEOL3044 Geomorphology

Prerequisites: GEOL1014, 2024, 3004, and 3164. A study of land forms and the processes which shape the earth's surface. Special emphasis will be placed on slopeforming and fluival processes. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours. $10 laboratory fee.

GEOL3053 Geology of Energy and Metallic Resources

Prerequisites: GEOL1014, 3014, and 3164. A study of the principal earth materials essential to local and national economies. Location, genesis, methods of extraction, and primary utilization and conservation are emphasized. Lecture three hours.

GEOL3083 Hydrogeology

Prerequisites: MATH1113 and GEOL1014 or permission of the instructor. The earth's hydrologic system is studied in terms of both empirical and quantitative aspects of the steady-state condition of groundwater and its interaction with surface water, as well as transient behavior from the influence of wells. Basic water chemistry is also covered along with transport and fate of pollutants in groundwater. Lecture 3 hours.

GEOL(BIOL,CHEM)3111 Environmental Seminar

(See GEOL4111.)

GEOL3124 Invertebrate Paleontology

Prerequisite: GEOL2024. A systematic study of invertebrate fossils and their geologic significance. Lecturelaboratory six hours. $10 laboratory fee.

GEOL3153 Environmental Geology

Prerequisite: GEOL1014. A study of the geological factors which influence the pollution of land, water, and biological resources; the role of rock and soil in the geobiological community; hydrology; landsliding and faulting in the human environment, natural resource problems; urban and landuse planning based on geological data. Lecture three hours.

GEOL3164 Petrology

Prerequisite: GEOL3014. A study of the classification, origin, geologic occurrence, physical and chemical properties of igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours. $10 laboratory fee.

GEOL4001 Seminar

(See GEOL3001).

GEOL4006 Field Geology

Each summer by arrangement. Prerequisites: GEOL1014, 2024, 3004, 3014, 3023, 3124, and 3164. A sixweek summer course of instruction in the use of geologic mapping instruments, interpretation of aerial photographs and their use in the construction of geologic maps, development of techniques necessary in geologic field work, and recognition and interpretation of geologic phenomena. $10 laboratory fee. The course is offered in cooperation with the University of Arkansas and will be taught in the Dillon, Montana region. The fee for room and board is approximately $900; cost of tuition and transportation is not included in this amount.

GEOL4013 Optical Mineralogy

Prerequisites: PHYS2024, GEOL3014, 3164. A study of minerals in thin sections with the petrographic microscope. Lecturelaboratory four hours. $10 laboratory fee.

GEOL4023 Principles of Stratigraphy and Sedimentation

Prerequisites: GEOL3124 and 3164. A study of sedimentary rocks and their stratigraphic relationships. Lecture three hours.

GEOL4034 Subsurface Geology

Prerequisites: GEOL3004, 3164, 4023, MATH1113, PHYS2014, 2024. A study of analytic procedures in selected topics in geophysics, welllogging, and subsurface geological relationships. Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours. $10 laboratory fee.

GEOL(BIOL,CHEM)4111 Environmental Seminar

A seminar for students pursuing the environmental option of geology, biology, or chemistry and other students interested in environmental sciences.

GEOL49912 Special Problems in Geology

Open to geology majors with the approval of the department head.

German

GER1014 Beginning German I

Introduction to conversation, basic grammar, reading, and writing. Four hours of classroom instruction. Advanced placement and credit by examination are available to students who have previously studied German.

GER1024 Beginning German II

Continued instruction in grammar and fundamental language skills. Four hours of classroom instruction.

GER2014 Intermediate German I

Prerequisite: GER1024 or equivalent. Instruction designed to develop greater facility in fundamental skills and more extensive knowledge of grammar. Four hours of classroom instruction.

GER2024 Intermediate German II

Instruction intended to complete the survey of the basic grammar of the language and to provide the mastery of fundamental skills essential for enrollment in upperlevel German courses. Four hours of classroom instruction.

GER3003 Conversation and Composition I

Prerequisite: GER2024 or equivalent. Further study of German based on analysis of short texts (newspaper articles, short stories, plays, poetry). Students are expected to use German in oral and written expression.

GER3013 Conversation and Composition II

Prerequisite: GER3003 or equivalent, Continuation of GER3003.

GER(ENGL, FR, SPAN, SPH)3023 Introduction to Linguistics

Prerequisites: ENGL1023 and GER2024 or equivalent. A study of basic concepts in language, comparative characteristics of different languages, and the principles of linguistic investigation.

GER3113 Culture and Civilization

Prerequisite: GER2024 or equivalent. Study of the geography, history, arts, institutions, customs, and contemporary life of the Germanspeaking peoples.

GER4213 German Literature to 1832

Prerequisite: GER2024 or equivalent. A survey of major writers and representative works from early Middle Ages through the Age of Goethe.

GER4223 German Literature since 1832

Prerequisite: GER2024 or equivalent. A survey of major writers and representative works since the Age of Goethe.

GER4283 Seminar in German

Prerequisite: GER2024 or equivalent. Course content will vary. May be repeated for credit if course content varies.

GER4701 Special Methods in German Prerequisites: Admission to student teaching phase of the teacher education program and concurrent enrollment in SEED4909. Intensive on-campus exploration of the principles of curriculum construction, teaching methods, use of community resources, and evaluation as related to teaching German.

GER(FR,SPAN)4703 Foreign Language Teaching Methods

Prerequisites: GER3013 and GER3113 or equivalent; admission to Stage II of the Secondary Education sequence or equivalent. Survey of instructional methods with discussions and demonstrations of practical techniques for teaching of foreign language.

GER(FR, JPN, SPAN)4901-3 Foreign Language Internship

Prerequisites: Advanced foreign language proficiency; permission of the instructor and the department head. The Foreign Language Internship is intended primarily for majors in foreign languages or international studies. It is designed to provide outstanding students the opportunity to perfect their language proficiency and to acquire specific training and skills overseas. The overseas sponsor and the foreign language instructor of record will supervise the intern. Performance evaluations and a research paper will be required.

GER49914 Special Problems in German

Prerequisite: GER2024 and consent of the instructor and the department head. Designed to provide advanced students with a course of study in an area not covered by departmental course offerings.

Gifted Education

GTED4003 Understanding the Gifted in Home, School, and Community

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. GTED 5003 may not be taken for credit after completion of GTED4003 or GTED 6833. A survey in gifted education providing basic knowledge and concepts of interest to parents, prospective teachers, and the community at large.

Greek

GRK1013 Beginning Classical Greek I

Instruction in the fundamentals necessary to read and write classical Greek.

GRK1023 Beginning Classical Greek II

A continuation of GRK1013.

GRK2013 Intermediate Classical Greek I

Prerequisite: GRK1023 or equivalent. A study designed to continue the development of fundamental skills and to give a general reading knowledge of classical Greek and acquaintance with classical Greek literature, history, and philosophy.

GRK2023 Intermediate Classical Greek II

A continuation of GRK2013 which concentrates on the works of Homer, Plato, Herodotus, and selected Attic dramatists.

GRK(LAT)3001 Greek and Latin Scientific Terminology

The course is designed to assist students with their understanding of English words which have their roots in Greek or Latin. Students who in their course of study need to know specialized vocabulary, such as science, math, pre-med, pre-law and nursing majors, will find this course extremely helpful.

Health Education

HLED1513 Personal Health and Wellness

Each semester. The course is designed to motivate students toward an individual responsibility for their health status and an improved quality of life. An introspective study of personal lifestyle behavior is encouraged. The interrelationship of the multicausal factors which directly affect health status and the various dimensions of personal health are addressed.

HLED3203 Consumer Health Programs

A study of current health services and the products offered by health providers to the health consumer and an examination of various diseases and disorders.

HLED4303 Methods and Materials in Health for Grades K12

Exploration of teaching methods and strategies, use of school and community resources, and evaluation related to teaching health in grades K12.

HLED4403 Nutrition and Physical Fitness

Spring. Prerequisite: PE2653. A health education course which is designed to familiarize students with food as it relates to optimal health and performance. Focus is on nutrition as it affects the physicalwork capacity of humans from resting states to high output performance.

HLED4991-3 Special Problems in Health

Independent work on approved health topics under the individual guidance of a faculty member. Admission requires consent of department head.

Health Information Management

HIM1002 Health Information Management Orientation

Fall. An introductory course with emphasis on the basics of health information management as related to career choices, giving the student a better understanding of opportunities in the field. The course will also focus on helping the student develop good study skills, career goals, and understand policies and information needed for a successful college career.

HIM2003 Fundamentals of Medical Transcription

Fall. Prerequisites: AHS2013, BUAD1001, BUAD2002, and COMS1003. Introduction to the healthcare record and medical documents. Transcription of basic medical dictation, incorporating English usage and machine transcription skills, medical knowledge, and proofreading and editing skills, and meeting progressively demanding accuracy and productivity standards.

HIM3003 Advanced Medical Transcription

Spring. Prerequisites: HIM2003 and AHS2013. Transcription of advanced original medical dictation, using advanced proofreading and editing skills, while meeting progressively demanding accuracy and productivity standards. Introduction to Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organization (JCAHO) standards for the healthcare record.

HIM3024 Introduction to Health Information Management

Fall. Prerequisite: Admission to the HIM Program. A study of the history of health records, professional ethics, the functions of a health information department, retention of records, medical forms, health information practices, and responsibilities to healthcare administration, medical staff, and other medical professionals.

HIM3033 Basic Coding Principles

Fall. Prerequisite: BIOL2004, AHS2013, or permission of instructor. An indepth study of the principles of disease and procedural coding using the ICD9CM classification system. Areas emphasized during the course include: the purpose of coding, the definition of key terms, accurate application of coding principles, methods to assure quality data, and a review of the impact of prospective reimbursement on the function of coding.

HIM3043 Advanced Concepts in Health Information

Fall. Prerequisite: HIM3024. A study of such advanced concepts as quality improvement, utilization review, licensure and accreditation standards, medical staff, and interdisciplinary relationships.

HIM3132 Health Data and Statistics

Spring. Prerequisite: HIM3024. A study of the methods of recording diagnoses and operations by recognized systems of disease, procedural and pathological nomenclatures and classification systems, manual and computerized systems of indexing and abstracting, research and statistical techniques, and health information data handling.

HIM3133 Alternative Health Records

Spring. Prerequisite: HIM3024. A study of health record requirements in non-traditional settings such as cancer programs, ambulatory care facilities, mentalhealth centers, and longterm care facilities. May not be taken for credit after completion of HIM3131.

HIM3142 Healthcare Registries

Spring. A junior-level course intended to explore the many different healthcare registries that exist, with special attention to cancer registry programs. This course will also orient the student to the information and skills needed to abstract cancer cases using the ICD-0-2 coding system, Registries Operations and Data Standards (ROADS) manual, and CPDMS software, as well as stage cancers using the AJCC Cancer Staging Manual and the SEER Summary Staging Guide.

HIM4033 Advanced Coding Principles

Spring. Prerequisite: HIM3033. A continuation of HIM3033, dealing with advanced principles of coding using ICD9CM and CPT4. Experience with coding of health records as well as DRG grouping and the administrative aspects of coding will be emphasized. May not be taken for credit after completion of HIM4032.

HIM4063 Organization and Administration

Fall. Prerequisites: HIM3024 and senior standing. A study of the application of the principles of organization, administration, supervision, human relations, work methods, and organizational patterns in the health information department. The duties and relationships of the health information manager and the social forces affecting the department and current trends in hospital and medical care are investigated.

HIM4073 Legal Concepts for the Health Fields

Spring. Prerequisites: HIM3024 and senior standing, or permission of instructor. A study of the principles of law as applied to the health field. Consideration is given to the importance of health records as legal documents as well as a general introduction to the law, administration of the law, legal aspects of healthcare facility and medical staff organization, release of information, confidential communication and consents and authorizations.

HIM4083 Health Organization Trends

Spring. Prerequisites: HIM3024 and senior standing, or permission of instructor. A comprehensive review of the trends and changes in the healthcare field. Historical aspects of healthcare organization and governmental health agencies are reviewed. Emphasis is placed on current events in the healthcare arena.

HIM4092 Research in Health Information Management

Spring. Prerequisites: HIM3024 and senior standing. A study of the specific research methodology used in a health information management setting. Emphasis will be given to handson performance of research in conjunction with area health care facilities and agencies. Formal presentation of research will also be a component of the course.

HIM4153 Principles of Disease

Spring. Prerequisites: AHS2013, BIOL2004, and permission of instructor. An introduction to medical science, including the etiology, treatment and prognosis of various diseases. Emphasis is given to the medical information as viewed from the standpoint of a health information management professional.

HIM4182 Directed Practice I

Fall. Prerequisites: HIM3024, HIM3043, HIM3133, HIM3132 and HIM3033. Active participation within an actual health information management department providing a supervised learning experience through which the student develops insight, understanding, and skills in health information procedures, accepts responsibilities and recognizes the need for confidentiality.

HIM4292 Directed Practice II

Spring. Prerequisites: HIM4182. A supervised learning experience through which the student learns to recognize the contribution of and learns to work with other professional and nonprofessional personnel, learns to recognize and deal with personnel problems in a health information department.

HIM4892 Seminar in Health Information

First summer term. Corequisite: HIM4895. A seminar, utilizing the case method approach, on problem situations encountered in the field of health information management. This course includes discussion of problems that arise during their affiliation experience.

HIM4895 Affiliation

First summer term. Prerequisites: Successful completion of all required HIM courses except HIM4892. Provides the student with management experience in the activities and responsibilities of the health information management professional. Augments theoretical instruction received during previous courses. Student is actively involved in the management process while under direct supervision of a qualified health information management professional. Although every effort is made to secure a convenient locale, the student must assume full financial responsibility for this assignment.

HIM4983 Systems Analysis for Health Information Management

Fall. Prerequisites: COMS1003, COMS2003, HIM3024, and senior standing. A course designed to provide a detailed study of the relationship between health information management departments and computerized information systems. Students will learn from a variety of projects related directly to the clinical setting.

HIM49914 Special Problems in Health Information Management

Each semester. Open to health information management senior students only. The problems will vary to fit the needs of the student and reflect the continual changes in the allied health field.

History

HIST1503 World Civilization I

The political, economic, and social development of man from the earliest times to the modern period. May not be taken for credit after completion of HIST1403.

HIST1513 World Civilization II

Continuation of HIST1503. May not be taken for credit after completion of HIST1413.

HIST2003 US History to 1865

A study of the development of the American nation with emphasis upon the winning of independence, the origin of the Constitution, the rise of Jeffersonian Democracy, European influence upon America, Jacksonian Democracy, westward expansion, the emergence of sectionalism, and the Civil War.

HIST2013 US History since 1865

The history of the development of the American nation since the Civil War, with particular attention to the essentials for understanding the problems confronting America today.

HIST2513 Sources and Methods in History

Required course for History/Political Science and History/Education majors. These majors must take the course prior to enrolling in any history course at the 3000-4000 level or in the same semester in which the first such course is taken. This course introduces techniques and methods of historical research, basic historiography, bibliographical aids, and the study and writing of history.

HIST3013 Colonial America

The European background, the settlement of British colonies, the development of provincial institutions, and the emergence of an American civilization in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries.

HIST3023 The Era of the American Revolution

The deterioration of empire relationships from 1763 to 1776, with an examination of the causes and consequences of the American Revolution and the postwar problems leading to the establishment of a new government under the Constitution in 1789.

HIST3033 The Age of Jefferson and Jackson, 17891840

The social, cultural, economic, and political climate in which JeffersonianJacksonian democracy developed.

HIST3043 Civil War and Reconstruction

The social, political, economic, and intellectual backgrounds of the war; the military operations; analysis of Reconstruction.

HIST3063 Industrialization and Protest-The United States: 1877-1914

Explores the major issues associated with Gilded Age America (immigration, industrialization, urbanization, imperialism, rise or organized labor) and examines the origins, goals, and legacies of the Populist and Progressive reform movements. May not be taken for credit after completion of HIST3053.

HIST3073 The Ascent to World Power-The United States: 1914-1945

Examines the American entry and contribution in World War One; the post-war settlement; the various social, economic, and political trends of the 1920s; the Great Depression; the New Deal; American foreign policy in the inter-war era; and the American role in World War Two, and its effects on American society and culture.

HIST3083 The United States: 1945-Present

Explores the origins of and American responses to the Cold War, the rise of various reform movements in the 1950s-60s, the New Frontier and Great Society programs, the Vietnam War, and the rise of the New Right. May not be taken for credit after completion of HIST4003.

HIST3103 The Old South,

A survey of the political, social, and economic development of the American South before the Civil War.

HIST3123 The New South, 1865 to the present

A survey of the political, social, and economic development of the American South from the end of the Civil War to the present.

HIST3133 American Political Ideas

The background and development of American political ideas from the colonial period to the present. Emphasis is placed on colonial political theory, the Founding, conflict and consensus prior to the Civil War, the response to industrialization, the rise of the positive state, nationalism, the New Left and New Right, and current trends.

HIST3353 History of Latin America

A history of the peoples, institutions, traditions, and culture of Latin America, stressing economic, social, and political relations with the United States and Europe.

HIST3413 History of Classical Greece and Rome

The origins and development of Classical civilization in ancient Greece, the rise of the Roman Republic, and the ascendancy and decline of the Roman Empire.

HIST3423 History of the Middle Ages, 3001300

Decline of the ancient Roman civilization; rise, ascendancy, and decline of medieval civilization; emphasis upon the Christian church and the rise of national monarchies.

HIST3433 The Renaissance and European Expansion 1300-1550

Fuelled by a growing urban economy and despite the setbacks of the Black Death, Europeans during the Renaissance revived and adapted models of classical learning, created new forms of artistic and vernacular expression, forged national identities, opened up new trade routes, and encountered a New World.

HIST3443 The Reformation and Early Modern Europe 1500-1688

A study of the social, political, intellectual and cultural impact of the Protestant Reformation, the Roman Catholic response, the sixteenth and seventeenth-century Wars of Religion, the development of confessional cultures, and the continued rise of the European nation-state in both its absolutist and constitutional forms.

HIST3473 The Age of Enlightenment 1688-1789

A study of the changes in the political, cultural, intellectual, and social environments which characterized Europe during the period 1688-1789 which transformed the roles of the Citizen, the State, and the Church.

HIST3453 The Era of the French Revolution and Napoleon, 17631815

A study of the new ideas and forces in Europe which caused the French Revolution; the events and consequences of the Revolution, including the establishment and demise of the French imperium in Europe.

HIST4013 American Military History

A study of the American military from its colonial origins to the present, including the development of the military establishment and its relationship with American society. May not be taken for credit after completion of MS2022 prior to 198384 or repeated for credit as HIST 5013 or equivalent.

HIST4023 Vietnam War

A study of the American involvement in Vietnam, from 1945 until 1975. Emphasis will rest on the actual period of war in Vietnam. May not be taken for credit after completion of the equivalent course under HIST/POLS4983 nor be repeated for credit as HIST 5023.

HIST4033 The American West

Study of the American frontier as a place, as a process, and as a state of mind influential in shaping institutions and attitudes during the expansion of this nation westward from Atlantic to Pacific. May not be repeated for credit as HIST 5033 or equivalent.

HIST(POLS)4043 American Constitutional Development

Development and application of the great constitutional principles by the Supreme Court in the evolution of American government as seen in the leading cases dealing with judicial review, separation of powers, and federal system; protection of personal rights, interstate commerce, taxation, and due process of law in economic regulation and control.

HIST4053 Economic History of the United States

A study of the major economic forces which have helped influence, and been influenced by, United States history. Particular emphasis will be given to the development of agriculture, business, industry, and labor in their American setting. May not be repeated for credit as HIST 5053 or equivalent.

HIST4093 American Diplomatic History

A study of our past and present relations with other nations, with attention to changes brought about in international affairs by the evolving economic and political conditions.

HIST(POLS)4113 Racial and Cultural Minorities in American History

A study of the role of racial and cultural minorities in America and the interrelationship of these minorities with American society from colonial times to the present with emphasis on Native Americans, African Americans, and Mexican Americans. May not be repeated for credit as HIST 5113 or equivalent.

HIST4153 History of Arkansas

A study of the history of Arkansas from prehistoric times to the present, noting political, social, economic, and cultural trends. May not be taken for credit after completion of HIST3153 nor repeated for credit as HIST 5153 or equivalent.

HIST4203 Women in American Social History

A treatment of women in Western and American social history in their lifestyles and economic and family roles. May not be taken for credit after completion of HIST3203 nor repeated for credit as HIST 5203 or equivalent.

HIST4433 Europe in the Nineteenth Century, 18151914

Political, economic, and cultural history of Europe with emphasis on imperialism in Africa and Asia; wars of the last century, and causes of World War I.

HIST4443 Europe in the Twentieth Century

European history from World War I to the present, with emphasis on the great wars; depression; revolution, the rise of Fascism, Communism, and economic and political nationalism; the League of Nations and the United Nations. May not be repeated for credit as HIST 5443 or equivalent.

HIST4463 History of Russia

A study of the cultural and political history of Russia from the reign of Peter the Great to the present, emphasizing trends in the nineteenth century which culminated in the Bolshevik Revolution. May not be repeated for credit as HIST 5463 or equivalent.

HIST4473 Constitutional and Political History of England to 1689 AD

A survey of the political, legal, and constitutional development of England, with particular emphasis on England's development in relation to that of Western Europe in general. May not be taken for credit after completion of HIST3483 nor repeated for credit as HIST 5473 or equivalent.

HIST4483 Economic History of Europe

A study of the structure and evolution of European economic development with emphasis on agriculture, trade, industrial production, and business organization. May not be repeated for credit as HIST 5483 or equivalent.

HIST4493 Modern Britain, 1689 to the Present

A study of the cultural, political, and constitutional history of England in the modern era, with a consideration of the influence of England upon the institutions of her colonies and of the role of England in the economic development of the Western World. May not be taken for credit after completion of HIST3493 nor repeated for credit as HIST 5493 or equivalent.

HIST4603 The Modern Far East

This course deals primarily with the history of Asia after 1800. The major stress is placed upon the history of China, India, and Japan.

HIST4703 History of Modern Africa

A treatment of African history since 1600, dealing with the development of African states in subSaharan Africa up to present African nations. May not be repeated for credit as HIST 5703 or equivalent.

HIST4713 Social Studies Methods for Secondary Teachers

A course in subject-matter applications for secondary teacher education candidates (grades 7-12) in social studies. The course will incorporate a variety of instructional models, activities, and examples, as well as the integration of traditional and non-traditional resource materials. Must be completed prior to student teaching.

HIST4813 World War II

A study of World War II, 1939 through 1945, in its origins and spread through world theaters. May not be taken for credit after completion of the equivalent course under HIST/POLS4983 nor repeated for credit as HIST 5813.

HIST4963 Senior Seminar

A required course for senior History and Political Science majors. Course content will cover a directed seminar in specified American or European History. Research techniques will be emphasized.

HIST(POLS)49813 Social Sciences Seminar

A directed seminar in an area of social sciences. The specific focus will depend upon research under way, community or student need, and the unique educational opportunity available. May be repeated for credit if course content changes.

HIST49914 Special Problems in History

A course for majors and minors only. Admission requires consent by department head.

University Honors

HONR1001 Freshman Honors Seminar

Prerequisite: Acceptance into the honors program, approval of Honors Program Director. An introductory course to the honors program, teamwork and multidisciplinary problem solving.

HONR4093 Senior Honors Project

Prerequisites: Approval of the Director of Honors Program (if used for departmental requirement, all applicable prerequisites also apply). A team or individual independent research project will be completed. Projects will include some aspect of academic investigation appropriate to the subject area chosen. Written and oral presentation of project findings will be required.

Hospitality Administration

HA(RP)1001 Orientation to Parks, Recreation, and Hospitality Administration

Orientation to the Parks, Recreation and Hospitality professions. An overview of the career opportunities in various Park, Recreation and Hospitality agencies and industries. Weekly speakers from PRHA agencies, industry and education will provide information on current issues in their professional areas of expertise.

HA1013 Sanitation Safety

A survey of the food service industry to include its history, various food service systems, organization and operations, and franchising. Emphasizes the aspects of sanitation. Upon passing exam, results in certification from the Educational Foundation of the National Restaurant Association.

HA1043 Introduction to Hospitality Management

The history and development of the hospitality industry which comprises food, lodging, and tourism management, an introduction to management principles and concepts used in the service industry, and career opportunities in the field.

HA2043 Lodging Operations

A survey of the lodging industry to include its history, growth and development, and future direction. Emphasis on front office procedures and interpersonal dynamics from reservations through the night audit. Successful completion of standardized exam results in certification from the Educational Foundation of the National Restaurant Association.

HA2813 Basic Human Nutrition in Hospitality Administration

Study of the relationship between nutrition and health as a basis for food choices of all ages; the application of nutrient functions in human life processes and cycles; how balanced eating promotes healthy lifestyles. Current concepts and controversies are highlighted. Successful completion of standardized exam results in certification from the National Restaurant Association. Web-based course.

HA2913 Principles of Food Preparations

Prerequisites: HA1013 and HA2813. Focus of the principles, techniques and theories of food preparation emphasizing nutritional content, proper use and selection of equipment, while stressing sanitation quality controls, and guest accommodations that focus on food production. 2 hours lecture and 3 hours laboratory. $50 laboratory fee required.

HA(RP)3043 Work Experience I

Fall, Spring or Summer. By permission. Supervised field application of class skills and knowledge in Parks, Recreation and Hospitality work situations. Students are given the opportunity to take part in meaningful management and work experiences in actual work situations under the supervision of both university faculty and professionals in the field. Minimum of 80 clock hours of work experience. Lecture one hour, laboratory four hours.

HA3063 Dining Service Management

Prerequisite: HA2913. Analysis and development of dining service management skills including leadership behavior, motivation, communication, training, staffing, etiquette, and professional service. Lecture two hours, lab three hours.$50 lab fee.

HA(RP)4001 Internship Preparation

Prerequisites: PRHA major, senior standing, two semesters prior to internship, and completion of RP/HA3043 (if required for major) or permission of department head. Preparation for the internship experience.

HA(RP)4003 Fundamentals of Tourism

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor or PRHA major. An overview of tourism, the components of tourism, and how it relates to the hospitality industry. Exploration of current and future trends and the effects on the economy, as well as social and political impacts of tourism are examined. Web-based course.

HA4013 Hospitality Marketing and Sales

The organization of the marketing function and its role and responsibility in developing an integrated marketing program. Special attention to the conduct of the "sales blitz," convention sales and management, and the role of travelrelated services to the marketing function.

HA4023 Hospitality Facilities Management and Design

Prerequisites: Junior standing plus nine hours of HA courses or by permission. The fundamental principles of facilities planning, facilities management, and maintenance for all segments of the hospitality industry. Application principles in the preparation of a typical layout and design. Upon passing exam, results in certification from the Educational Institute of the American Hotel and Motel Association.

HA4033 Legal Aspects of Hospitality Administration

Prerequisites: Senior standing or permission of instructor and BUAD2033. Solving practical management problems through planning, establishment of policy, analysis, and the application of accounting and quantitative methods. Cases and computer simulations from the core of the course.

HA4043 Menu Analysis and Purchasing

Prerequisites: HA2913, 4073 4074, and COMS2003. Basic principles of purchasing food, beverage, and non-food items, with particular attention to product identification and to the receiving, storing and issuing sequence. Menu development and design. Successful completion of standardized exam results in certification from the Educational Institute of the American Hotel and Motel Association.

HA4053 Meetings and Conventions Management

Prerequisites: Junior standing plus nine hours of HA courses or by permission. Planning and managing meetings and conventions in the hospitality industry.

HA4063 Beverage Management

Prerequisite: 21 years of age, HA major or permission of the instructor. Selection, storage, and service of beverages with emphasis on controls, merchandising, pricing, history, social and legal concerns. Successful completion of standardized exam results in certification in C.A.R.E. (Controlling Alcohol Risks Effectively) from the Educational Institute of the American Hotel and Motel Association and in Beverage Management from the Educational Foundation of the National Restaurant Foundation. Lecture two hours, lab two hours. $25.00 Lab fee required.

HA4073 Hospitality Financial Analysis

Prerequisites: ACCT2003 and 2013, HA major. Accounting principles and procedures for the Hospitality Industry as an aid in management planning, decision making and control, financial statements, statement analysis, flow of funds, cash analysis, accounting concepts, cost accounting budgets, capital expenditures, and pricing decisions. Upon passing exam, results in certification from the Educational Institute of the American Hotel and Motel Association.

HA4074 Quantity Food Production

Prerequisites: HA2913 and HA4043. Standards, techniques and practices that include organizing, purchasing, costing, preparing and serving of food in a quantity food production setting. Menu development and marketing applications are utilized in laboratory. 2 hours lecture and 4 hour laboratory. $50 laboratory fee required.

HA(RP)4093 Resort Management

Prerequisites: Junior standing and nine hours of RP or HA courses or by permission. An in-depth study of resorts with respect to their planning, development, organization, management, marketing, visitor characteristics, and environmental consequences. Passing exam results in certification from the Educational Institute of the American Hotel and Motel Association.

HA(RP)4113 Personnel Management in Parks, Recreation, and Hospitality Administration

Prerequisites: Junior standing and nine hours of RP or HA courses. An overview of personnel considerations in various Recreation and Park agencies and the Hospitality industry. Laws, legal issues, structure, staffing, motivation, training, conduct, policies and other aspects of agency/industry personnel relations will be examined using case-studies, as well as other methods. Upon passing exam, results in certification from the Educational Institute of the American Hotel and Motel Association.

HA(RP)4116 Internship

Each semester. Parks, Recreation, and Hospitality Administration majors only. Prerequisites: Senior standing, current certifications in CPR, Standard and Advanced First Aid and consent of department head. Placement in selected agency settings in student-trainee status under professional guidance of both agency supervisor and faculty. Emphasis will be placed on application of classroom theory to agency requirements which fulfill student's individual career interest. No prior experience credit will be granted. Minimum of 600 clock hours (15 weeks) of supervision and written report required.

HA(RP)4991-3 Special Problems and Topics

On demand. Investigative studies and special problems and topics related to hospitality administration.

Industrial Electronic Technology

(These courses are for the Technical Certificate and can not be used towards a baccalaureate degree.)

TELT1014 Fundamentals of Electricity I

This course (along with Fundamentals II) is a program cornerstone presenting the concepts of electricity and magnetism. AC and DC currents and voltages are explained. Ohm's law and the power equation are used to analyze series, parallel, and series-parallel resistive circuits. Fundamental theorems are used in the analysis of resistor networks. The student becomes acquainted with the use of basic electrical instruments. Reactive circuit components are introduced.

TELT1123 Industrial Electricity I

Prerequisites: TELT1014. This course is a study of the fundamentals of motors and motor control. The subject matter includes switches, relays, transformers, three-phase power systems, DC motors, single-phase motors, three-phase motors, overload protection, and motor controllers. The National electrical Code standards for all circuits are emphasized.

TELT1214 Fundamentals of Electricity II

Prerequisite: TELT1014. This course is a continuation of TELT1014, Fundamentals of Electricity I. It is a study of various combinations of resistors, capacitors, and inductors into circuits that contain both resistance and reactance. The simulation and analysis of these circuits deepens the understanding of basic electrical concepts. Students will work with test instruments and circuit components in the laboratory.

TELT1224 Solid State I

Prerequisite: TELT1214. Semiconductor theory will explain the P.N. junction and its application in transistors and diodes. The principles of DC power supplies, amplifiers, and oscillators will be studied, ending with the application of field effect transistors.

TELT1314 Digital Electronics I

Prerequisites: TELT1224. This course will provide the basic understanding of digital circuitry. Boolean algebra and digital circuits will be stressed. These principles will be applied to understanding the concepts of microprocessors.

TELT2014 Programmable Logic Controllers (PLC) Applications

Prerequisite: TELT2313. This course provides the student with an overview of the selection, programming, operation, and capabilities/limitations of programmable logic controllers. Application examples presented will define design requirements for input/output cards, memory requirements, scan time, update time, documentation, data highway/host computer interface, etc.

TELT2214 Solid State II

Prerequisite: TELT1224. This course covers advanced electronic circuit analysis and troubleshooting. Positive and negative feedback circuits are covered including oscillators, operational amplifiers, tuned amplifiers, Class A, B, and C amplifiers. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 4 hours.

TELT2223 Power Supply Troubleshooting

Prerequisites: TELT2214. This course covers a wide range of electronic power supplies, from basic rectifiers to complex switch-mode, highly regulated supplies as used in televisions and computers.

TELT2233 Advanced PLC Systems

Prerequisite: TELT2014. This course should provide the student with the comprehensive procedures needed to design and program a PLC System. Design and installation specifications will be examined to provide the student with a first experience in implementing process control systems. Hardware and software selection, as well as, Man to Machine Interface (MMI) will also be discussed. An emphasis will be given to advanced ladder logic programming techniques. Practical programming applications will be provided through laboratory activities.

TELT2313 Industrial Electricity II

Prerequisites: TELT1123. This course covers industrial applications of electronics. Subjects studied include relay ladder logic and troubleshooting, SCRs, Triacs, UJTs, polyphase rectifiers, AC/DC motor speed control, inverters, and advanced control systems.

TELT2424 Digital Electronics II

Prerequisites: TELT1314. The basic principles of microprocessors-architecture, instruction set, arithmetic and logical operations, read-only and read/write memory, machine and assembly language programming, and interfacing will be studied with the aid of a microprocessor trainer. The principles will be applied to other industry-standard microprocessors.

TELT2503 Electronics: Special Topics

Prerequisites TELT1014, 1214, 1314. This course is designed to provide special instruction on new and emerging topics in electronics that are not otherwise covered in this curriculum. Topics for this course will be determined by the industry, the technology and the equipment to which the students are exposed. This instruction is designed to provide the student with the knowledge and skills to diagnose and repair complex equipment malfunctions.

Industrial Plant Maintenance

(These courses are for the Technical Certificate and can not be used towards a baccalaureate degree.)

TACR2014 Introduction to Air Conditioning Systems

This course is designed to teach the principles of the basic refrigeration cycle, including temperature-pressure relationships, evaporation, condensation, heat transfer, and refrigerants. The identification and use of hand tools, as well as safety principles and practices will be taught. Practical application is provided through laboratory activities.

TACR2214 Ammonia Refrigeration Systems

This course is designed to teach the components, operations, and design characteristics of commercial ammonia refrigeration systems. Applications of these principles combined with practical experience on actual commercial equipment should provide the student with the knowledge and skills to diagnose and repair normal equipment malfunctions.

TACR2212 Maintenance of Boiler and Steam Systems

Prerequisites: TACR2213 or current Boiler License. This course is designed to teach the maintenance and safe operation of boiler and steam systems. Students will study water treatment, pressurized vessels, boiler operation safety skills, troubleshooting techniques, and preventative maintenance guidelines. Application of these skills as well as experience on actual equipment should provide the student with knowledge and skills to diagnose and repair equipment malfunctions.

TACR2213 Introduction to Boiler and Steam Generation

This course is designed to teach the components, operation, and design characteristics of steam generation systems. Upon completion of this course, students will possess the knowledge needed to sit for the Arkansas Boiler License Exam. Students will gain experience on actual industrial equipment.

TDFT1013 Blueprint Reading for Machine Trades

This course is designed to develop basic skills in reading blueprints and introduces the student to various types of working drawings for engineering and manufacturing purposes. Emphasis is placed on understanding basic concepts of orthographic projection an the ability to visualize objects.

TIPM1103 Hydraulics and Pneumatics

This course is a study of the basic industrial fluid power systems common to the field of automation, including basic principles, components, standards, symbols, circuits, and troubleshooting of hydraulic and pneumatic systems.

TIPM1204 Maintenance of Plumbing Systems

This course is designed to provide special instruction in the process of identifying tubing and piping with practical applications in sizing and fitting to different configurations using mechanical fittings, soft soldering, silver brazing and aluminum soldering. The course also provides the student with the knowledge and skills to diagnose and repair commercial plumbing systems.

TIPM2014 Metallurgy

Metallurgy is a study of the chemical and mechanical properties of metals. The microstructure of the metal is determined by metallography techniques, and the properties are verified by physical testing. Alloying and heat treatment of steels are discussed in detail.

TMAC1013 Basic Machine Shop

This course covers the use of hand tools, drills, lathe cutting tools, and tapers, and study the methods of machining them. Instructions are given in the care and operation of basic machine tools, measuring instruments, and shop safety procedures. Shop projects are designed to provide practice in accurate turning, knurling, threading, and other operation on the lathe.

TMAC1025 Machine Set-Up and Operation I

Prerequisites or corequisite: TMAC1013. This course covers the set-up and operation of drilling machines, milling machines and grinders. Students learn abrasives, precision part layout and inspection, drilling, tapping, reaming and boring, as well as the care and used of precision measuring instruments. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 4 hours.

TMAC1135 Welding Option

This course is comprised of in-depth study and practice of the gas tungsten arc welding process. The student's experience begins with the development of manipulative skills through the media of oxyacetylene welding, then progresses to similar applications with TIG welds in the standard positions. Joint designs are mastered on carbon steel, aluminum, and stainless steel.

TMAC2014 Machine Set-Up and Operations II

Prerequisite or corequisite: TMAC1025. In this course students begin to work independently as expected by a machine shop employee. The basic knowledge and skills learned in previous courses are applied by working from blueprints and specifications in construction of machine shop projects.

TMAC2115 Machine Processes

Prerequisite or corequisite: TMAC2014. This course provides instruction and practice in special layout and machine set-up using the rotary table, indexing features, sine plates, and other specialized work-holding devices an machine fixtures. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 6 hours.

TMAC2503 Mechanical: Special Topics

Prerequisite TMAC2115. This course is designed to provide special instructions on new and emerging topics in mechanical technology that are not otherwise covered in this curriculum. Topics for this course will be determined by the industry, the technology and the equipment to which the students are exposed. This instruction is designed to provide the student with the knowledge and skills to diagnose and repair complex mechanical malfunctions.

TMAT1003 Technical Mathematics

Prerequisite: MATH 0903 or required placement score. Designed for students in occupational and technical programs, this course includes measurement, operations with polynomial expressions, use of equations and formulas, systems of linear equations, basic geometry, basic trigonometry, and basic statistics, with emphasis on industrial and other practical applications. This course requires a calculator capable of doing arithmetic with fractions.

Italian

ITAL1014 Beginning Italian I

Emphasis on conversation; introduction to basic grammar, reading, writing, and culture.

ITAL1024 Beginning Italian II

Continued emphasis on conversation and fundamental language skills.

ITAL2014 Intermediate Italian I

Prerequisite: Beginning Italian II (ITAL1024) or equivalent. Instruction designed to develop communication skills and knowledge of grammar, reading, writing, and culture.

ITAL2024 Intermediate Italian II

Prerequisite: Intermediate Italian I (ITAL2014) or equivalent. Instruction designed to enhance communication skills and knowledge of grammar, reading, writing, and culture.

Japanese

JPN1014 Beginning Japanese I

No prerequisite. Introduction to the oral and written forms of the Japanese language.

JPN1024 Beginning Japanese II

Prerequisite: JPN1014 or equivalent. A continuation of JPN1014.

JPN2014 Intermediate Japanese I

Prerequisite: JPN1014 or equivalent. Instruction designed to develop greater facility in fundamental skills. Four hours of classroom instruction.

JPN2024 Intermediate Japanese II

Prerequisite: JPN2014 or equivalent. A continuation of JPN2014. Four hours of classroom instruction.

JPN3003 Conversation and Composition I

Prerequisite: JPN2024 or equivalent. Further study of Japanese. concentrating on grammar, reading, comprehension, essays, conversation, and kanji.

JPN3113 Culture and Civilization

Prerequisite: JPN2024 or equivalent. Study of the economic, political, and social structure of Japan and an introduction to Japanese history and culture.

JPN4283 Seminar: Japanese Language and Culture

Prerequisite: JPN3003 or equivalent. Specialized studies in Japanese literature, art, or social customs.

JPN(FR, GER, SPAN)4901-3 Foreign Language Internship

Prerequisites: Advanced foreign language proficiency; permission of the instructor and the department head. The Foreign Language Internship is intended primarily for majors in foreign languages or international studies. It is designed to provide outstanding students the opportunity to perfect their language proficiency and to acquire specific training and skills overseas. The overseas sponsor and the foreign language instructor of record will supervise the intern. Performance evaluations and a research paper will be required.

Journalism

JOUR(ART)1163 Basic Photography

A study of the use of the camera, films, equipment, and the basics of black and white processing and printing. Includes introduction to lighting techniques, composition, and color photography.

JOUR18111821 Broadcast Practicum

Practical work experience in the studios of KXRJFM and Tech television productions. Only four hours count for the journalism major.

JOUR2133 Introduction to Mass Communication

An introduction to the mass communication process and industry.

JOUR2143 News Writing

A study of and practice in writing news stories.

JOUR2153 Introduction to Radio and Television

A study of the technical, legal, programming, advertising and journalistic aspects of broadcasting with practical exercises in writing and announcing.

JOUR (ENGL)2173 Introduction to Film

Prerequisite: ENGL1013 or equivalent. A study of film as an art form with particular attention to genres, stylistic technique and film's relation to popular culture. JOUR2173 may be used to fulfill the fine arts General Education requirement. JOUR2173 may not be repeated for credit after the completion of ENGL2173.

JOUR28112821 Broadcast Practicum

Practical work experience in the studios of KXRJFM and Tech television productions. Only four hours count for the journalism major.

JOUR31113121 Editorial Conference

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Student news executives meet regularly with faculty to critique publication and broadcast products.

JOUR3114 News Editing

Prerequisite: JOUR2143, 3143. A study of copy reading, headline writing, makeup, and problems and policies of editing the news. Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory arranged.

JOUR3133 Publications Management

An analysis of the problems in managing newspapers, magazines and other mass media.

JOUR3143 News Reporting

Prerequisite: ENGL1013 or 1043. A study of news gathering and writing techniques.

JOUR3153 Feature Writing

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. A study of and practice in writing of newspaper features and magazine articles.

JOUR3163 News Photography

Prerequisite: ENGL1013 or 1043. A study of the use of the camera, communication through pictures, news value in pictures, and the history of photojournalism.

JOUR3173 Public Relations Principles

A study of public opinion and the role of the mass media in shaping it, including practice in public opinion research, communications techniques and solving public relations problems.

JOUR3183 Broadcast News Writing

Prerequisite: JOUR2143 or 3143. Principles and techniques of writing and production of radio and television news. Two hour class, two hour laboratory.

JOUR3193 Television News Production

Prerequisite: JOUR2143 or 3143 or consent of instructor. Study and practice in directing and producing television news programs, including experience in announcing, preparing scripts and video tape, and operating cameras and other studio equipment. One hour lecture, three hours laboratory.

JOUR38113821 Broadcast Practicum

Practical work experience in the studios of KXRJFM and Tech television productions, including work as manager, producer, or director. Only four hours count for the journalism major

JOUR40113 Practical Editing

Actual experience editing news. Arranged with an instructor. May be taken for a maximum of three hours.

JOUR4033 Community Journalism

A study of journalism as practiced in weeklies, small dailies, and broadcast stations in small towns and cities, including the relationship of the media to the community. For majors and non-majors.

JOUR4053 Mass Communication Seminar

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Studies of the relationship of mass communication to social, political, technical, and economic issues. Course content will vary. May be repeated for credit as JOUR4053 or 5053 when course content changes.

JOUR4083 New Communication Technology

A study of and practice in the use of the developing technology in mass communication, including the social, legal, and economic effects.

JOUR4091-4 Internship

Credit for work in professional journalistic settings. Credit hours will be based on hours on the job. May be taken for a total of four hours.

JOUR41114121 Editorial Conference

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Student news executives meet regularly with faculty to critique publication and broadcast product.

JOUR4113 History of American Journalism

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. A survey of the history of American journalism and mass media and their relationships to technical, economic, political, and other aspects of American society. May not be repeated for credit as JOUR 5113.

JOUR4123 Laws of Communications

A study of the development of freedom of press and speech, laws of libel, contempt, privacy and copyright in their relation to press, radio, television, and films.

JOUR4133 Television Program Production

Prerequisite: JOUR3183 or 3193 or consent of instructor. Study and practice in writing, editing, and producing dramatic, musical and documentary programs for television, including experience in writing and editing scripts, making and editing videotape, and operating cameras and other studio equipment for nonnews programs, with each student producing a program during the semester. One hour class, three hours laboratory.

JOUR4143 Advanced Reporting

Prerequisites: JOUR2143 and 3143 or permission of instructor. Study of advanced news gathering techniques and practice in researching and writing difficult types of stories.

JOUR4153 Editorial, Column, and Review Writing

Study of and practice in writing editorials, columns, and reviews. Includes research and discussion of the function of opinion writing in the mass media.

JOUR(ART)4163 Advanced Photography and Video

Prerequisite: JOUR(ART)1163 or JOUR3163 or consent of instructor. An introduction to advanced photographic techniques, including color film processing, digital photography and nonlinear editing. Various historic and current theories of visual journalism provide a substantive base for the application of techniques.

JOUR4173 Public Relations Project

Planning, preparation and execution of a public relations program for a specific project.

JOUR4193 Communication Research Methods

Introduction to the methodologies of behavioral science applied to communication research including design, measurement, data collection, and analysis. Explores the use of surveys, content analysis, focus groups, and experiments in studies of communication processes and effects.

JOUR4243 Journalism Writing Seminar

A concentrated fundamentals writing course that deals with traditional techniques and various formats for journalistic writing such as editorials, feature stories, columns, reporting, press releases, and interviews.

JOUR48114821 Broadcast Practicum

Practical work experience in the studios of KXRJFM and Tech television productions, including work as manager, producer, or director. Only four hours count for the journalism major.

JOUR49914 Special Problems in Journalism

This course, for majors only, requires advanced approval by the instructor and is restricted to second semester juniors and seniors. It is designed to provide certain advanced students with further concentration in a particular area. One, two, three, or four hours may be taken as appropriate.

Latin

LAT1013 Beginning Latin I

Instruction in the fundamentals necessary to read and write the language. Advanced placement and credit by examination are available to students who have previously studied Latin.

LAT1023 Beginning Latin II

A continuation of LAT1013.

LAT2013 Intermediate Latin I

Prerequisite: LAT1023 or equivalent. A study designed to continue the development of fundamental skills and to give a general reading knowledge of Latin and acquaintance with classical Latin literature, history, and philosophy.

LAT2023 Intermediate Latin II

A continuation of LAT2013.

LAT(GRK)3001 Greek and Latin Scientific Terminology

The course is designed to assist students with their understanding of English words which have their roots in Greek or Latin. Students who in their course of study need to know specialized vocabulary, such as science, math, pre-med, pre-law and nursing majors, will find this course extremely helpful.

Library Media

LBMD2001 Introduction to Library Resources

An introduction to the organization and function of resource collections, with practical experience in location, retrieval, and use of reference and research materials; emphasis placed on subject materials. Course will not count toward licensure.

Management

(Additional prerequisites for 3000 and 4000level courses are listed in the School of Business section of this catalog.)

MGMT3003 Management and Organizational Behavior

Each semester. Basic principles of management and organizational behavior including planning, organizing, leading, controlling, staffing, decision making, ethics, interpersonal influence, and group behavior; conflict management; job design; and organizational change and development.

MGMT3013 Management Productivity Tools

Prerequisites: BUAD2003, BUAD2053, and MGMT3003. A course designed to provide students with advanced training in the use of information technology for solving business problems. Students will work in groups on a variety of projects and with a variety of tools.

MGMT3103 Production Management

Each semester. Prerequisites: BUAD2003, 2053, and MGMT3003. A study of the concepts and methods for economical planning and control of activities required for transforming a set of inputs into specified products or services. Emphasis is placed on the design of operations planning and control, quality control, inventory, maintenance, and product planning systems.

MGMT4013 Management Information Systems

Each semester. Prerequisites: BUAD2003, 2053, MGMT3003, and MKT3043. A study of information processing, the systems concept, the analysis and design of information systems, and database hardware and software technology as they apply to producing information to be used in business decision making. Emphasis will be given to practical application for business.

MGMT4023 Personnel/Human Resource Management

Prerequisite: MGMT3003. A study of that function performed in organizations which facilitates the most effective use of people (employees) to achieve organizational and individual goals. Topics covered include the law and personnel/human resource management, personnel analysis, planning, and staffing; performance evaluation and compensation, training and developing of human resources; labor relations, employee safety and health; work scheduling; evaluation of personnel/human resources management.

MGMT4033 Internship I in Management

Prerequisite: Permission of the Instructor, Department Head and Dean; Junior Standing; minimum 2.5 overall GPA. A supervised, practical experience providing undergraduate MGMK majors with a hands-on professional management/marketing experience in a position relating to an area of career interest. The student will work in a local cooperating business establishment under the supervision of a member of management of that firm. A School of Business faculty member will observe and consult with the students and the management of the cooperating firm periodically during the period of the internship. Students will be required to make oral reports in the classroom, maintain an internship log, and prepare a final term paper. Note: Only three hours of internship may be used to satisfy the curriculum requirements for management or marketing electives. Additional hours may be used to satisfy the curriculum requirements for general electives.

MGMT4043 Internship II in Management

Prerequisite: Internship I, permission of the Instructor, Department Head and Dean; Junior Standing; minimum 2.5 overall GPA. To be taken after completion of Internship I. A supervised, practical experience providing undergraduate MGMK majors with a hands-on professional management/marketing experience in a position relating to an area of career interest. The student will work in a local cooperating business establishment under the supervision of a member of management of that firm. A School of Business faculty member will observe and consult with the students and the management of the cooperating firm periodically during the period of the internship. Students will be required to make oral reports in the classroom, maintain an internship log, and prepare a final term paper. Note: Only three hours of internship may be used to satisfy the curriculum requirements for management or marketing electives. Additional hours may be used to satisfy the curriculum requirements for general electives.

MGMT4053 Small Business Management

Prerequisites: MGMT3003, MKT3043, and senior standing. Application of business management principles to the creation and operation of smallscale enterprises. Emphasis on the preparation and implementation of business plans for such enterprises.

MGMT4073 Special Topics in Management

Prerequisite: MGMT3003. In-depth exploration of selected management topics. The primary topic will vary from offering to offering; thus, the course may be taken more than once.

MGMT4083 Business Policy

Each semester. Prerequisites: Senior standing and completion of all junior-level School of Business core courses except FIN3063 and MGMT3103, which may be taken concurrently. As the capstone course in the School of Business core, this course examines the application of strategic management processes, including top management's role in situational analysis, strategy selection, strategy implementation, and strategic control, under conditions of uncertainty.

MGMT4093 Human Behavior in Organizations

Prerequisite: MGMT3003. A study of individual and group behavior in organizations. Topics covered include personality and individual differences, personal systems, values and ethics, perception, attribution theory, goal setting, reinforcement theory, theories of motivation and leadership, group systems, power and social influence, and organizational structure.

Marketing

(Additional prerequisites for 3000 and 4000level courses are listed in the School of Business section of this catalog.)

MKT3043 Principles of Marketing

Each semester. Marketing fundamentals, the ultimate consumer, the retailing and wholesaling systems, marketing functions, marketing policies, marketing costs, critical appraisal of marketing, marketing and the government.

MKT3163 Consumer Behavior

Prerequisite: MKT3043. A study of the development of consumer decision making processes and the factors which influence them. Psychological, sociological, economic, cultural, and situational factors are examined. Their impact on marketing formulation, both domestic and international, is emphasized.

MKT4033 Internship in Marketing I

Prerequisite: Permission of the Instructor, Department Head and Dean; Junior Standing; minimum 2.5 overall GPA. A supervised, practical experience providing undergraduate MGMK majors with a hands-on professional management/marketing experience in a position relating to an area of career interest. The student will work in a local cooperating business establishment under the supervision of a member of management of that firm. A School of Business faculty member will observe and consult with the students and the management of the cooperating firm periodically during the period of the internship. Students will be required to make oral reports in the classroom, maintain an internship log, and prepare a final term paper. Note: Only three hours of internship may be used to satisfy the curriculum requirements for management or marketing electives. Additional hours may be used to satisfy the curriculum requirements for general electives.

MKT4043 Internship II in Marketing

Prerequisite: Internship I, permission of the instructor, Department Head and Dean; Junior Standing; minimum 2.5 overall GPA. To be taken following completion of Internship I. A supervised, practical experience providing undergraduate MGMK majors with a hands-on professional management/marketing experience in a position relating to an area of career interest. The student will work in a local cooperating business establishment under the supervision of a member of management of that firm. A School of Business faculty member will observe and consult with the students and the management of the cooperating firm periodically during the period of the internship. Students will be required to make oral reports in the classroom, maintain an internship log, and prepare a final term paper. Note: Only three hours of internship may be used to satisfy the curriculum requirements for management or marketing electives. Additional hours may be used to satisfy the curriculum requirements for general electives.

MKT4063 Advertising

Prerequisite: MKT3043. The "how" and "why" of advertising: principal problems faced by advertisers and advertising agencies, approaches, policies, and procedures as related to successful marketing techniques.

MKT4073 Service Marketing Management

Prerequisite: MKT3043. The course offers an in-depth exploration of the differences between tangible goods and services, the problems created by those differences, and the ways in which marketing managers can overcome these problems. The primary focus of the course will be on differences in consumer evaluation processes between goods and services, and specific issues that marketers have to address when dealing with services.

MKT4093 International Marketing

Prerequisite: MKT3043. Analysis of opportunities, distinctive characteristics and emerging trends in foreign markets, including exploration of alternative methods and strategies for entering foreign markets; organizational planning and control; impact of social, cultural, economic and political differences; and problems of adapting American marketing concepts and methods.

MKT4103 Special Topics in Marketing

Prerequisite: MKT3043. In-depth exploration of selected marketing topics. The primary topic will vary from offering to offering, thus, the course may be taken more than once.

MKT4143 Marketing Management

Fall. Prerequisites: MKT3043, MGMT3003, MKT3163 and senior standing. Advanced study of decisions facing a marketing executive. Topics covered include product planning, consumer behavior, promotion, sales management, and pricing.

MKT4153 Marketing Research

Spring. Prerequisites: BUAD2053. MKT3043. A study of the development of the basic methodology in research design for primary and secondary data, including requirements for collection, analysis, editing, coding, and presentation of data to support marketing decisions.

Mathematics

MATH 0803 Beginning Algebra

Content of this course is as follows: the language of algebra, fundamental operations, signed numbers, equations and problem solving. The grade in the course will be computed in semester and cumulative grade point averages, but the course may not be used to satisfy general education requirements nor provide credit toward any degree. A student who makes a "D" or "F" in MATH 0803 must repeat the course in each subsequent semester until he or she earns a grade of "C" or better. Students who make a grade of "C" or better in MATH 0803 must enroll in MATH 0903 the following semester.

MATH 0903 Intermediate Algebra

Prerequisites: One unit of high school algebra, or MATH 0803, or consent of the department of mathematics. The purpose of this course is to prepare for collegelevel mathematics those students whose mathematics background is inadequate. Content of the course is fundamental operations, linear equations, special products and factoring, fractions, functions, graphs, and systems of linear equations. The grade in the course will be computed in semester and cumulative grade point averages, but the course may not be used to satisfy general education requirements nor provide credit toward any degree. A student who makes a "D" or "F" in MATH 0903 must repeat the course in each subsequent semester until he or she earns a grade of "C" or better. NOTE: A grade of "C" or better must be earned in the course used to satisfy the general education mathematics requirement.

MATH1103 Algebra for General Education

Prerequisite: Score of 19 or above on the mathematics portion of the Enhanced ACT, or score of 390 or above on the quantitative portion of SAT, or score of 59 or above on the COMPASS mathematics section, or grade of "C" or better in MATH 0903. Content of course will include data analysis through a study of regression equations, functions, including polynomial, rational, and exponential, variation, modeling, and systems of equations. May not be taken for credit after completion of MATH1113 or any higher level mathematics course.

MATH1113 College Algebra

Prerequisite: Score of 19 or above on the mathematics portion of the Enhanced ACT, or score of 390 or above on the quantitative portion of SAT, or score of 59 or above on the COMPASS mathematics section, or grade of "C" or better in MATH 0903. Exponents and radicals, introduction to quadratic equations, systems of equations involving quadratics, ratio, proportion, variation, progressions, the binomial theorem, inequalities, logarithms, and partial fractions. May not be taken for credit after completion of MATH2703 or any higher level mathematics course.

MATH1203 Plane Trigonometry

Corequisite: MATH1113. A study of the properties of the trigonometric functions and their graphs, solution of right and oblique triangles, formulas and identities, inverse functions, and trigonometric equations.

MATH1913 Precalculus

Prerequisites: High School Algebra I and II, Trigonometry, and a Math ACTE subscore of at least 19, or MATH1113 and MATH1203. This course is designed to provide additional mathematical background before enrolling in the calculus sequence.

MATH2033 Mathematical Concepts I

Prerequisite: MATH1113 or MATH1103. For elementary education majors. Elementary set theory, numeration systems, elementary number theory and the real number system.

MATH2043 Mathematical Concepts II

Prerequisite: MATH2033. For elementary education majors. A continuation of MATH2033, including a study of the elementary concepts of probability and statistics, and an informal study of geometry.

MATH2163 Introduction to Statistical Methods

Prerequisite: MATH1113 or 1103 or consent of the instructor. Descriptive statistics, random variables, probability and sampling distributions, estimation, hypothesis testing, regression, analysis of variance, nonparametric techniques. May not be taken for credit after completion of MATH3153.

MATH2183 Statistical Process Control

Prerequisite: MATH2163 or equivalent. This is a course in statistical process control using Deming's philosophy for the improvement of quality, productivity, and competitive position.

MATH2243 Calculus for Business and Economics

Prerequisite: Algebra I and algebra II in high school with grades of "C" or better and a score of 22 or higher on the mathematics portion of the ACTE examination, or MATH1113. An introduction to the concepts of differentiation and integration. Emphasis will be placed on applications of calculus in business, economics, accounting, social sciences, and life sciences. May not be taken for credit after completion of MATH2914 or equivalent.

MATH2703 Discrete Mathematics

Prerequisite: MATH1113. A study of graph theory, trees, combinatorics, logic, and Boolean Algebra.

MATH2914 Calculus I

Prerequisites: MATH1113 and MATH1203 or consent of instructor. This is the first of two courses covering the calculus of functions of a single variable. Duplicate credit for MATH2913 and MATH2914 will not be allowed.

MATH2924 Calculus II

Prerequisite: MATH2914 or equivalent. This is the second of two courses covering the calculus of functions of a single variable. Duplicate credit for MATH2933 and MATH2924 will not be allowed.

MATH2934 Calculus III

Prerequisite: MATH2924 or equivalent. This is the third course in the elementary calculus sequence. It covers the calculus of functions of several variables. Duplicate credit for MATH2943 and MATH2934 will not be allowed.

MATH2981-3 Special Topics in Mathematics

Prerequisite: Math ACTE score of 22 or higher, or MATH1113, or consent of instructor. This course will be offered on an "as-needed" basis to cover topics in mathematics that are not otherwise covered in the curriculum. The content and credit for this course will vary according to the interests and needs of the student. This course may be repeated for credit if the course content differs.

MATH3003 Foundations of Number Systems

Prerequisite: MATH2703. A brief review of elementary set theory, followed by the construction of the natural numbers, the integers, the rational numbers, the real numbers and the complex numbers accompanied by a development of the order and field properties.

MATH3033 Methods of Teaching Elementary Mathematics

Prerequisite: MATH2043. A course on methods of teaching the mathematics of the elementary school using mathematical concepts and principles taught in these grades.

MATH3123 College Geometry

Prerequisite: MATH2924. A formal approach to plane geometry with coordinates; sets, points, lines, planes, distance, and coordinate systems, angles, congruence, parallelism, and similarity.

MATH3153 Applied Statistics I

Prerequisite: MATH2924. A balanced approach emphasizing both theory and applications will be taken. Topics include descriptive statistics, exploratory data analysis, probability and probability models, discrete and continuous random variables, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, and control charts. Students will be required to collect data, use a current statistical software package to analyze the data, and make inferences based upon the data analysis as part of an individual and/or group project.

MATH3163 Mathematical Modeling I

Prerequisites: MATH2703 and MATH2943. This course provides an introduction to the mathematical modeling process and applies this process to problems that may be modeled with calculus or lower-level mathematics. Emphasis will be placed on connections of mathematics to application areas such as business, industry, economics, physical sciences, biological sciences, medicine, and social sciences.

MATH3203 Introduction to Analysis

Prerequisites: MATH2934 and MATH2703. A careful development of the real number system and the theory of calculus on the real line.

MATH3243 Differential Equations I

Corequisite: MATH2934. A study of the differential equations of the first order and first degree; linear equations, with constant coefficients; methods of undermined coefficients, operators, variations of parameter, and change of variable; equations of order one and higher degree, and special equations of order two.

MATH4003 Linear Algebra I

Prerequisite: MATH2924. Matrices and matrix algebra, systems of linear equations, determinants, eigenvalues, eigenvectors, general vector spaces, linear transformations.

MATH4033 Abstract Algebra I

Prerequisite: MATH2703. A study of groups and other algebraic structures, including sub-groups, normal sub-groups, quotient groups, abelian groups, groups of permutations, homomorphisms, kernel, and range.

MATH4103 Linear Algebra II

Prerequisite: MATH4003 or the consent of the Department of Mathematics. A continuation of MATH4003 with emphasis on abstract vector spaces, inner product spaces, linear transformations, kernel and range, and applications of linear algebra. MATH 5103 may not be taken for credit after completion of MATH4103 or equivalent.

MATH4113 History of Mathematics

Prerequisite: MATH2934. A study of selected topics from the history and nature of mathematics from ancient to modern times. Emphasis will be placed on the historical development of mathematics through a study of biographies of prominent mathematicians and the evolution of some important mathematical concepts. The fundamental role of mathematics in the rise, maintenance, and extension modern civilization will be considered. MATH 5113 may not be taken for credit after completion of this course.

MATH4133 Abstract Algebra II

Prerequisite: MATH4033. Groups, subgroups, homomorphisms, isomorphisms, complex numbers, finite groups.

MATH4153 Applied Statistics II

Prerequisite: MATH3153. This course is a continuation of MATH3153 with emphasis on experimental design, analysis of variance, and multiple regression analysis. Students will be required to design and carry out an experiment, use a current statistical software package to analyze the data, and make inferences based upon the analysis.

MATH4163 Mathematical Modeling II

Prerequisites: MATH3153, MATH3243 and MATH3163. This course is a continuation of MATH3163. Mathematical models studied in this course may require a knowledge of any area of mathematics normally included in an undergraduate curriculum. At least one model will be based on a problem that is given to the class by a representative from business or industry. Emphasis will be placed on connections of mathematics to application areas such as business, industry, economics, physical sciences, biological sciences, medicine, and social sciences.

MATH4173 Advanced Biostatistics

Prerequisite: An introductory statistics course or permission of instructor. This course will include analysis of variance, one factor experiments, experimental design with two or more factors, linear and multiple regression analysis, and categorical data analysis.

MATH4243 Differential Equations II

Prerequisites: MATH3243 and MATH4003 or consent of the instructor. A continuation of MATH3243 with emphasis on higher order and systems of differential equations.

MATH4253 Advanced Calculus I

Prerequisite: MATH3203. The real numbers, the topology of cartesian spaces and convergence of continuous functions.

MATH4263 Mathematical Statistics

Prerequisite: MATH3153. This is an introductory course in mathematical statistics. Topics include distribution functions (both discrete and continuous), multivariate distributions, distributions of functions of random variables, and statistical inference.

MATH4273 Complex Variables

Prerequisite: MATH2934. An introduction to complex variables. This course will emphasize the subject matter and skills needed for applications of complex variables in science, engineering, and mathematics. Topics will include complex numbers, analytic functions, elementary functions of a complex variable, mapping by elementary functions, integrals, series, residues and poles and conformal mapping. MATH 5273 may not be taken for credit after completion of this course.

MATH4283 Advanced Calculus II

Prerequisite: MATH4253. Differentiation, integration and infinite series.

MATH4293 Introductory Topology

Prerequisite: MATH4253. Metric spaces, topological spaces, mappings, limit point, continuity, connectedness, and compactness. MATH 5293 may not be taken for credit after completion of this course.

MATH4703 Special Methods in Mathematics

Prerequisites: SEED2002 and junior standing or permission of the instructor. This course, designed for prospective junior and senior high mathematics teachers, will provide the student with knowledge of current research and practice in mathematics education, a setting in which to apply that knowledge, and the opportunity to assess their teaching performance and formulate a plan for improvement.

MATH4772 Mathematics Teaching Practicum

A course designed to provide mathematics education majors with experience in teaching mathematics and assessing student performance.

MATH49914 Special Problems in Mathematics

The content and credit for this course will be designed to meet the needs of the student.

Medical Technology

(Medical Technology courses are offered at affiliated institutions.)

MEDT40123 Clinical Microscopy and Body Fluids

Use of the microscope in laboratory diagnostic procedures and introduction to body fluid chemistry, particularly blood, urine and spinal fluids. Emphasis on pathological conditions resulting from abnormal concentrations of substances.

MEDT4029 Hematology

Consideration of typical and atypical medical laboratory procedures in hematology with emphasis on principles, methodology, sources of error, and clinical application. Supervised training in standard and special laboratory techniques.

MEDT4035 Immunohematology

Consideration of typical and atypical medical laboratory procedures in immunohematology and bloodbanking with emphasis on principles, methodology sources of error, and clinical application. Supervised training in standard and special laboratory techniques.

MEDT40489 Clinical Chemistry and Instrumentation

Consideration of methods of determining chemical composition of body fluids and analysis using standard and special laboratory instruments. Study of design, construction, and operation of instruments such as balances, centrifuges, pH meters, autoanalyzers, nullbalances, others.

MEDT40567 Microbiology

Consideration of typical and atypical medical laboratory procedures in microbiology with emphasis on diagnostic medical bacteriology virology, and mycology. Supervised training in standard and special laboratory techniques.

MEDT4064 Parasitology

Consideration of typical and atypical medical laboratory procedures in parasitology with emphasis on methodology and clinical application. Supervised training in standard and special laboratory techniques.

MEDT4073 Serology

Consideration of typical and atypical medical laboratory procedures in serology with emphasis on methodology, sources of error, and clinical application. Supervised training in standard and special laboratory techniques.

MEDT40812 Special Topics

Subject matter may include the following: hospital orientation, laboratory management, radioisotope techniques, laboratory safety, special projects, special techniques, quality control procedures, and seminars on various subjects deemed necessary by hospital personnel.

Middle Level Education

MLED2001 Introduction to Education

Prerequisite: Stage I course and will be taken before admittance to the Middle Level Teacher Education Program. Introduction to philosophy of education and to the concept of education as a career with an emphasis on middle-level education. The format will include a weekly lecture and on-site field experiences in a public school setting.

MLED2011 History of Education

Prerequisite: Stage I course and will be taken before admittance to the Middle Level Teacher Education Program. The purpose of this course is to provide potential middle-level teachers with an overview of the social and historical aspect of the American Education System.

MLED3012 Research Foundations

Prerequisite: Admission of Stag II to the Middle Level Teacher Education Program. Presentation of the knowledge base and practice in the skills needed to locate educational research information; analyze, synthesize, and evaluate the complied materials; and write a professional research report based on the composite findings.

MLED3023: Nature and Needs of the Middle Level Student

Prerequisite: Admission to Stage II of the Middle Level Teacher Education Program. This course is an overview of the physical, social, emotional, intellectual, and moral development of early adolescents and the developmental implications on curriculum and instruction.

MLED3034: Literacy Development in the Middle Grades

Prerequisite: Admission to Stage II of the Middle Level Teacher Program. Presentation of the knowledge base and methodology needed to guide students in the middle grades toward competency and maturity as readers and writers.

MLED3041 Home-School Communication

Prerequisite: Admission to Stage II of the Middle Level Teacher Education Program. Presentation of methods of communication between the home and school for the classroom teacher will be explored. The use of classroom management software for school reports, student information sheets, newsletters, electronic mail, and letters to home as well as telephone skills will be practice.

MLED3051 School Law

Prerequisite: Admissions to Stage II of the Middle Level Education Program. Intensive on campus classroom exploration of the principles of curriculum instruction teaching methods, use of community resources and evaluation as related to teaching in middle level education.

MLED3062 Tests & Educational Measurements

Prerequisite: Admission to Stage II of the Middle Level Program. A survey of test theory with particular emphasis upon the use of assessment techniques in the middle level classroom as an educational decision-making tool.

MLED3071 Diversity in the Classroom

Prerequisite: Admission to Stage II of the Middle Level Teacher Education Program. A study of the major areas of exceptionalities including the learning disabled, mentally retarded, physically handicapped, and the gifted, and their special needs in a school program.

MLED3081 Instructional Technology

Prerequisite. Admission to Stage II of the Middle Level Teacher Education Program. This course is designed to familiarize Middle Level Education majors with a variety of non-print media resources available for supporting instruction. These include computer technology (including CD-ROM, video laser discs), educational computer software, telecommunications (including use of the Internet and the World Wide Web), instructional television, and other resources for preparation of instructional materials. A primary focus of this course is on utilizing resources which most effectively enhance the learning process. The concepts stressed in this course are research based.

MLED3092 Psychological Foundations

Prerequisite. Admission to Stage II of the Middle Level teacher education program. General principles of learning, the learner's potentialities with attention to individual differences, the environment of effective learning, application of psychology to educational problems.

MLED3102 Reading Through Literature in the Middle Ages

Prerequisite: Admission to Stage II of the Middle Level Teacher Education Program. A study of the development and source of literature for the middle childhood/early adolescent student. Emphasis will be on integrating literature across the curriculum and on methods of encouraging reading as a lifelong pleasurable pursuit.

MLED4004 Middle Level Curriculum and Pedagogy

Prerequisite: Admission to Stage II of the Middle Level Teacher Program. A study of the developmental curriculum, instruction and pedagogy for teaching the middle level student. Emphasis will be on an interdisciplinary approach to curriculum design.

MLED4012 Teaching Reading and Study Strategies in the Content Area

Prerequisite: Admission of Stage II of the Middle Level Teacher Education Program. Presentation of the knowledge base and practice in the teaching/learning strategies related to reading in all content area disciplines.

MLED4023 Guided Field Experiences

Prerequisite: Admission to Stage II of the Middle Level Teacher Education Program and concurrent enrollment in MLED4004 and MLED4012. MLED4023 Guided Field Experiences is a series of 45 hours of observation, participation, and teaching experiences ranging from individual to large group settings conducted in selected middle level settings designed to prepare the teacher candidate for a smooth transition to internship in a clinical setting.

MLED4912 Internship

(Twelve hour course.) Prerequisites: Admission to Stage III and Internship. MLED4912 Internship is a minimum of fifteen weeks of reflective clinical internship at the middle level. In a select setting under supervision of experienced middle level professionals, teacher candidates will prepare, facilitate, and evaluate an appropriate curriculum experience for instruction of the early adolescent. Fee $100.00.

Middle Level Mathematics and Science

MLMS4406 Integrating Mathematics and Science in Middle School Education

Prerequisite: Admission to Stage II of the Middle Level Teacher Education Program. This course outlines methods, materials, and procedures for integrating middle level mathematics and science education.

Military Science - ROTC

(For further information concerning military science courses, contact Captain Anthony Gortemiller at (479)498-6069.

MS1101 Leadership I

Fall. A study of the importance of communications, decision making, and the understanding of human behavior as it affects leadership situations. Includes introduction to basic military skills.

MS1111 Leadership II

Spring. Introduction to leadership and development and basic tactical skills. Includes introduction to basic military skills.

MS2312 Military Organization/Tactics I

Fall. Emphasis on the development of effective leadership skills, basic rifle marksmanship training, and on understanding how the leadership process works in organizational situations.

MS2402 Military Organization/Tactics II

Continuation of leadership development training from MS2312. Introduction to practical work in map reading, CPR course and basic lifesaving steps for first aid.

MS3503 Advanced Leadership and Tactics I

Fall. An in-depth study of unit tactics and related individual skills, advanced map reading and their practical application. Emphasis on person to person leadership skill development.

MS3603 Advanced Leadership and Tactics II

Spring. A continuation of MS3503.

MS4703 Applied Leadership and Management I

Fall. A study of command and staff functions and practical exercises in planning, organizing, and supervising. Students in this course plan and administer all activities of the cadet corps. Emphasis is placed on leadership and management of larger organizations.

MS4803 Applied Leadership and Management II

Spring. A continuation of MS4703.

Military Leadership Laboratory

Prerequisite: Enrollment in the appropriate level of the Military Science Program. Emphasis is on continued instruction and practical application of military fundamentals learned in the classroom. Course is designed to develop individual character, leadership abilities, and other attributes essential to an officer and a leader.

Museum

MUSM(ANTH)4403 Interpretation/Education through Museum Methods

Prerequisites: Senior or Graduate standing, or permission of instructor. Museum perspectives and approaches to care and interpretation of cultural resources, including interpretive techniques of exhibit and education-outreach materials, and integrating museum interpretation/education into public school and general public programming. Class projects focus on special problems for managing interpretive materials in a museum setting. Graduate level projects or papers involve carrying out research relevant to the Museum's mission and relating to current Museum goals.

Music

MUS1000, 3000 Recital Attendance

Offered on a pass/fail basis. Students are required to attend a specified number of recitals each semester and must pass at least six semesters to receive the B.A. degree in music or bachelor of music education.

MUS1241, 1251 Applied Voice/Italian Diction

Study of the rules of pronunciation for Italian lyric diction. Must be taken concurrently with MUS1231 for semesters 1 and 2 of Applied Voice.

MUS1321 Jazz Piano

Prerequisites: MUS1713, MUS1201 or 1441, or instructor approval. Materials and practices for typical jazz keyboard playing. One hour per week.

MUS1431 Class Piano

Nonmusic majors. For students who have little or no music reading skills, this course concentrates on basic piano skills while learning to read music. At the end of the course students will play pieces using a chordbased approach in several keys and styles.

MUS1441 Class Piano I, II, III, and IV

Music majors. A development of the fundamental skills of the piano, emphasizing those aspects most useful to nonpiano majors. A knowledge of chords is stressed, as is sight reading, improvising, playing in all keys and harmonizing melodies. The second year of class piano extends these skills adding the reading of multiple score parts, modulation, harmonizing with secondary chords, improvising in various composers' styles, playing a wide variety of literature, and accompanying.

MUS1481 Stringed Instruments

For music majors only. A study of instruments of the string family (violin, viola, cello, and string bass) with emphasis on the fundamentals of good tone production and bowing techniques to the extent that scales and grade one and two orchestra music can be played on selected instruments.

MUS1601, 3601, Orchestral Repertoire

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. A study of the landmarks of orchestral repertoire for winds and percussion sections through the preparation and rehearsal of the literature.

MUS1703 Music Fundamentals

Music fundamentals to be included are reading pitch and rhythm, basic notation, rudimentary music theory information about scales, harmony, dynamics, tempo; playing a melody instrument; rudimentary ear training, music composition, and music listening skills.

MUS1713, 1723 Theory I and II

To be taken concurrently with MUS1731, 1741. Study of scales, triads, seventh chords, diatonic harmonies, simple modulation. Introduction to small forms.

MUS1731, 1741 Ear Training I and II

The elements of music fundamentals, both written and aural. A prerequisite for all future work in music theory.

MUS2003 Introduction to Music

Prerequisite: None. An overall view of music history from Medieval to Contemporary times with a focus on relating musical happenings and concepts to the other arts.

MUS2201 Accompanying Seminar

For piano majors, or by permission of instructor. Development of basic accompanying techniques. Class coaching and presentation one hour weekly, plus assigned accompanying responsibilities in a variety of media. May be repeated three times.

MUS2241 Applied Voice/ German Diction

Study of the rules of pronunciation for German lyric diction. Must be taken concurrently with MUS1231 for semester 3 of Applied Voice.

MUS2251 Applied Voice/French Diction

Study of the rules of pronunciation for French lyric diction. Must be taken concurrently with MUS1231 for semester 4 of Applied Voice.

MUS2401 Woodwind Instruments

For vocal and keyboard music education majors. Sophomore standing recommended. This course is designed to give non-traditional music majors functional knowledge of the woodwind instruments.

MUS2421,2431 Woodwind Instruments

For music majors. A study of playing techniques and teaching techniques of the woodwind family (flute, oboe, clarinet, bassoon, and saxophone). Playing of selected instruments will be developed through major scales and grade one and two solos. Two hours weekly.

MUS2441 Class Voice

(Music majors). Fall. Development of basic vocal techniques through group participation and solo singing. Emphasis is placed on understanding of vocal pedagogy. Supervised practice two hours per week.

MUS2451 Class Voice

(Nonmusic majors). Fall. Development of basic vocal techniques through group participation and solo singing. Supervised practice two hours per week.

MUS2713, 2723 Theory III and IV

To be taken concurrently with MUS2731, 2741. More advanced harmonic concepts, modulation, chromatic harmonies. Further study of larger forms.

MUS2731, 2741 Ear Training III and IV

Further work in more advanced ear training and sight singing.

MUS3281 Secondary Instrumental Methods and Materials I

Laboratory experience in conducting and performance of materials appropriate to teaching band in the public school.

MUS3321 Practice of Improvisation

Prerequisite: successful completion of MUS3332 or instructor approval. Laboratory experience in improvisation in all jazz styles. This course may be repeated for credit.

MUS3322 Theory of Improvisation (Jazz)

Prerequisite: MUS1713, 1723, 1441, and/or instructor approval. Music theory, materials and practices for improvising or extemporaneous playing. Onehour class, twohour laboratory per week. May not be repeated for credit. May not be taken for credit after completion of MUS3332.

MUS3332 Theory of Improvisation (Jazz)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of MUS3322. Advanced music theory, materials and practices for improvising or extemporaneous playing. Onehour class, twohour laboratory per week. May not be repeated for credit.

MUS3401 Brass Instruments

For music majors. A study of the instruments of the brass family to the extent that scales and grade one and two solos can be played on selected instruments. Class two hours, practice two hours.

MUS3442 Piano Pedagogy

Spring. A study of pedagogical principles involved in the teaching of private and class piano, with emphasis on outside reading, class discussion, and observation of actual lessons and classes.

MUS3712 Counterpoint

Prerequisite: MUS2723. The contrapuntal techniques and forms of the Baroque era. Analysis of Canons, twoandthreepart Inventions, and fugues of J.S. Bach plus written exercises in twovoice counterpoint.

MUS3762 Orchestration

Prerequisite: 16 hours of theory or permission of instructor. A study of instrumentation and transposition with an introduction to scoring for band. Designed as a practical preparation for public school teachers.

MUS37712, 47712 Composition

Prerequisites: 16 hours of music theory and senior standing or consent of instructor. Offered as demand warrants. The study of basic compositional techniques of twentieth-century works and completion of composition project.

MUS3773 History of Music I

Fall. Prerequisite: MUS2723 (Theory IV) or permission of instructor. A study of Western Art music from ancient civilization to A.D. 1750.

MUS3783 History of Music II

Prerequisite: MUS2723 or permission of instructor. A study of classical and 19th century music.

MUS3793 History of Music III

Prerequisite: MUS2723 or permission of instructor. A study of 20th century music. Includes one unit of non-western music.

MUS3802 Principles of Conducting

Fall. Principles and practices of conducting; a study of music terminology and transpositions; development of baton techniques based on the practice of outstanding choral and instrumental conductors.

MUS3821 Secondary Choral Methods and Materials I

Choral conducting techniques, tone and diction styles and interpretation, rehearsal techniques, programs and concerts, planning and organization, and service information. Conducting of student ensembles and organizations. Methods and materials I will include review of literature for large and small ensembles appropriate for middle school, junior high, and smaller high school teaching situations.

MUS3843 Music in the Elementary Classroom I

Prerequisite: Admission to Stage II of the teacher education program. Fundamentals of music, listening, group singing, the reading of music, terminology, introduction to the keyboard. Designed to familiarize the student with singing and listening materials which contribute to the musical growth of the child; methods of successful music teaching for the elementary classroom teacher. This course may not be taken for credit by music majors.

MUS3853 Music in the Elementary Classroom II

Prerequisites: EDFD2003 and admission to Stage II of the teacher education program. A study of current practices, methods, and materials for teaching general music to elementary school children with emphasis on curriculum development.

MUS4001 Senior Recital

Prerequisite: Six semesters of major applied study. Required of all music and music education majors. Pass/fail basis.

MUS4201 Accompanying Seminar

Prerequisite: Four semesters of MUS2201 and/or permission of instructor. Advanced accompanying techniques for piano majors. Class coaching and presentation one hour weekly, plus assigned responsibilities in a variety of media. May be repeated three times. May substitute for required 3000 level hour of major ensemble enrollment with assignment by instructor to successfully accompany major ensemble or recital.

MUS4281 Secondary Instrumental Methods and Materials II

Laboratory experience in conducting and performance of materials appropriate to teaching band in the public school.

MUS4461 Percussion Instruments

For music majors. A study of the instruments of the percussion family to the extent that scales and/or rudiments and grade one and two solos can be played on selected instruments. Designed as a practical preparation for public school teachers. Two hours weekly.

MUS4701 Special Methods in Music

Prerequisites: Admission to student teaching phase of the teacher education program and concurrent enrollment in SEED4809. Intensive oncampus exploration of the principles of curriculum construction, teaching methods, use of community resources, and evaluation as related to teaching music.

MUS4712 Form and Analysis

Fall. Prerequisite: MUS2723. A study of the standard forms of the Classical period with emphasis on instrumental forms and genres developed in the period 17501825 and the continuation and expansion of those forms in the nineteenth century.

MUS4803 History of American Music: Jazz and Folk

An in-depth study of folk music and the relationship between these forms and American life. Research, aural activity, and analysis are used to explore a variety of musical forms, composers, and performers.

MUS4811 Keyboard Literature

Fall. A survey of piano or organ literature with emphasis on historical development, analysis of selected compositions, and listings of suitable pedagogical materials.

MUS4821 Secondary Choral Methods and Materials II

Choral conducting techniques, tone and diction styles and interpretation, rehearsal techniques, programs and concerts, planning and organization, and service information. Conducting of student ensembles and organizations. Methods and materials II will include a review of historically important choral works and the music of the master composers of each musical epoch. Sight singing methods for group sight reading will be reviewed.

MUS4832 Vocal Solo Literature/Pedagogy

Spring. Prerequisite: Junior standing. Introduction to and comparison of vocal solo literature and the teaching of vocal technique.

MUS48813 Workshops in Music

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Course with variable credit designed to meet specific needs of participants. Each credit hour will require fifteen clock hours of instruction.

MUS4972 Marching Band Techniques

Fall. For music majors only. A study of the problems, practices, techniques, and the organization and administration of the marching band.

MUS49914 Special Problems in Music

Prerequisites: Senior standing and permission of the instructor. Additional work in an area of the student's choice under the direction of the faculty member competent in that area.

Musical Performance

Musical performance includes private study, class piano, class voice, and ensembles. In numbering applied music courses, the first digit, numeral 1, is used for freshman and sophomore level courses; the numeral 3 for junior and seniorlevel courses. The second and third digits indicate applied concentration area (e.g. 20 = piano) and the final digit indicates hours of semester credit.

Applied Music (private instruction) is required of all music majors; each course may be repeated three times. Applied music students may be assigned participation in designated ensembles in addition to required ensembles. Ensembles are given in the curricula in Music and Music Education.

Eight hours of credit may be obtained at the freshman and sophomore level in any applied area; 812 hours may be obtained at the junior and senior level. To qualify for three hours per semester, a student must have a minimum 3.50 cumulative GPA in applied music, a 3.00 cumulative GPA in total hours, junior standing and recommendation of the instructor.

MUS 112, 313, Applied Music. Use appropriate numbers to indicate applied study area.

Trumpet 10012,30013

Violin 11012,31013

French Horn 10112,30113

Viola 1111-2,31113

Trombone 10212,30213

Cello 11212,31213

Euphonium 10312,30313

String Bass 11312,31313

Tuba 10412,30413

Percussion 11412,31413

Clarinet 10512,30513

Piano 12012,32013

Oboe 10612,30613

Harpsichord 12112,32113

Flute 10712,30713

Organ 12212,32213

Saxophone 10812,30813

Voice 12312,32313

Bassoon 10912,30913

Music Ensembles

In numbering ensemble courses, the first digit, numeral 1, is used for freshman and sophomore level courses, the numeral 3 for junior and seniorlevel courses. The two middle digits are used for ensemble identification. Each listing (e.g., 1501 and 3501) for Band) may be repeated three times.

MUS1301, 3301 Opera Workshop

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. The course of study will involve selected scenes from standard opera literature prepared for dramatic presentation. Research will be required pertaining to the historical setting, appropriate costumes, and mannerisms of the period being studied. Staging techniques and set building will be included as deemed necessary to each presentation.

MUS1311, 3311 Jazz Ensemble

Membership selected by audition. Study and performance of big band jazz styles from the 1930's to present. Rehearsal two hours weekly.

MUS1501, 3501 Band

Open to students who can satisfy audition requirements. Marching Band, fall semester, or permission of instructor is a prerequisite for Concert Band, spring semester. Fall semester stresses marching band and one major concert performance. Spring semester stresses symphonic and concert bands in the study and performance of quality literature. Four hours weekly.

MUS1511, 3511 Brass Choir

Membership selected by audition. Study and performance of representative brass literature. Rehearsal 3 hours weekly.

MUS1521, 3521 Woodwind Ensembles

Open to all students. Membership selected by audition. Two hours weekly.

MUS1531, 3531 Brass Ensembles

Open to all students. Membership selected by audition. Two hours weekly.

MUS1541, 3541 Percussion Ensembles

Open to all students. Membership selected by audition. Two hours weekly.

MUS1551, 3551 String Ensembles

Open to all students. Membership selected by audition. Two hours weekly.

MUS1571, 3571 University Choir

Open to all students. A select vocal group of approximately sixty members selected by audition. Study and performance of choral literature of all periods. Three hours weekly.

MUS1581, 3581 Chamber Choir

Open to all students by audition. A select choral ensemble of approximately sixteen voices specializing in the performance of chamber choral music from all historical periods. Two or three concerts are presented on campus each semester. Off-campus performances include tours and public relations functions for the university. Three hours weekly.

MUS1591, 3591 Small Vocal Ensembles

Open to all students. Participation in the various ensemble groups such as trios and quartets: study of selected music literature. Membership selected by audition. Two hours weekly.

MUS1611, 3611 Music Theatre Workshop

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Selected songs from standard musical theatre literature will be prepared for public performance with an emphasis on popular professional performance techniques. Credit will be given for one leading part or for a series of supporting parts. Two hours weekly. Each course may be repeated 3 times for credit.

MUS1621, 3621 Music Theatre Practicum

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Credit will be given for participation that results in a public performance of a major production. Vocal, instrumental, and/or audiovisual technological participation will be accepted. A minimum of28 hours participation is required. Each course may be repeated 3 times for credit.

MUS1671, 3671 University-Community Choir

Evening rehearsals. Open to all students and other interested persons. Assignments made on the basis of voice classification. Study and performance of choral literature of all historical periods. One and onehalf hours weekly.

MUS1681, 3681 Concert Chorale

Open to all students by audition. A select choral ensemble of approximately forty voices performing choral music from all historical periods. Two or three major concerts are presented each semester. Four hours weekly.

MUS4581 Vocal Ensembles

Summer. Membership selected by audition. Study and performance of representative vocal literature. Ensembles may be small ensembles such as trios or quartets, or may be large ensembles such as choir or chamber choir. Six hours weekly.

Nursing

NUR1001 Orientation to Nursing

Fall. A one hour elective course for students interested in pursuing nursing as a professional career. The student is introduced to the history of nursing, issues and trends, basic nursing education, advanced education for nurses, and nursing career opportunities. Students interested in nursing or a career in science are encouraged to take this course during the fall semester of their freshman year. Lecture 1 hour.

NUR2023 Introduction to Professional Nursing

Summer prior to Junior year. Prerequisite: Permission of Admission and Progression Committee. A nonclinical, threehour course which introduces the student to selected basic concepts in professional nursing. Purpose of the course is to introduce nursing concepts to nursing majors. The course focuses on nursing as a caring profession, nurses' roles and functions, ethics, standards, legal aspects, holism, wellness, health care settings, communication, teaching/learning, critical thinking, and the nursing process. The Conceptual Framework and Philosophy of Tech's Department of Nursing will be explored. Lecture 3 hours.

NUR2303 Nutrition

Principles of normal nutrition at all stages of the life cycle are emphasized. Growth and development needs are incorporated into the maintenance, restoration of nutritional health, and in the prevention of nutritional deficit. Exploration is conducted of the social, religious, and cultural factors which affect the family's nutritional health. Lecture 3 hours.

NUR3103 Nursing Skills I

Summer session prior to junior year. Prerequisite: Admission into upperlevel junior nursing courses. The course provides the student with theory and guided practice of basic psychomotor and math nursing skills in a multimedia simulated laboratory setting. $10 laboratory fee. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours equal to one credit hour.

NUR3204 Theories and Concepts in Nursing I

Fall, Prerequisite: Admission into upperlevel junior nursing courses. Corequisites: NUR3502 and 3404. This course is an introduction to the cognitive framework of the curriculum which emphasizes holistic man, environment, and nursing as an interacting system. The course focuses on biopsychosocial and spiritual behaviors as indicators of health throughout the life cycle. The nursing process and the scientific method of problem solving are presented as systematic approaches to nursing care. Further emphasis is placed on assessment of health needs and health practices of individuals in structured episodic health care settings. Beginning concepts of professionalism and care of clients with self-limiting alterations to health are integral parts of this course. Lecture 4 hours.

NUR3304 Health Assessment

Fall. Prerequisite: Departmental permission. The student uses the nursing process to assess the client by the utilization of observation, palpation, percussion, and auscultation skills. The language of Health Assessment is taught and methods of proper documentation are emphasized. The course provides guidance in specific assessment techniques and enables the student to recognize normal findings throughout the life cycle. The student collaborates with members of the healthcare team in the sharing of health findings in order to make a specific nursing diagnosis. $10 laboratory fee. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours equal to one credit hour.

NUR3404 Practicum in Nursing I - Nursing the Individual Client

Prerequisite: Admission to upper level junior nursing courses. Practicum facilitating the integration, synthesis, and application of theories, concepts, and psychomotor nursing skills taught in NUR3103, 3204, 3304 and 3502. The student uses maintenance nursing behaviors to assist individuals to reach functional adaptation. 12 Clinical hours equal to 4 credit hours. $10 laboratory fee.

NUR3502 Nursing Skills II

Fall. Prerequisites: NUR3103. A continuation of NUR3103. A guided practice of intermediatelevel theory and skills in a multimedia simulation laboratory. $10 laboratory fee. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 3 hours equal to one credit hour.

NUR3606 Theories and Concepts in Nursing II

Spring. Prerequisites: NUR3204, 3304, 3404, 3502. This course, utilizing the nursing process, builds upon NUR3204 and includes the biopsychosocial and spiritual needs of the family. The course emphasizes family development, the childbearing experience, and the child's unique response to the internal and external environment. Lecture 6 hours.

NUR3703 Nursing Pharmacology

Spring. Prerequisites: NUR3204, 3304, 3404, 3502. This course focuses on the relationships between the action of drugs, their effects and the contraindications for their administration. The relationship between specific patient needs and the type of drugs that would be effective to meet that need will be analyzed. The nursing care related each type of drug and the rationales for the care will be included. Lecture 3 hours.

NUR(BIOL)3803 Applied Pathophysiology

Each semester. Prerequisites: BIOL2014 and BIOL3074. This course focuses on the mechanisms and concepts of selected pathological disturbances in the human body. Emphasis is placed on how the specific pathological condition effects the functioning of the system involved, as well as its impact on all other body systems. Lecture 3 hours.

NUR3805 Practicum in Nursing II - Nursing the Family

Spring. Pre or corequisites: NUR3103, 3204, 3304, 3404, 3502, 3606 and 3703. A practicum course which facilitates the integration, synthesis, and application of the theories, concepts, and skills taught in NUR3103, NUR3502, NUR3606 and NUR3703. 15 clinical hours equal to 5 credit hours.

NUR4201 RN (Registered Nurse) Seminar

Summer prior to senior year. Prerequisite: RN licensure. This nonclinical course is required only for the returning registered nurse student. It provides the student with the opportunity to expand and improve knowledge in a carefully selected topic of relevance to nursing and/or health care. The course provides the student with a focus on professional nursing concepts and serves as a professional socialization course. General demand will play a part in the topics offered. May be repeated for credit if course content differs. Lecture 1 hour.

NUR4202 Selected Topics

Prerequisite: Departmental permission. This course is designed to offer a selection of topics which will meet student needs and interests. It can be taken anytime after successful completion of Levels I and II. The course provides the student with the opportunity to expand and improve knowledge in a carefully selected topic of relevance to nursing and/or health care. General demand will play a part in the topics offered. May be repeated for credit if course content differs. Lecture 2 hours.

NUR4206 Theories and Concepts in Nursing III

Fall. Prerequisite: NUR3606, 3703, 3805. The course focuses on the prevention of illness, maintenance of health and the restoration of wellness in the care of clients and families experiencing major dysfunctions in adaptation. The nursing process is the methodology used to assist clients and families toward achieving optimal health. Principles of growth and development throughout the life cycle, utilization of research findings, principles of communication in crisis, and the role of the nurse in crises situations are included in the course. Psychosocial theories and concepts relevant to the care of the emotionally disturbed client and family are explored in depth. Lecture 6 hours.

NUR4303 Nursing Research

Prerequisite: NUR3606, 3703, and 3805. An introductory research course which focuses on evaluating the validity and applicability of research findings for nursing practice. Emphasis is on scientific inquiry and the use of research findings to improve the quality of patient care. Lecture 3 hours.

NUR4405 Practicum in Nursing III - Nursing Clients in Crisis

Fall. Pre or co-requisites: NUR3103, 3304, 3502, 3606, 3703, 3805, 4202, 4206, and 4303. This is a clinical nursing course which provides the opportunity for the integration of theories and concepts in the application of the nursing process in the care of the emotionally and/or physically dysfunctional client, family or group who are undergoing adaptation difficulties due to major deviations from wellness. The health care is delivered according to scientific principles, research findings, and accepted standards of care. Nursing behaviors and nursing roles are emphasized which are appropriate to the level of the students. Learning experiences are gained through caring for clients. 15 clinical hours equal to 5 credit hours. $10 laboratory fee.

NUR4606 Theories and Concepts in Nursing IV

Spring. Prerequisites: NUR4202, 4206, 4303, and 4405. The course focuses on the prevention of illness, maintenance of health, and the restoration of wellness of individuals, families, and communities. Concepts of epidemiology, prevention, decision making, and collaboration are utilized to organize and deliver distributive nursing care in complex situations. Theories and techniques of management are studied which relate to self, team members, and care of groups of clients. The emerging role of the professional nurse is explored. Lecture 6 hours.

NUR4806 Practicum in Nursing IV - Nursing in the Community

Spring. Pre or corequisites: NUR4206, 4303, 4405, and 4606. A clinical course which integrates theories and concepts from all nursing courses and provisions for practice in predominantly distributive healthcare settings. Emphasis is on the utilization of the nursing process, the prevention of illness, maintenance of health, and the restoration of wellness of individuals, families, and communities, experiencing adaptation to complex health problems. Management skills and techniques are utilized in the delivery of holistic nursing care. Activities are provided which facilitate the role transition from student to professional nurse. Clinical experiences occur in a variety of distributive healthcare settings. 18 clinical hours equal to 6 credit hours. $10 laboratory fee.

NUR49914 Independent Study

Prerequisites: Departmental permission or NUR4303. Faculty and student collaborate on the selection, development, and evaluation of an individual project or topic in an area of nursing or health. 15 clock hours per credit hour.

Philosophy

PHIL2003 Introduction to Philosophy

A survey of basic problems in the major areas of epistemology, ethics, esthetics, philosophy of religion, and philosophical inquirymetaphysics.

PHIL2013 Religions of the World

An examination of the major historical religions according to their basic scripture, their historical development, and their contemporary ideas and practices.

PHIL3003 Ancient Philosophy

An examination of the thought of the leading philosophers of ancient Greece and Rome - the PreSocratics, Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, and representatives of the Stoic and Epicurean traditions.

PHIL3013 Modern Philosophy

A survey of the history of philosophical thought and its impact upon western civilization from the Renaissance to the twentieth century.

PHIL3023 Ethics

An introduction to the problems of formulating and validating principle definitive of "the good" in respect to ends, means, and norms of human behavior.

PHIL3033 Esthetics

An investigation of representative historical theories of beauty, the nature and social significance of art, standards of criticism, and epistemological aspects of the creative process.

PHIL3053 Philosophy of Religion

A consideration of historical and contemporary studies in religious thought - basic conceptions of the divine, the human engagement with the divine, and the nature and destiny of man within diverse eschatological perspectives.

PHIL3063 Political Philosophy

Analysis of the leading political theories evolved by mankind pertaining to the state. Emphasis on the view of such thinkers as Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Bentham, Mill, Marx and contemporary theorists.

PHIL3103 Logic

A study of the principles of deductive reasoning. Topics include immediate inference, the syllogism, truthfunctions, natural deduction, quantification, and fallacies.

PHIL3113 Contemporary Philosophy

A survey of some of the major philosophical trends of the twentieth century.

PHIL3203 Medieval Philosophy

Historical study of the main philosophical ideas of the period from St. Augustine to the Renaissance.

PHIL4053 Social Philosophy

A study of the historical development of social thought from the earliest times to the present.

PHIL4093 American Philosophy

An examination of the main currents of American philosophical and religious thought from the earliest times to the present.

PHIL4103 Advanced Logic

Prerequisite: PHIL3103. A study of selected topics in advanced logic. Emphasis will be placed on proof theory, quantification theory, semantic tableaux, logicism, theories of completeness and consistency, and some consideration of the logical foundations mathematics.

PHIL49914 Special Problems In Philosophy

A course for minors only. Students are accepted only by invitation of the instructor.

Physical Education

Activities

The activities service program of the Department of Health and Physical Education is designed for the individual who is not majoring in health and physical education. The courses are designed to develop physical skills, physical fitness, and aesthetic value for movement and experience, and to learn the rules and strategy of the activities.

Students enrolled in activity classes must furnish their own clothing for the class. The proper dress attire for the class will be shirts, shorts, and gym shoes. Students enrolled in the swimming classes must furnish their own swim suits. Students enrolled in scuba diving classes will pay an additional $75 fee which is used for equipment rental; students enrolled in bowling classes will pay a $62 bowling fee.

Team and Individual Activities for Women

PE1051 Volleyball

Designed for beginning volleyball players. The student will learn the fundamental skills, knowledge of the rules, and terminology associated with volleyball.

PE1411 Badminton

Designed for beginning badminton players. The student will learn the fundamental skills and a knowledge of the rules and terminology associated with badminton.

PE1481 Tennis

Constructed to aid the beginning tennis player to learn the fundamental skills for tennis. The student will gain a knowledge of the rules and strategy in tennis.

PE1931 Racquetball

Designed to introduce the rules and strategy of racquetball and development of the basic skills needed to play racquetball successfully.

Coeducational Activities

PE1101 Folk and Square Dance

Course content will include the origin and factors which influence development of folk and square dance. Basic steps, basic positions, and dance movements will be introduced to the students. May not be taken after completion of PE3591.

PE1121 Social Dance

Techniques of leading and following, basic positions, and a variety of dance steps will be introduced throughout the course. May not be taken after completion of PE3631.

PE1401 Archery and Recreational Games

The student will learn the fundamental skills in archery, including care and selection of archery tackle. Recreational games will include table tennis, giant volleyball, threeway volleyball, box hockey, pin ball, scooter soccer, variety ball, indoor soccer, and horse shoes.

PE1431 Bowling

The bowling classes are structured for the beginning bowler. Fundamental skills and general bowling knowledge and etiquette will be introduced to the student. ($70 fee).

PE1901 Beginning Swimming

This course is designed for students who cannot swim 25 yards on front and 25 yards on back (any form), and/or students who are afraid of water. Introduction to various aquatic activities is included.

PE1911 Intermediate Swimming

Students who are comfortable in deep water and are able to swim 25 yards on front and 25 yards on back (any form) may enroll in this course. Application of intermediate skills through various forms of aquatic activities is included.

PE1991 Racquetball

Designed to introduce the rules and strategy of racquetball and develop the basic skills needed to play racquetball successfully

PE2301 Beginning Golf

Designed for individuals who wish to learn the basic fundamentals in golf. Course includes the fundamentals of the full swing and the fractional swing in golf. It also includes the knowledge of rules and courtesies of golf.

PE2861 Rhythmic Aerobic Activities

This course will include motor skills put to music, rope jumping, step aerobics, kickboxing, senior fitness, children's fitness, sport aerobics, sculpting, and aerobic dance activities.

PE2921 Water Safety Instructor

Prerequisite: PE1911 or equivalent skills. This course is designed to train and certify students as American Red Cross swim instructors.

PE2932 Lifeguard Training

Prerequisite PE1911 or equivalent skills. This course is designed to train students as lifeguards.

PE2941 Scuba Diving I

This course is designed to serve as an introduction to scuba. Course will include classroom work and laboratory (pool) practice. Student must provide mask, snorkel, fins, weight belt, and weights. ($75 fee for use of scuba equipment including tank, regulator, and alternate air source, submersible pressure gauge, depth gauge, underwater compass, buoyancy control device with automatic inflator, and air fills.)

PE2951 Scuba Diving II

Fall. Prerequisite: Open Water Diver certified or equivalent (see instructor for equivalency). This course will contain the advanced scuba skills set forth by the Professional Association of Diving Instructors (PADI). The course will include techniques for; diving at night, in limited visibility, in deeper waters, and underwater search and light salvage. Field trips (lake dives) are required for certification as an Advanced Open Water Diver. Students must provide all equipment. (See instructor for equipment list). ($50 fee includes certification processing and open water training.)

Team and Individual Activities for Men

PE1581 Tennis

Designed to provide for the development of tennis ball hitting skills for accuracy as well as the knowledge of rules and strategies typical of those who play and enjoy the game.

PE1841 Racquetball

Designed to introduce the rules and strategy of racquetball and develop the basic skills needed to play racquetball successfully.

PE1851 Tennis and Basketball

Designed for the average student. Fundamentals in basketball and tennis will be introduced along with knowledge of the rules and strategies of play.

Academic Courses for Physical Education

PE1201 Orientation to Health, Physical Education, and Wellness Science

This course provides an introduction to the HPE/WS curriculum, as it affects the student. Emphasis will be given to resources, services and opportunities available to the student through the University, which will help him or her grow as a professional.

PE2101 Methods of Teaching Team Activities

This course is designed to assist in preparing students to teach three team sports: soccer, softball and volleyball. Emphasis will be placed on various teaching methods and strategies for the sequencing of skills, the presentation of skills, skill drill, methods of evaluation, and game situations for teaching large groups.

PE2111 Methods of Teaching Individual Activities

Tennis, Badminton, and a variety of recreational and leisure activities. This course is designed to assist in preparing students to teach a variety of individual and dual activity units. Emphasis will be placed on various teaching methods and strategies for the sequencing of skills, the presentation of skills, skills drills, methods of evaluation, and game situations for teaching large groups.

PE2513 First Aid

Each semester. Standard and advanced course in first aid. This course includes CPR instruction.

PE2523 Foundations in Health and Physical Education

Fall semester. A study of history, philosophy, and principles of health and physical education in grades K12 as applied to each area.

PE2653 Anatomy and Physiology

Prerequisite: BIOL1014 or permission of instructor. The structure and function of the human body with emphasis on the bodily systems important to teachers and practitioners of wellness, fitness, and physical education.

PE3051 Methods of Teaching Fitness and Wellness Concepts

This course is designed to provide the student with knowledge needed to implement a sound fitness and wellness program that will yield the desired results. The emphasis is on teaching students how to take control of their own personal health and lifestyle habits so that they can make a deliberate effort to stay healthy and achieve the highest potential for well-being.

PE3101 Methods of Teaching Rhythmic and Gymnastic Movements

Methods and activities to develop rhythm, folk dance, and gymnastic skills related to teaching physical education. Laboratory two hours.

PE3103 Methods of Teaching Movement Patterns and Activities for Children

Prerequisite: Admission to Stage II or permission of instructor. Methods and activities to develop basic movement patterns, primary and lead-up game skills, and knowledge related to teaching elementary physical education. Lecture one hour, laboratory four hours.

PE3413 Coaching Theory

The course exposes students to the theory of coaching, relevant to athletics. Emphasis is placed on organization, management, and content involved in coaching a variety of sports.

PE3512 Coaching Strategies: Football & Baseball

Principles of coaching football and baseball, including off-season training programs, team organization, offense, defense, scouting, and use of visual aids. One hour lecture and one hour laboratory.

PE3522 Coaching Strategies: Basketball & Track and Field

Principles of in-season and off-season training programs and team organization for track and field. Additionally, the course is designed to provide a systematic process for teaching basketball skill development and team strategies. Emphasis on fundamental skills and drills, rules and evolution of the game, offensive and defensive strategies used by various successful coaches are introduced. Extensive use of floor demonstrations and video presentations enhance the course content. One hour lecture and one hour laboratory.

PE3532 Coaching Strategies: Softball and Volleyball

This course will offer information relative to the following topics for both volleyball and softball: in-season and off-season training programs, team organization, offense, defense, special situations, scouting, and use of visual aids. One hour lecture and one hour laboratory.

PE3573 Prevention and Care of Athletic Injuries

Fall. Prerequisites: PE2653, 3663. Development of techniques in prevention and treatment of athletic injuries.

PE3583 Methods and Materials in Physical Education and Recreation for Kindergarten and Elementary Grades

Prerequisite: PE3103. Each semester. Methods, materials, supervision, school problems, rhythmical activities, movements exploration, and group games for kindergarten and elementary teachers. Lecture two hours, laboratory two hours.

PE3603 Methods and Materials in Physical Education for Secondary Schools

A course in program planning and techniques of teaching physical education in the secondary schools, critical analysis of methods now in use in physical education, and criteria for evaluation of programs. Lecture two hours, laboratory two hours.

PE3661 Laboratory Experiences in Anatomy/Physiology and Kinesiology

Prerequisite: PE2653 or permission of department head. The laboratory experience supplements Anatomy/Physiology and Kinesiology by providing practical experiences which enable students to bridge the gap between theory and practice.

PE3663 Kinesiology

Prerequisite: PE2653. Study of human movement and the physical and physiological principles upon which it depends. Body mechanics, posture, motor efficiency and the influence of growth and development upon motor performance.

PE3711 Athletic Training Practicum I

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Supervised laboratory experience in athletic training. Specifically designed to assist students in understanding the assessment and evaluation of sports-related injuries.

PE3721 Athletic Training Practicum II

Prerequisite: PE3711. Supervised laboratory experience in athletic training. Specifically designed to teach students the proper selection and operation of therapeutic modalities in the treatment of common athletic injuries.

PE4033 Basic Exercise Physiology

Prerequisites: PE2653, 3663, and 3661, or permission of the instructor. Introduction to the basic effects of exercise on physiology of the systems of the body, and the principles of exercise prescriptions and programs.

PE4103 Principles and Methods of Adapted Physical Education

Principles and methods of teaching special students with various types of physical and mental disabilities which require adapting the learning process. May not be repeated for credit as PE 5103 or equivalent.

PE4513 Organization and Administration of Health and Physical Education

Spring. Organization and administration problems in grades K12 to be treated as a single administrative unit.

PE4523 Measurement and Evaluation in Health and Physical Education

Fall. Research methods, measurement, and evaluation in health, physical education, and recreation with an analysis of their practical application.

PE4701 Special Methods in Health and Physical Education

Prerequisites: Admission to student teaching phase of the teacher education program and concurrent enrollment in SEED4909. Intensive oncampus exploration of the principles of curriculum construction, teaching methods, use of community resources, and evaluation as related to teaching health and physical education.

PE4703 Advanced Athletic Training Techniques

Prerequisites: PE3711, 3721, 4711, 4721, 2653, 3663, and 3661. Development of advanced techniques in all areas of athletic training, including evaluation, treatment and rehabilitation, and emergency procedures.

PE4711 Athletic Training Practicum III

Prerequisite: PE3711 & PE3721. Supervised laboratory experience in athletic training. Specifically designed to teach students the theory and practical application of rehabilitation techniques in the sports medicine environment.

PE4721 Athletic Training Practicum IV

Prerequisites: PE3711, PE3721, & PE4711. Supervised laboratory experience in athletic training. Specifically designed to prepare students in the administration and organization aspects of athletic training.

PE49914 Special Problems in Health and Physical Education

Prerequisite: PE4523. Open to physical education majors and minors of outstanding ability Course content will include readings and research and the setting up and carrying out of a piece of research which will include review of literature, the problem, and conclusion.

Physical Science

PHSC1001 Orientation to Physical Science

Introduction to vital university affairs, departmental opportunities and curriculum, professions in physical sciences, and employment opportunities found in physical sciences. The course will also focus on helping the student develop study skills, career goals, practical experience in the use of library reference and research materials, and understanding the policies and information needed to enjoy a successful college career. All students majoring in programs within the Physical Sciences department are strongly encouraged to take this course during their first fall semester on the Arkansas Tech University campus. Lecture one hour.

PHSC(BIOL)1004 Principles of Environmental Science

This course is designed to bring the student to a basic but informed awareness of and responsible behavior toward our environment and the role of the human race therein. The content will include a study of the philosophical and scientific basis for the study of ecosystems and the environment, the nature of ecosystems, the techniques used to study the environment, the origin and development of current environmental problems, the interdisciplinary nature of environmental studies, the processes of critical thinking and problem solving, and the moral and ethical implications of environmentally-mandated decisions. Lecture three hours, Lab three hours. $10 laboratory fee.

PHSC1013 Introduction to Physical Science

Each semester. Prerequisite: A score of 19 or above on the mathematics section of the Enhanced ACT or completion of MATH 0903, Intermediate Algebra, with a grade of "C" or better. An introduction to the natural laws governing the physical world, with emphasis upon the discovery and development of these laws and their effect upon man. Specific topics are selected from disciplines of physics, chemistry, astronomy, geology, and meteorology. May not be taken for credit after completion of two laboratory courses in the physical science disciplines. Lecture three hours.

PHSC1021 Physical Science Laboratory

Each semester. To be taken concurrent with or following completion of PHSC1013. An introduction to laboratory experiences in the physical sciences, including physics, chemistry, earth sciences, and astronomy. Laboratory two hours. $10 laboratory fee.

PHSC1051 Observational Astronomy Laboratory

Upon demand. Corequisite: MATH1103 or MATH1113; Corequisite: PHSC1053 or consent of instructor. An introduction to astronomical observations and techniques. Students will have the opportunity to use telescopes at the ATU astronomical observatory (weather permitting) to make observations and collect scientific data for analysis. This course includes telescope orientation, constellation recognition, identifying celestial objects, and interpreting astronomical data. When taken concurrently with PHSC1053, this course satisfies the general education physical science laboratory requirement upon successful completion of both courses. Course PHSC1051 will run simultaneously with PHSC3051 and duplicate credit will not be allowed. Credit for PHSC3051 requires completion of an observational research project for upper division students, but is not required of students enrolled in PHSC1051. Laboratory 3 hours; 1 credit hour. $10 laboratory fee.

PHSC1053 Astronomy

Upon demand. Corequisite: MATH1103 or MATH1113 or equivalent or consent of instructor; Optional corequisite; PHSC1051. A study of our universe; constellations, celestial motions, tools and methods of astronomical observations, the solar system, properties of stars and the interstellar medium, the birth, life and death of stars, our Milky Way galaxy, dynamics of stellar systems and other galaxies, and cosmology. When taken concurrently with PHSC1051, satisfies general education physical science laboratory requirement upon successful completion of both courses. Course PHSC1053 will run simultaneously with PHSC3053 and duplicate credit will not be allowed. Credit for PHSC3053 requires completion of several assignments, a term paper and a research project for upper division students, but is not required of students enrolled in PHSC1053. Lecture three hours

PHSC(BIOL)3003 Science in Elementary and Middle School Education

Each semester. Prerequisites: Junior standing. Materials, methods, and procedures of teaching modern elementary science. Includes the development of invitations to inquiry in science and the application of modern science curriculum in the elementary and middle schools. Lecture three hours.

PHSC(BIOL)3013 Science Education in the Secondary School

Fall. Prerequisites: CHEM2124, PHYS2014 and 2024, and BIOL1114, 1124 and 1134. A course outlining methods, materials, and procedures for secondary science education. Curriculum development and planning skills utilizing various instructional media and inquiry methodology are emphasized. Design and execution of learning activities for a secondary school setting are required. Lecture three hours. $10 laboratory fee.

PHSC3033 Meteorology

Prerequisite: PHSC1013 or PHYS2014 or CHEM1114 or CHEM2124. A study of the weather, the physics of the atmosphere, and associated phenomena. Lecture three hours.

PHSC3051 Observational Astronomy Laboratory

Upon demand. Prerequisite: MATH1113; Corequisite: PHSC3053 or consent of instructor. An introduction to astronomical observations and techniques. Students will have the opportunity to use telescopes at the ATU astronomical observatory (weather permitting) to make observations and collect scientific data for analysis. This course includes telescope orientation, constellation recognition, identifying celestial objects, and interpreting astronomical data. When taken concurrently with PHSC3053, this course satisfies the general education physical science laboratory requirement upon successful completion of both courses. Credit for PHSC3051 requires completion of an observational research project for upper division students. Laboratory 3 hours; 1 credit hour. $10 laboratory fee.

PHSC3053 Astronomy

Upon demand. Prerequisite: MATH1113; Optional corequisite; PHSC3051 or consent of instructor. A study of our universe; constellations, celestial motions, tools and methods of astronomical observations, the solar system, properties of stars and the interstellar medium, the birth, life and death of stars, our Milky Way galaxy, dynamics of stellar systems and other galaxies, and cosmology. When taken concurrently with PHSC3051, satisfies general education physical science laboratory requirement upon successful completion of both courses. Credit for PHSC3053 requires completion of a term paper and a research project for upper division students. Duplicate credit for previously offered PHSC3043 is not allowed. Lecture three hours.

PHSC(BIOL)4003 History and Philosophy of Science

Prerequisite: a Sophomore-level science course (or higher). A course in the historical development and philosophical basis of modern science. May not be repeated for credit as PHSC (BIOL) 5003 or equivalent, Lecture two hours.

PHSC4701 Special Methods in Physical Science

Prerequisites: Admission to student teaching phase of the teacher education program and concurrent enrollment in SEED4909. Intensive oncampus exploration of the principles of curriculum construction, teaching methods, use of community resources, and evaluation as related to teaching physical science.

Physics

PHYS1114 Applied Physics

Fall. A survey of selected topics in physics. The "scientific method", mechanics, fluid mechanics, heat, electricity, sound, light, and nuclear radiation will be studied. May not be taken for credit after completion of PHYS2014, PHYS2024, PHYS2114, or PHYS2124. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours. $10 laboratory fee.

PHYS2014 Physical Principles I

Fall, and summer (upon demand). Prerequisite: A grade of C or better in MATH1113 or consent of the instructor. Open to freshmen. A broad survey course emphasizing the understanding of the principles of physics necessary for students not specifically interested in advanced work in physics, chemistry or engineering. Topics include mechanics, heat, sound, wave motion, and fluid mechanics. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours. $10 laboratory fee.

PHYS2024 Physical Principles II

Spring, and summer (upon demand). Prerequisite: PHYS2014 or permission of instructor. Continuation of PHYS2014, covering electricity and magnetism, light, relativity, particle physics, and quantum effects. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours. $10 laboratory fee.

PHYS2114 General Physics I

Fall. Pre or corequisite: MATH2924. Introductory mechanics, heat and thermodynamics, kinetic theory, and sound. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours. $10 laboratory fee.

PHYS2124 General Physics II

Spring. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor; pre or corequisite: MATH2934. Introductory electricity and magnetism, wave motion, optics, and elementary quantum concepts. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours. $10 laboratory fee.

PHYS3001, 3011 (PHYS4001, 4011) Colloquium

Upon demand. Prerequisite: Junior standing. Attendance required of students interested in physics concentration. Discussion of advanced topics in current physical theory. Student presentations are required. Lecturediscussion one hour.

PHYS3003 Optics

Upon demand. Prerequisite: PHYS2124 or consent of instructor. Introduction to geometrical and physical optics. Lecture two hours, laboratory two hours. $10 laboratory fee.

PHYS3023 Mechanics

Upon demand. Prerequisite: PHYS2114. Corequisite: MATH3243. The conservation laws. Euler's angles. Lagrange's and Hamilton's equations. Lecture three hours.

PHYS3033 (ENGR3523) Radiation Health Physics

Upon demand. Prerequisites: PHSC1013, PHYS2014 or CHEM2124. Theory and exercises in radiological monitoring techniques, neutron activation analysis, and environmental effects of nuclear reactors. Lecture three hours.

PHYS3133 Theory of Electricity and Magnetism

Upon demand. Prerequisite: PHYS2124. Gauss's law, potential, Laplace's and Poisson's equations in rectangular, cylindrical, and spherical coordinates, inductance, capacitance, moving charges, dielectric phenomena, and Maxwell's equations. Lecture three hours.

PHYS3143 (ENGR3103) Electronics

Upon demand. Prerequisite: PHYS2124 or ENGR3104. Amplifiers, power supplies, oscillators, trigger circuits, modulation, and demodulation. Intended to acquaint students with the working principles of the equipment they will use as a physicist. Lecture two hours, laboratory three hours. $10 laboratory fee.

PHYS3153 Solid State Physics

Upon demand. Prerequisites: PHYS2114, 2124; CHEM2124. Corequisite: MATH3243. An introduction to the physics governing the crystalline state of matter. Modern theories describing lattice vibrations, energy bands, crystal binding, and optical properties are presented. These ideas are then applied to the understanding of technologically important areas such as superconductivity, doped semiconductors, ferroelectric materials, and photorefractivity. Lecture 3 hours.

PHYS3213 Modern Physics

Upon demand. Prerequisite: PHYS2124. Corequisite: MATH3243. Introduction to relativity, wave-particle interactions, atomic structure, quantum mechanics, quantum theory of the hydrogen atom, statistical mechanics, nuclear structure, and elementary particles. Lecture 3 hours.

PHYS3991-3 Special Problems in Physics and Astronomy

Upon demand. Requires departmental approval. Advanced students carry out independent research activity relating to significant problems in physics and astronomy. Supervised by faculty member. Formal report and presentation required. One to three credits depending on problem selected and effort made.

PHYS4001, 4011 (PHYS3001, 3011) Colloquium

Upon demand, Prerequisite: Junior standing. Attendance required of students interested in physics concentration. Discussion of advanced topics in current physical theory. Student presentations are required. Lecturediscussion one hour.

PHYS4003 Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics

Upon demand. Prerequisite: PHYS2124, Pre or corequisite: MATH3243. Applications of the three laws of thermodynamics, partitionfunctions and transport phenomena. Lecture three hours.

PHYS4013 Quantum Mechanics

Upon demand. Prerequisites: PHYS3213 and MATH3243, A formal course in wave and matrix mechanics, designed to enable a student to set up and solve the elementary practical problems of quantum mechanics. Lecture three hours.

PHYS4113 Advanced Physics Laboratory

Upon demand. Prerequisite: PHYS3003; Corequisite: 3133, 4013. An application and investigation of advanced physical topics in the laboratory. Techniques of experimental [engineering] physics, such as computerized instrumentation, vacuum technology, optics, and electron optics will be applied to investigate various areas of advanced physics. Proper data reduction and analysis will be used to yield meaningful measurements. Intended as a culminating course, previous course work is applied to solve problems in the laboratory. Lecture 1 hour, Lab 5 hours. $10 laboratory fee.

PHYS4213 Advanced Topics in Physics and Astronomy

Upon demand. Prerequisite: PHYS2114, PHYS2124. Corequisite: MATH3243. Introduction to relativity, elementary particle physics, quantum dynamics, big-bang cosmology, atomic nucleosynthesis, and large scale structure and exotic states of matter such as black holes. Forces and interactions between the building blocks of matter in addition to cosmological models will be studied to gain insight into the complex universe we observe today. Lecture two hours, laboratory two hours. $10 laboratory fee.

PHYS49914 Special Problems in Physics and Astronomy

Upon demand. Requires departmental approval. Advanced students carry out independent research activity relating to significant problems in physics and astronomy. Supervised by faculty member. Formal report and presentation required. One to four credits depending on problem selected and effort made.

Political Science

POLS2003 American Government

Each semester. A study of the principles and practices of American Government, explaining the origin and purpose of our governmental institutions in a broad sense, with consideration given to interstate and national state relations.

POLS2013 Introduction to Political Science

The basic terms and concepts for the study of political science, including an understanding of democratic and authoritarian political systems and the methods for researching and writing a political science paper. This course is highly recommended for all students interested in political science.

POLS2421, 2431, 3421 Model United Nations Workshop

Each semester (spring semester enrollment by invitation only). Prerequisite: POLS3433. Participation in the state or regional Model United Nations. Only one of these courses may be taken for credit during a semester. POLS3421 may be repeated for credit three times.

POLS3013 Recent American Foreign and Military Policy

Prerequisites: POLS2013 and 3413 recommended. The post World War II environment in which U.S. foreign and military policy functions; emphasis is on the formulation of policy, relationship of foreign policy and domestic affairs, problems of foreign and military policy coordination and control, and the militaryindustrial complex.

POLS(CJ)3023 Judicial Process

The structure and operation of the state and national court systems. Emphasis upon the role of the criminal courts in the political system and the consequences of judicial policy making.

POLS3033 American State and Local Government

A comparative study of the nature of the organization and operation of state and local governments in the United States with emphasis on state and local government in Arkansas.

POLS3053 Introduction to Public Administration

A study of public administration with attention devoted to organizational problems and pathology, leadership, communication, control, and the hiring, training, compensating, motivating, and firing of personnel. Numerous case studies are considered.

POLS3083 Political Parties and Elections

Prerequisite: POLS2013. A study of American political parties, with stress on such topics as the electorate and public opinion, nature and history of parties, party organizations, nominations, and elections.

POLS3093 American Municipal Government

A comparative study of the structure, functions, politics, and problems of urban, suburban, and metropolitan governments in the United States, with emphasis on municipal governments in Arkansas.

POLS3403 Comparative Government

Prerequisite: POLS2013 recommended. A study of various political systems of the world, such as the governments of Western Europe, socialist or communist systems, and developing world governments. The focus of this course is often adjusted to deal with real world circumstances.

POLS3413 International Relations

Prerequisite: POLS2013 recommended. A study of the theory and practice of international politics, with special emphasis upon decision making, policy making, the state system, war and arms control, ideology and nationalism, the ecological system, interdependence, the multinationals, and human rights.

POLS3433 United Nations

Fall. Study of the organization and functioning of the United Nations, significant problems confronting world organization, weaknesses of the UN, and the future of world organization. Students will conduct research and write papers on significant international issues confronting the UN and on the foreign policy of selected members of the UN. Students will participate each week in a mock session of the UN and will attend, at their own expense, the annual session of the Arkansas Model United Nations, which normally meets on Friday and Saturday of the first week in December. Only one Model United Nations course may be taken for credit during a semester Course offered in fall semester only.

POLS3443 Soviet Successor States and East European Politics

Prerequisite: POLS2013 recommended. A survey of the government, politics, society, and foreign policy of the former republics of the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe, with an emphasis on current issues.

POLS3473 National Security Policy

Prerequisite: POLS2013 and 3013 recommended. A study of national security policy making, with an emphasis on current national security issues.

POLS(HIST)4043 American Constitutional Law to 1941

Development and application of the great constitutional principles by the Supreme Court in the evolution of American government as seen in the leading cases dealing with judicial review, separation of powers, and federal systems; protection of personal rights, interstate commerce, taxation, and due process of law in economic regulation and control.

POLS(CJ)4063 American Constitutional Law 1941-Present: Civil Liberties and Civil Rights

A comprehensive study of the United States Supreme Court's decisions on civil liberties and civil rights from 1941 to the present. Emphasis will be on the constitutional questions raised in these court cases and their impact on the fundamental freedoms of the Fourteenth Amendment and Bill of Rights.

POLS4103 Environmental Politics

Prerequisite: POLS2013 recommended. An examination of environmental issues from a policy perspective. Although scientific questions are involved, emphasis is on the political process of environmental issues. Topics discussed include the actors, their power, limits to their power, and their impact on the environmental policy process. May not be taken after completion of POLS 5103 or equivalent.

POLS(HIST)4113 American Racial and Cultural Minorities

A study of the role of racial and cultural minorities in America and the interrelationship of these minorities with American society from colonial times to the present with emphasis on Native Americans, African-Americans, and MexicanAmericans. May not be taken for credit after completion of HIST 5113 or equivalent.

POLS4403 Current Issues in Global Politics

Prerequisite: POLS2013 and 3413 recommended. Contemporary issues in global politics studied through participation in ICONS, an international intercollegiate computer simulation network. One country (past countries include Sweden and the United Kingdom) will be studied in depth as a vantage point from which to assess global affairs. May not be taken after completion of POLS 5403 or equivalent.

POLS4963 Senior Seminar

A required course for senior History and Political Science majors. Course content will cover a directed seminar in a specified area of Political Science. Research techniques will be emphasized.

POLS(HIST)49813 Social Sciences Seminar

A directed seminar in an area of social sciences. The specific focus will depend upon research underway, community or student need, and the unique educational opportunity available. This course may be repeated for credit if course content differs.

POLS49914 Special Problems in Political Science

A course for majors and minors only. Admission requires consent of department head.

Psychology

PSY2003 General Psychology

An introduction to basic concepts in the study of behavior and to elementary principles of genetics, individual differences, motivation, emotion, personality, sensation, and perception.

PSY2023 Consumer Psychology

An introduction to the application of psychological principles to the study of the acts of individuals involved in obtaining and using economic goods and services, including the decisionmaking processes that precede and determine these acts. Emphasis is placed on the role of perception, learning, personality, and attitude change.

PSY2033 Psychology of Adjustment

A course to provide a broad introduction to psychology as applied to human behavior. Focus is on the theoretical and experimental issues underlying the development and function of mental and emotional states. Emphasis is on normal functioning.

PSY(SOC)2053 Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences

Prerequisites: MATH1103 and PSY2003 or SOC1003, or consent. An introduction to descriptive and inferential statistical methods pertinent to behavioral sciences research, including correlation, sampling distributions, t-tests, chi square and analysis of variance. Emphasis is upon the logical and applied aspects.

PSY2074 Experimental Psychology

Prerequisite: PSY2003 and 2053. A study of research methods in psychology. Emphasis is placed upon developing skills in data gathering and analysis, report writing and application of basic research strategies. Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory per week.

PSY3003 Abnormal Psychology

Prerequisite: PSY2003. Emphasis will be placed upon the etiology, symptoms, and treatment of the neuroses, psychoses, and personality disorders.

PSY/SOC3013 Psychosocial Aspects of Death and Dying

Prerequisite: Upper division standing. This course studies the psychosocial and sociological aspects of death. The course will provide a basic insight into the dynamics surrounding death from the individual and societal level, its impact on survivors, and the effect death has on the living. This course cannot be taken for credit after completion of PSY4003.

PSY(BIOL)3023 Animal Behavior

On demand. Prerequisites: a biology course and a psychology course, or approval of the instructor. The comparative study of animal behavior utilizing the phylogenetic adaptations which determine the behavior of animals in a definable manner and based on the assumption that predictions about behavior can be made if a sufficient number of relative variables is known. Lecture two hours, laboratory two hours. $10 laboratory fee.

PSY(CJ)3033 The Criminal Mind

Prerequisite: PSY2003 and CJ2003 or SOC3043. The course familiarizes students with various models, theories, and research regarding criminality from a psychological perspective. Genetic, constitutional, and biological factors will be emphasized, and some practical applications to dealing with criminals will be considered.

PSY3043 Environmental Psychology

Prerequisite: PSY2003. This course is designed to provide students with information on the reciprocal relationship between humans and their environment, both natural and man-made. Major topics to be considered include (but are not limited to) the following: noise, pollution, temperature, density, architectural influences on human behavior, cognitive mapping, and crowding.

PSY3053 Physiological Psychology

Prerequisites: PSY2003, BIOL1124, or BIOL1014. An introduction to the physiological correlates of behavior, with emphasis upon the nervous system.

PSY3063 Developmental Psychology I

Prerequisite: PSY2003. A study of how the maturation process affects an individual's physical and psychological state from conception through adolescence. Representative topics include (but not limited to) genetic influences, child cognitive processes, moral reasoning, and testing.

PSY3073 Psychology of Learning

Prerequisite: Twelve hours of psychology. An introduction to the basic processes in learning and conditioning, including human and animal experimental findings. Emphasis will be placed on conditioning paradigms, reinforcement principles, memory functions and their use in behavior change.

PSY3093 Industrial Psychology

Prerequisite: PSY2003. A survey of psychological applications in industrial settings with emphasis upon selection, placement, and training techniques; organizational theory; and decisionmaking processes.

PSY31414 Seminar in Psychology

A directed seminar in an area of psychology. The specific focus will depend upon research underway, student need, and current developments in the field of psychology. May be repeated for credit if course content differs.

PSY3153 Theories of Personality

Prerequisite: Six hours of psychology. An introduction to the various theoretical viewpoints of the normal personality structure and its development.

PSY3163 Developmental Psychology II

Prerequisite: PSY2003. The study of how the maturation process affects an individual's physical and psychological state from adolescence through old age. Representative topics include (but not limited to) early, middle, and late adulthood biological, psychosocial and cognitive development.

PSY4013 History of Psychology

Prerequisite: PSY2003. A survey of the developments in psychology from the ancient Greeks to the emergence of psychology as a modern experimental science.

PSY4033 Psychological Tests and Measurements

Prerequisites: Twelve hours of psychology, PSY2053. Theory of psychological testing, statistical procedures, and training in administration, scoring and profiling of various tests of ability, achievement, interests, and personality.

PSY4043 Social Psychology

Prerequisite: PSY2053 and PSY2074 or permission. The study of how individuals are influenced by the actual or implied presence of other persons. Emphasis is placed on attitudes, social cognition, social influence, aggression, altruism, self and other perception.

PSY4053 Psychology of Perception

Prerequisite: Nine hours of psychology or consent. The study of general perceptual process. While the main senses will be covered, emphasis will be placed on visual functioning. The role of perception in organismic adaptation will be explored.

PSY4234 Field Placement

Prerequisites: PSY2023 or 3093, and PSY2053, 2074 (or comparable), senior major, and mutual consent of advisor, supervising faculty and industry supervisor. This course is a jointly supervised field placement in an area business or industry. Emphasis is placed on integration of theory and classroom work with onthejob experience. The placement is designed for students who are considering work in the area of industrial/organizational or consumer psychology. The purchase of professional liability insurance is required.

PSY49914 Special Problems in Psychology

Prerequisite: Eighteen hours of psychology and prior permission of instructor. Independent work under individual guidance of a faculty member.

Reading

READ 0103 College Reading Skills

A course designed to develop reading skills through perception training, vocabulary building, comprehension training, and active listening exercises. Individual diagnosis and prescription is emphasized. The grade in the course will be computed in semester and cumulative grade point averages, but the course may not be used to satisfy general education requirements nor provide credit toward any degree. A student who is placed in READ 0103 must repeat the course until he or she earns a grade of "C" or better. A student who makes a "D" or "F" in READ 0103 must repeat the course in each subsequent semester until he or she earns a grade of "C" or better.

Recreation and Park Administration

Coeducational Activities

(May be taken for General Education credit)

RP1002 Backpacking

This course is an introduction to basic backpacking skills, equipment, food, and backcountry travel. Day hikes and overnight hikes. Students will need to provide own personal equipment (backpack, sleeping bag, etc.) And be willing to share tents, stoves, cooking gear, etc. with other students in the course. Some students may need to borrow or purchase such gear depending on the equipment owned by members of the class.

RP1011 Sport Hunting

An introduction to the fundamentals of sport hunting, materials, and personal skills. Emphasis on state game laws, personal equipment and techniques in its usage, game species and their natural habitats, and firearm safety. Arkansas Hunter Safety certification awarded with successful completion.

RP1022 Boating Education

This course will take students through the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission Boating Guide. Those who successfully complete the course will be awarded Boating Safety Certification. A variety of audiovisual presentations will be used, and participation in one weekend day of actual boating experience is required. Certification is awarded upon completion.

RP1031 Introduction to Mountain Biking

Introduction to Mountain Biking is designed to introduce the beginning mountain biker to the basics needed for lifelong enjoyment of this recreational activity and sport. Emphasis on choosing equipment, maintenance, and riding skills. Riding opportunities at area trails and classroom instruction. Participants provide own transportation, bikes, and associated gear and equipment.

RP1051 Fundamentals of Canoeing

Prerequisites: All students must be able to enter deep water (over their head) and float, swim or tread water for two minutes, fully clothed. An introduction to the fundamentals of canoeing. The course will focus on safety and accident prevention in canoeing through training in basic skills and familiarization with equipment and proper procedures. The history of canoeing, applicable riparian law, and the use of canoes in camping, fishing, sailing, and competitive sports will be included. Certified by the American Red Cross. Fee required.

RP1061 Basic River Canoeing

Prerequisite: Certification in RP1051 or equivalent certification. An introduction to river canoeing and white-water sports. The course focus will be on techniques and equipment utilized in safe white-water sports. Involves one overnight canoe camping trip plus several day trips to Class I through Ill rivers in this area. Certified by the American Red Cross. Equipment fee required.

Academic Courses

RP(HA)1001 Orientation to Parks, Recreation, and Hospitality Administration

Orientation to the Parks, Recreation and Hospitality professions. An overview of the career opportunities in various Park, Recreation and Hospitality agencies and industries. Weekly speakers from PRHA agencies, industry and education will provide information on current issues in their professional areas of expertise.

RP1013 Principles of Recreation and Park Administration

A study of the history of the recreation and park profession and the basic sociological and ecological intermix of contemporary recreation and park services.

RP1992 Basic Forest Firefighting

Physical fitness standards as required by the U.S. Forest Service. The course will consist of U.S. Forest Service Basic Firefighting S190 and S130, utilizing classroom theory and weekend laboratory exercises which will enable successful candidates to obtain the "Red Card" recognized by most federal and many state firefighting agencies. Instruction will be by U. S. Forest Service certified instructors and RP faculty.

RP2003 Recreation Programming

Recreation program planning, supervision, and evaluation. This course examines the theory, principles, and leadership techniques of programming for individuals and groups in a variety of recreation settings, including the community, institutions, and camps. May not be taken for credit after completion of RP2002 and RP2012.

RP2013 Landscape Materials and Construction

Use of plant and construction materials and their application to environmental design, including a study of identification and effectiveness through texture, density, color, and relationship to structures and site development.

RP2033 Recreation Leadership

Spring semester. A study of the processes, methods, and characteristics of leadership and supervision in the delivery of leisure services.

RP2992 Wildland Fire SuppressionWater Use

Prerequisite: RP1992 or U.S. Forest Service Training Courses S130 and S190. A study of water use for wildland fire suppression including supply sources, delivery methods, application techniques, hydraulics, and equipment maintenance. Field exercises on weekends required with materials and equipment furnished.

RP3013 Recreation for Special Populations

Development of an understanding of disabled subpopulations and its relationship to recreation programming and administration for agencies at the local, state, and federal level of responsibilities.

RP3023 Camp Administration

Prerequisite: Junior standing. Theory and principles of camp administration, programming, leadership, and supervision in public, private, and school camps. Field trips, school camp.

RP3033 Commercial Recreation

An introduction to the spectrum of private planning, delivery and assessment of goods and services in the commercial sector of recreation.

RP3034 Site Planning and Design

Fundamentals of the site planning process and application to park and recreation development, including consideration of factors both external (user preferences) and internal to the site (function, organization and aesthetic treatment). Emphasis on resource capabilities and potentials. Lecture two hours, laboratory four hours.

RP(HA)3043 Work Experiences I

Fall, spring or summer. By permission. Supervised field application of class skills and knowledge in Parks, Recreation and Hospitality work situations. Students are given the opportunity to take part in meaningful management and work experiences in actual work situations under the supervision of both university faculty and professionals in the field. Minimum of 80 clock hours of work experience. Lecture one hour, laboratory four hours.

RP3053 Natural Resource Management and Planning

Study of the economic, social, political, and physical factors of the natural environment and methods to guide, direct, and influence orderly growth and development.

RP(ELED)3063 Outdoor Education

The historical development of outdoor education in America. Educational theory, practice and significance. Detailed analysis of typology, organization, administration and program planning for school outdooreducation programs. Field trips, school camp.

RP3093 Interpretive Methods

By permission. An analysis of various interpretive techniques, interpretive planning, and utilizing interpretation to obtain management goals. Preparation of an interpretive program with various audiovisual equipment.

RP3773 Sports Facilities Planning and Design (formerly Golf Course Planning & Design)

Fall. Introduction to the planning and design concepts necessary for the development, management, and maintenance of sports facilities. Emphasis will include design considerations (as dictated by a particular sport), environmental issues (in both the design and development phases), overall maintenance management of the facility (to include turf usage and equipment), as well as other timely or pertinent factors that might arise. Lecture 1 hour, Lab 2 hours.

RP3783 Turfgrass Management: Basic Chemical Usage

Spring. Prerequisite: CHEM1114. Introduction to Arkansas Pest Control law: definitions, requirements and exceptions. Pesticide labeling, formulation, application and storage discussed.

RP3993 Advanced FirefightingWildland/Urban Interface

Prerequisites: RP1992 and RP2992 or permission by experience. Advanced study of organization, deployment, and techniques of fire suppression applicable to wildfires affecting residences, outbuildings, and other humanstructure barriers in remote areas and outlying suburban locales. Particular emphasis on wildland structure and urban interface fire suppression problems. Weekend field exercises required.

RP(HA)4001 Internship Preparation

Prerequisites: PRHA major, senior standing, two semesters prior to internship, and completion of RP/HA3043 (if required for major) or permission of department head. Preparation for the internship experience.

RP(HA)4003 Fundamentals of Tourism

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor or PRHA major. An overview of tourism, the components of tourism, and how it relates to the hospitality industry. Exploration of current and future trends and the effects on the economy, as well as social and political impacts of tourism are examined. Web-based course.

RP4013 Recreation and Park Administration

Prerequisite: Six hours of RP courses. A study of the administrative process of planning, organizing, staffing, directing, evaluating, budgeting, and coordinating of recreation and park agencies. Special emphasis on budget, personnel, and supervisory practices of the decisionmaker mechanisms.

RP4023 Research Methods

Prerequisite: Twelve hours of RP courses. An introduction to the spirit and theory of research. The scientific method and application to the recreation and parks profession. Methods of problem identification, statement of testable hypothesis, design, summation of findings, research reporting, and writings will be examined.

RP4033 Tourism Planning

An examination of the tourism planning process and techniques. Topics include the examination of tourism as a system, levels of planning, environmental, cultural and economic components, attractions, transportation, infrastructure and marketing.

RP4042 Field Seminar in Interpretive Methods

This offcampus course will be of oneweek duration conducted at recreation and park facilities in Arkansas. The course will center on discussion of interpretive facilities, techniques, problems and innovations with leading professionals on site. A fee will be assessed to cover transportation for student vehicles. Lodging is usually provided by park agencies at the site free or at a very low cost.

RP4053 Water Resources Development

A study of water resources with emphasis on surface supply and small watershed and reservoir recreation. Supply and pollution in federal, state, local and private wateruse allocation will be considered. Basic wastewater certificate by the Arkansas Environmental Academy available.

RP4063 Park Operations

Prerequisite: RP2013. Basic principles, practices, and problems pertaining to the management of public park systems with emphasis on maintenance and operation schedules, construction and maintenance equipment, employee safety, office procedures, law enforcement, personnel management, and public relations.

RP4073 Principles and Techniques of Therapeutic Recreation

Prerequisite: RP3013 or permission of instructor. A professional course which examines the foundation, theory, philosophy, and historical significance of therapeutic recreation. Emphasis on the therapeutic recreation process as it relates to program development and service delivery for individuals with illnesses and/or disabilities in various clinical and community settings.

RP(HA)4093 Resort Management

Prerequisites: Junior standing and nine hours of RP or HA courses or by permission. An in-depth study of resorts with respect to their planning, development, organization, management, marketing, visitor characteristics, and environmental consequences. Passing exam results in certification from the Educational Institute of the American Hotel and Motel Association.

RP4103 Recreation Law and Policy

An examination of the relationship between recreation and the law. Specific topics include liability negligence, contracts, safety codes, law enforcement, insurance, and administration policy. Identification of legal decisionmaking organizations and the court system, including the policy dimensions of land acquisition, personnel disputes, and current issues in land use.

RP(HA)4113 Personnel Management in Parks, Recreation, and Hospitality Administration

Prerequisites: Junior standing and nine hours of RP or HA courses. An overview of personnel considerations in various Recreation and Park agencies and the Hospitality industry. Laws, legal issues, structure, staffing, motivation, training, conduct, policies and other aspects of agency/industry personnel relations will be examined using casestudies, as well as other methods.

HA(RP)4116 Internship

Each semester. Parks, Recreation, and Hospitality Administration majors only. Prerequisites: Senior standing, current certifications in CPR, Standard and Advanced First Aid and consent of department head. Placement in selected agency settings in student-trainee status under professional guidance of both agency supervisor and faculty. Emphasis will be placed on application of classroom theory to agency requirements which fulfill student's individual career interest. No prior experience credit will be granted. Minimum of 600 clock hours (15 weeks) of supervision and written report required.

RP4173 Therapeutic Recreation Assessment and Documentation

Prerequisites: RP4073 or permission of instructor. This course is an examination of the various assessment tools, styles of documentation, and methods of assessment and documentation utilized in therapeutic recreation services. The purpose of this course is to provide students with the basic skills and knowledge necessary to conduct therapeutic recreation assessments and to properly document health care information.

RP4273 Administration and Operation of Therapeutic Recreation Programs

Prerequisites: RP3013 and 4073 or permission of instructor. Program design and planning for effective administration of clientcentered services for special populations. Management of therapeutic recreation services including standards of practice, clinical supervision, reimbursement, marketing, budgeting, and writing policies and procedures.

RP4373 Interventions in Therapeutic Recreation

Prerequisites: RP3013, RP4073, or permission of instructor. This course is designed to provide an understanding of the various interventions utilized in therapeutic recreation services and to develop technical competencies necessary for the provision of quality therapeutic recreation services. Emphasis will be placed on the skillful application of various processes and techniques utilized to facilitate therapeutic changes in the client.

RP4773 Turfgrass Management: Climatic Regions and Cultivars

Fall. Prerequisite: AGSS2013. Introduction to turfgrasses including cultures, regions and climatic conditions. Soil conditions, regular care and undesirable plant control techniques surveyed.

RP4783 Turfgrass Management: Equipment

Spring. Prerequisite: 6 hours of Turf Management Emphasis. Introduction to turfgrass maintenance equipment including regular and new sod sites. Overview of financial analysis, operators center, equipment shop design, storage requirements, irrigation devices, and environmental compliance. Laboratory will include actual equipment set-up, servicing, operation and maintenance by factory authorized representatives on arranged basis. Certificate(s) available.

RP(HA)4991-3 Special Problems and Topics

On demand. Investigative studies and special problems and topics related to parks, recreation, and hospitality administration.

Rehabilitation Science

RS2003 Introduction to Rehabilitation Services

A survey of the history, philosophy, and roles of the rehabilitation and social services movement. In addition, the course will focus on public attitudes toward people with disability, adjustment to disability, and an orientation to the various community resources which can be utilized toward the rehabilitation of people with disability.

RS2093 Research and Data Methods for Rehabilitation Science

Prerequisites: MATH1103, PSY2053, or consent of instructor. The main purpose of this course is to provide knowledge of the basic principles of research which may be most useful in evaluation of problems in applied settings and in assisting the student to read and evaluate research in his professional field. While experience will be gained in the use of specific design approaches and statistical operations, stress will be upon use of objective problemsolving principles for decision making. The major source of illustrative materials will be the practical setting of various rehabilitative agency and facility programs.

RS3004 Medical and Psychosocial Aspects of Disability

A study of the etiology, treatment and prognosis of various disabling conditions. Emphasis will be placed on medical information as received in medical reports, and as related to vocational functioning and to the everyday psychological and social adjustment problems associated with disability. This course may not be taken for credit after completion of RS3003.

RS3013 The World of Work

A survey of the world of work emphasizing the role of work in our society, how disability changes one's work role, how career choices are made, and placement techniques.

RS3023 Principles and Techniques of Rehabilitation Services

Prerequisite: Junior standing and RS2003. An introduction to the casework process emphasizing principles of case management, interagency relations and interviewing skills.

RS3033 Introduction to Vocational Rehabilitation and the Vocational Rehabilitation Process

An overview of the history, philosophy, and legal basis of vocational rehabilitation plus an in-depth study of the case process. This class will emphasize the vocational rehabilitation process through studying closed case files and case recording procedures.

RS3043 Introduction to Social Services and the Social Service Case Process

An introduction to the history, philosophy, and legal basis of the social services movement. This class will also emphasize the social service case process and case management practices.

RS3053 Rehabilitation Approaches in the Correctional Setting

Prerequisite: SOC/CJ3043 or consent of the instructor. A comparative study of rehabilitation approaches in working with adult and juvenile public offenders. Approaches to be studied include: prisons, training schools, camps, halfway houses, work release, study release, preparole classes, vocational training.

RS(CJ)3063 Probation and Parole

Prerequisite: CJ2003 or SOC/CJ3043. A survey of the philosophy, origin, development, rise, and evaluation of probation and parole as correctional techniques.

RS3073 Organization and Structure in the RehabilitationHuman Services Setting

This course will provide the student with an overview of organizational and administrative structure in the rehabilitationhuman services setting. Additionally, it will focus on the dynamics involved in developing a successful managerial style.

RS3083 Supported Employment and Special Populations

Prerequisite: RS3013 or consent. An introduction to the ideas, philosophies, models, concepts, and issues that characterize supported employment. Applications with different disability populations will be reviewed.

RS3093 Rehabilitation Programming and the Elderly

Prerequisite: SOC3173 or consent of the instructor. A study of aging and the elderly from a rehabilitation viewpoint. This course will focus on intervention strategies, actual and potential, that might enable other people to maximize their potential and affect the needs for institutionalization.

RS3123 Ethics in Human Services

A study of personal values, CRCC, ACA, and APA professional guidelines, and decision making models that will assist future human service practitioners to effectively deal with ethical dilemmas. This course will emphasize critical thinking and problem solving, and will utilize instructor and student generated dilemmas.

RS3133 Multicultural Issues in Human Services

An introduction to issues of multiculturalism and diversity and the importance of understanding these issues when working with individuals. This class will emphasize understanding ones' own culture, examine various cultures including disability, and stress the importance of understanding each individual in relationship to his/her culture.

RS31414 Rehabilitation Science Seminar

A directed seminar in an area of rehabilitation science. The specific focus will depend upon research underway, community or student need, and the unique educational opportunity available. May be repeated for credit if course content differs.

RS3243 Social Services for Individuals and Families

Prerequisite: RS3043 or consent of instructor. A study of the varied and numerous services offered by federal, state, and privatelyfunded social service programs with an emphasis on protective services, foster care, and adoption services.

RS4012 Internship in Rehabilitation Services

(Twelvehour course). Prerequisite: RS2003, grade of C or higher in RS3023, rehab major, senior standing, 2.00 cumulative grade point average, and consent of the instructor. A full-time, one semester supervised internship in a rehabilitation or social services setting, either public or private. Emphasis will be placed on the student acquiring firsthand experience and entry level skills in practitioner roles such as case management, interviewing and counseling, and coordination of client services among the various community helping services. The purchase of professional liability insurance is required.

RS4024 Field Placement in Rehabilitation Science

Prerequisites: RS2003, grade of C or higher in RS3023, junior standing, 2.00 grade point average and consent of the instructor. A supervised 14week field placement in which the student may either be placed in one agency setting or if a broader experience is desired may rotate among several agencies. Emphasis will be placed upon gaining an understanding of the community context and coordination of client services among the various rehabilitation and helping agencies. The purchase of professional liability insurance is required.

RS4034 Field Placement Related to Vocational Rehabilitation

Prerequisite: RS2003, grade of C or higher in RS3023, junior standing, completion of at least six hours in the related emphasis area, 2.00 grade point average, and consent of the instructor. A supervised 14week field placement in a setting related to vocational rehabilitation. Emphasis will be placed on the student's acquiring firsthand experience in practitioner roles such as case management, interviewing and counseling, and coordination of client services among the various community helping services. The purchase of professional liability insurance is required.

RS4044 Field Placement Related to Aging

Prerequisite: RS2003, grade of C or higher in RS3023, junior standing, completion of at least six hours in the related emphasis area, 2.00 grade point average, and consent of the instructor. A supervised 14week field placement in a setting related to aging. Emphasis will be placed on the student's acquiring firsthand experience in practitioner roles such as case management, interviewing and counseling, and coordination of client services among the various community helping services. The purchase of professional liability insurance is required.

RS4054 Field Placement Related to Corrections

Prerequisite: RS2003, grade of C or higher in RS3023, junior standing, completion of at least six hours in the related emphasis area, 2.00 grade point average, and consent of the instructor. A supervised 14week field placement in setting related to corrections and delinquency. Emphasis will be placed on management, interviewing and counseling, and coordination of client services among the various community helping services. The purchase of professional liability insurance is required.

RS4064 Field Placement Related to Social Services

Prerequisite: RS2003, grade of C or higher in RS3023, junior standing, completion of at least six hours in the related emphasis area, 2.00 grade point average, and consent of the instructor. A supervised 14week field placement in a setting related to social services. Emphasis will be placed on the student's acquiring firsthand experiences in practitioner roles such as case management, interviewing and counseling, and coordination of client services among the various community helping services. The purchase of professional liability insurance is required.

RS4074 Field Placement for Psychology and Sociology Majors

Prerequisite: RS2003, grade of C or higher in RS3023, fifteen hours in major, senior standing, 2.00 grade point average, and mutual consent of the student's advisor, the supervising faculty member, and the director of Rehabilitation Science. A jointly supervised field placement in a human services agency setting, either public or private, Emphasis will be placed on the student's acquiring firsthand experience in practitioner roles as they relate to his major and special interest. The purchase of professional liability insurance is required.

RS4084 Field Placement Related to Child Welfare Services

Prerequisite: RS3043, RS3243, grade of C or higher in RS3023, senior standing, completion of at least six hours in the related emphasis area, 2.50 grade point average, and consent of the instructor. A supervised 14-week field placement in a Division of Children and Family Services setting. Emphasis will be placed on the student's acquiring first-hand experiences in practitioner roles such as case management, interviewing, risk assessment, interagency collaboration, crisis management, and problem solving. The purchase of professional liability insurance is required.

RS4123 Survey of Counseling Theories

Prerequisites: Six hours of psychology to include PSY2003, PSY3063, or PSY3003, RS3153, senior standing, or consent of the instructor. A comparative study of the major theories of counseling, stressing their philosophical views of mankind, assumptions, techniques, strengths, and weaknesses.

RS4133 Seminar in Severe Disabilities

A study of what makes a disabling condition a severe disability. This course will stress independent research and class presentations by the students dealing with the various severe disabilities.

RS4143 Rehabilitation of the Developmentally Disabled

Prerequisite: PSY2003, RS2003, or consent. A study of the delivery of services to, and the rehabilitation of, those handicapped individuals classified as being developmentally disabled, i.e., mental retardation, cerebral palsy, and epilepsy. Emphasis will be placed on prevocational, vocational, and community-living training for such individuals and the planning required for the provision of such services.

RS4153 Work Evaluation in Rehabilitation

Prerequisite: RS3013 or consent. A study of the use of work evaluation as a part of the rehabilitation process, emphasizing the philosophy, development and application of work evaluation methods, and use of work evaluation results in rehabilitation services.

RS4163 Substance Abuse

Prerequisite: RS2003, PSY2003, SOC1003, or consent of the instructor. A study of drug abuse emphasizing etiology, patterns of use and abuse, and problems related to research and approaches to treatment.

RS4173 Family Centered Services

Prerequisite: RS3023 and 3243 or consent of the instructor. An advanced course focusing upon family and community strengths and child welfare practice.

RS4183 Family Services Seminar

Prerequisite: RS3023 and 3243 or consent of the instructor. A capstone course for students emphasizing child welfare services.

RS49914 Special Problems in Rehabilitation Science

Prerequisites: Twelve hours of rehabilitation science and prior approval of the Director of Rehabilitation Science. Independent work under individual guidance of a staff member.

Russian

RUSS1014 Beginning Russian I

Emphasis on conversation; introduction to basic grammar, reading, writing, and culture.

RUSS1024 Beginning Russian II

Continued emphasis on conversation and fundamental language skills.

RUSS2014 Intermediate Russian I

Prerequisite: Beginning Russian II (RUSS1024) or equivalent. Instruction designed to develop communication skills and basic knowledge of grammar, reading, writing, and culture.

RUSS2024 Intermediate Russian II

Prerequisite: Intermediate Russian I or equivalent. Instruction designed to enhance communication skills and knowledge of grammar, reading, writing, and culture.

Secondary Education

SEED2002 Introduction to Secondary Education

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or departmental approval. This course is designed to help secondary teacher candidates understand the field of education systemically and to understand the professional roles and ethical responsibilities required of the professional secondary educator. The course consists of classroom instruction and a guided field component. A grade of "C" or higher in the course is required in order to be eligible for admission into Stage II of Teacher Education.

SEED3554 Adolescent Development and Exceptionalities

Prerequisite: Admission to Stage II. This four hour survey course is designed to study the physical, emotional, mental, and social growth of the adolescent and to acquaint secondary education candidates with the range of exceptionalities and their special needs in the school program.

SEED3702 Introduction to Educational Technology

This is a research-based course involving applications of media techniques to facilitate learning. Media presentations are planned and implemented using practical and theoretical considerations about learning characteristics, exceptionalities, and cultural differences. Various projection techniques as well as microcomputer applications are utilized.

SEED4503 Seminar in Secondary Education

Prerequisites: Admission to Stage II and Student Teaching. This course is to be taken concurrently with SEED4909/4809. This course is designed to provide secondary teacher candidates with knowledge and understanding of the history of American Education, school law, and other contemporary education issues. This course will also address teaching/learning strategies for content area learning and assessment.

SEED4063/5063 Educators-in-Industry

Each semester on demand. A course devoted to career awareness in relation to the modern workplace. It is conducted in cooperation with local businesses and industries. The course involves research, on-site instruction, and work experience.

SEED(VOBE)4556 Classroom Application of Educational Psychology

Prerequisite: Admission to Stage II of the Teacher Education Program. This course introduces secondary teacher candidates to educational psychology as a research-oriented discipline and a science of practical application. The course also requires that students apply the theories and principles to instructional planning, teaching, managing and assessing students. The course consists of classroom instruction and a field component.

SEED4809 Teaching in the Elementary and Secondary School

Prerequisites: Admission to Stage II and student teaching and concurrent enrollment in SEED4701, 4702, and 4711. A minimum of twelve weeks of supervised full-time student teaching at both the elementary and secondary levels. Meets requirements for K12 licensure in art and music and licensure at both the elementary and secondary levels for physical education. Fee $100.

SEED4909 Teaching in the Secondary School

Prerequisites: Admission to Stage II and student teaching and concurrent enrollment in SEED4701, 4702, and 4711. A minimum of twelve weeks of supervised full-time student teaching at the secondary level. Fee $100.

SEED49914 Special Problems in Secondary Education

Each semester on demand. Prerequisite: Senior standing and approval of department head. Individual study of significant topics or problems relating to education under the guidance of an assigned faculty member.

Sociology

SOC1003 Introductory Sociology

An introduction to the nature of society, social groups, processes of interaction, social change, and the relationship of behavior to culture.

SOC(CJ)2003 Introduction to Criminal Justice

An overview of the criminal justice system and the workings of each component. Topics include the history, structure and functions of law enforcement, judicial and correctional organizations, their interrelationship and effectiveness, and the future trends in each.

SOC2013 Self and Society

Prerequisite: SOC1003 or PSY2003. A sociological survey of the ways in which social structure and personality interact. Topics typically covered are: socialization, attitudes and value formation and change, and group influences upon selfconcept and selfesteem.

SOC2033 Social Problems

Prerequisite: SOC1003. A sociological analysis of contemporary social problems including inequalities, deviance, population changes, and troubled institutions.

SOC(PSY)2053 Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences

Prerequisite: MATH1103 and PSY2003 or SOC1003, or consent. An introduction to descriptive and inferential statistical methods pertinent to behavioral science research, including correlation, sampling distributions, t-tests, chi square and analysis of variance. Emphasis is upon the logical and applied aspects.

SOC2073 History of Social Thought

A study of the historical development of social thought. May not be taken for credit after completion of SOC4023, PHIL4053, or equivalent.

SOC2083 Sociological Theory

A survey course of sociological theories and theory development from the classical period to post-modernism.

SOC3003 Sociology of Complex Organizations

Prerequisite: SOC1003. An extensive and intensive investigation of theories and research related to the sociology of complex organizations. The course aims for a focus on both micro and macro perspectives while maintaining an emphasis on the pragmatics of social organizations and organizational behavior.

SOC(PSY)3013 Psychosocial Aspects of Death and Dying

Prerequisite: Upper division standing. This course studies the psychological and sociological aspects of death. The course will provide a basic insight into the dynamics surrounding death from the individual and societal level, its impact on survivors, and the effect death has on the living. This course cannot be taken for credit after completion of PSY4003.

SOC3023 The Family

Prerequisite: SOC1003. A study of the American family institution with emphasis upon role relationships, norms, and models. Some attention is given to crosscultural comparisons.

SOC(CJ)3043 Crime and Delinquency

Prerequisite: SOC1003 or CJ2003. A study of the major areas of crime and delinquency; with emphasis on theories of crime and the nature of criminal behavior.

SOC3053 Population Problems

A demographic analysis of population. Emphasis is upon the United States with crosscultural comparisons.

SOC3063 Communities

Prerequisite: SOC1003. An exploration and analysis of the sociological concept of community from classical approaches to recent debates. May not be taken for credit after completion of SOC2063.

SOC3093 Sociology of Education

Prerequisite: SOC1003. A study of education as a social system, its organizational characteristics, and its interrelationships with other social systems such as the family, religion, economics, government, and politics.

SOC(CJ)3103 The Juvenile Justice System

Prerequisite: SOC(CJ)2003. An in-depth look at the juvenile justice system including the structure, statuses and roles as well as current issues, problems, and trends.

SOC3113 Social Movements and Social Change

Prerequisite: SOC1003. An examination of past and current social movements and their effects on social policy and social change. Topics will include classical and contemporary theories of social movements and social change.

SOC(CJ)3153 Prison and Correction

An introduction to and analysis of contemporary American corrections. Emphasis will be on current and past correctional philosophy, traditional and modern correctional facilities, correctional personnel and offenders, new approaches in corrections, and the relationship of corrections to the criminal justice field.

SOC3163 Introduction to Social Research

Prerequisite: SOC1003 and SOC2053. An introduction to research methodology, with emphasis upon conceptualization, design, and processes.

SOC3173 Social Gerontology

Prerequisite: SOC1003. An introduction to the sociology of aging: content provides general and specific knowledge regarding the aging process. Implications for economic, political, and family institutions are emphasized.

SOC(CJ)3206 The Law in Action

Prerequisite: SOC/CJ3043 and permission. Offered only in the summer. An examination of sociological theories of law and main currents of legal philosophy is followed by participant observation of actual community legal agencies, including police, courts, and others as available. Requires insurance fee.

SOC4003 Minority Relations

Prerequisite: SOC1003. A study of minority groups with emphasis upon discrimination, sociohistorical characteristics and processes of change. Minorities considered include racial, ethnic, and gender.

SOC4053 Sociology of Health and Illness

Prerequisite: SOC1003. An in-depth look at the sociology of health and illness including an examination of the social structures related to the medical system, the social psychology of health and illness, a comparative analysis of sick role behavior as well as the study of social causes and consequences of health and illness.

SOC4063 Social Stratification

Prerequisite: SOC1003. A study of social class and consequences for society and individuals.

SOC41414 Seminar in Sociology

A directed seminar in an area of sociology. The specific focus will depend upon research underway, community or student need, and the unique educational opportunity available. May be repeated for credit if course content differs.

SOC49914 Special Problems in Sociology

Prerequisite: Prior approval by instructor. Content will be determined by specific curriculum review and student need.

Spanish

SPAN1014 Beginning Spanish I

Introduction to conversation, basic grammar, reading, and writing. Four hours of classroom instruction. Advanced placement and credit by examination are available to students who have previously studied Spanish.

SPAN1024 Beginning Spanish II

Continued instruction in grammar and fundamental language skills. Four hours of classroom instruction.

SPAN1063 Basic Spanish for Medical and Social Services

Useful terminology and expressions for the medical and socialservice situation, with a minimum of grammar. May be acceptable in lieu of SPAN1014 with instructor's consent.

SPAN2014 Intermediate Spanish I

Prerequisite: SPAN1024 or equivalent. Instruction designed to develop greater facility in fundamental skills and more extensive knowledge of grammar. Four hours of classroom instruction.

SPAN2024 Intermediate Spanish II

Instruction intended to complete the survey of the basic grammar of the language and to provide the mastery of fundamental skills essential for enrollment in upperlevel Spanish courses. Four hours of classroom instruction.

SPAN3003 Conversation and Composition I

Prerequisite: SPAN2024 or equivalent. Further study of Spanish grammatical systems with practice in composition and conversation based on analysis of short texts (newspaper articles, short stories, plays, poetry). Students are expected to use Spanish in oral and written expression.

SPAN3013 Conversation and Composition II

Prerequisite: SPAN3003 or equivalent. Continuation of SPAN3003.

SPAN(ENGL, FR, GER, SPH)3023 Introduction to Linguistics

Prerequisites: ENGL1023 and SPAN2024 or equivalent. A study of basic concepts in language, comparative characteristics of different languages, and the principles of linguistic investigation.

SPAN3123 Spanish Civilization and Culture

Prerequisite: SPAN2024 or equivalent. Study of the geography, history, arts, institutions, customs and contemporary life of the Spanish people.

SPAN3133 Spanish-American Civilization and Culture

Prerequisite: SPAN2024 or equivalent. Study of the geography, history, arts, institutions, customs, and contemporary life of the peoples of Spanish America, with some attention to the major pre-Columbian civilizations.

SPAN3143 Contemporary Hispanic Culture Immersion Experiences

Prerequisite: enrollment in a Tech-sanctioned travel/study program in a Hispanic country, completion of SPAN2024 or equivalent, and permission of the instructor. Study of the contemporary culture of a Hispanic country as manifested in a specific region. May substitute for SPAN3003 or, if appropriate, for SPAN3013.

SPAN3153 Hispanic Cultural Heritage Immersion Experiences

Prerequisite: enrollment in a Tech-sanctioned travel/study program in a Hispanic country, completion of SPAN2024 or equivalent, and permission of the instructor. Study of the cultural heritage of a Hispanic country as manifested in a specific region. May be repeated for credit in a different region. May substitute for SPAN3123 if taught in Spain or for SPAN3133 if taught in Spanish America.

SPAN4213 Spanish Literature

Prerequisite: SPAN2024 or equivalent. A survey of the literature of Spain with readings from representative works.

SPAN4223 SpanishAmerican Literature

Prerequisite: SPAN2024 or equivalent. A survey of SpanishAmerican literature with readings from representative works.

SPAN4283 Seminar in Spanish

Prerequisite: SPAN2024 or equivalent. Course content will vary. May be repeated for credit if course content varies.

SPAN4701 Special Methods in Spanish. Prerequisites: Admission to student teaching phase of the teacher education program and concurrent enrollment in SEED4909. Intensive on-campus exploration of the principles of curriculum construction, teaching methods, use of community resources, and evaluation as related to teaching Spanish.

SPAN(FR,GER,)4703 Foreign Language Teaching Methods

Prerequisite: SPAN3013 and 3113 or equivalent; admission to Stage II of the Secondary Education sequence or equivalent. Survey of instructional methods and discussions and demonstration of practical techniques for the teaching of a foreign language.

SPAN4801 Cultural Immersion and Research

Prerequisite: Enrollment in Spanish Immersion Weekend and permission of instructor. Intensive study of Spanish cultural topics followed by individual research projects. May be repeated for credit if content varies.

SPAN(FR,GER,JPN)4901-3 Foreign Language Internship

Prerequisites: Advanced foreign language proficiency; permission of the instructor and the department head. The Foreign Language Internship is intended primarily for majors in foreign languages or international studies. It is designed to provide outstanding students the opportunity to perfect their language proficiency and to acquire specific training and skills overseas. The overseas sponsor and the foreign language instructor of record will supervise the intern. Performance evaluations and a research paper will be required.

SPAN49914 Special Problems in Spanish

Prerequisite: SPAN2024 and consent of the instructor and the department head. Designed to provide advanced students with a course of study in an area not covered by departmental course offerings.

Speech

SPH1003 Introduction to Speech - Communication

The purpose of this course is to develop within each individual an understanding of the utilitarian and aesthetic dimensions of speechcommunication and to increase ability to function effectively with others in a variety of communication situations.

SPH1011 Orientation to Speech Communication Studies

Required of all Speech Communication majors. An overview of student research expectations, university resources, contemporary trends in the field, and employment opportunities. Should be taken upon declaring a major. May be taken concurrently with other speech communication courses.

SPH1021 Listening

Required of all Speech Communication majors. A course to identify critical aspects of listening problems and to develop understanding and utilization of skills needed to improve listening.

SPH1031 Parliamentary Procedures

A contemporary and practical approach toward the acquisition of the knowledge and skills necessary to effectively participate in organizational discourse where the rules of parliamentary procedure are utilized.

SPH1111, 1121 Individual Events Practicum

Preparation and performance of a variety of public speaking events.

SPH2003 Public Speaking

Each semester. Prerequisites: ENGL1013 or equivalent. Fundamentals of composition, delivery, and logical reasoning. Effective utilization of basic visual aids will be included.

SPH2013 Voice and Diction

A course for majors and nonmajors. A study of the effective use of the voice, improvement of diction, development of vocabulary, use of the dialects, techniques of radio television announcing, recognition of basic speech disorders.

SPH2111, 2121 Debate Practicum

Case research and participation in public debate.

SPH2173 Business and Professional Speaking

An oral communication course for individuals in business, industry and the professions. Human communication theories and behavioral research are used as a framework for generating competencies in interviewing, briefings, conference leadership, and intergroup coordination.

SPH3003 Interpersonal Communication

This course emphasizes interpersonal aspects of communication. Central topics are choice making, personal knowledge, creativity and interpersonal relationships. Increased selfawareness, understanding of interpersonal relationships and improvement of interpersonal skills are primary goals.

SPH3013 Intercultural Communication

Prerequisite: SPH1003, or SPH2003, or consent of instructor. An examination of communication variables in different cultures and how to better understand and more effectively communicate across diverse cultures.

SPH(ENGL, FR, GER, SPAN)3023 Introduction to Linguistics

Fall. Prerequisite: ENGL1023 or equivalent. A study of basic concepts of language, comparative characteristics of different languages, and the principles of linguistic investigation.

SPH3033 Interviewing Principles and Practices

Prerequisite: SPH2003 or consent of instructor. A course for both majors and nonmajors that uses interviewing theory as a framework for developing skills in preparing for and practicing various types of interviews.

SPH3063 Oral Interpretation

Theory and practice of intelligent and effective oral reading of prose and poetry.

SPH3073 Group Discussion

Procedures used in small groups to facilitate the exchange of information, sharing ideas, solving problems, determining policies, and implementing action.

SPH3083 Communication and the Classroom Teacher

Prerequisites: Junior standing and completion of ENGL1023 or equivalent. A study of the relationship between communication theory and instructional processes. Practical classroom experiences are stressed.

SPH3111, 3121 Debate Practicum

Case preparation, brief writing, and participation in public debate.

SPH3123 Argumentation

Prerequisites: SPH1003, SPH2003 or equivalent, or consent of instructor. Designed to develop research, critical thinking, and persuasive speaking ability. Includes lecture, discussion, research, study of debates, classroom debates, and presentations.

SPH3223 Nonverbal Communication

This course provides an examination of the various methods in which nonverbal communication is utilized in the communication process. Included in the examination will be historical contexts, as well as the effects of physical appearance, touch, proxemics, eye contact, kinesics, and voice.

SPH4003 Human Communication Theory

Prerequisite: 18 hours in Speech Communication, consent of instructor. This capstone theory class integrates learning about speech communication in various contexts. It is an in-depth study of contemporary and traditional perspectives of human communication, and synthesizes major concepts in human communication theory development.

SPH4053 SpeechCommunication Seminar

Prerequisite: Junior standing. A course for both majors and nonmajors who want to investigate the relationship between human communication and contemporary social, political, and economic issues.

SPH4063 Organizational Communication

Prerequisites: SPH1003 and SPH3003 or SPH3073 or equivalent, or consent of instructor. Theories of organizational communication are examined in terms of their practical application to various organizational contexts, including social, political, profit, and nonprofit organizations. Includes lecture, discussion, research, and group projects.

SPH4073 Directing Forensics

Prerequisites: SPH2003, SPH3063, SPH3123, and/or consent of the instructor. Practical study and training to lead to the planning of activities, directing competitive events, and administration of a forensic program on the high school level.

SPH4111, 4121 Individual Events Practicum

Preparation and performance of a variety of interpretive events.

SPH4123 Rhetorical Criticism

Prerequisite: SPH1003, or SPH2003, or consent of the instructor. This course will provide the principles of rhetorical theories as they have developed throughout history, and apply them to the critical analysis of various communication events.

SPH4153 Persuasive Theory and Audience Analysis

Survey of classical and social science theories of persuasion. Particular emphasis is given to analysis of persuasive strategies, preparation of persuasive appeals, ethics of persuasion, and audience analysis. A consideration of social movements and persuasive campaigns is also included.

SPH4173 Internship in Speech Communication

Prerequisites: Fifteen semester hours of Speech and SPH4063, which can be taken concurrently; university grade point average of at least 2.50. A course that focuses on career goals of students through classroom discussions and places students in communication positions within public and private organizations.

SPH4283 Children's Theatre: Techniques and Practicum

Summer. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor. The philosophy of teaching acting to children, in theory and in practice. The course is designed for drama majors, teachers, and others interested in child development. The semester equivalent of two hours of class lecture is combined with the semester equivalent of two hours of supervised laboratory experience in a children's theatre setting. May not be taken for credit after completion of SPH 5283 or equivalent.

SPH4701 Special Methods in Speech

Prerequisites: Admission to student teaching phase of the teacher education program and concurrent enrollment in SEED4909. Intensive oncampus exploration of the principles of curriculum construction, teaching methods, use of community resources, and evaluation as related to teaching speech.

SPH49914 Special Problems in SpeechCommunication

A course for majors only. Students are accepted by invitation of the instructor.

Theatre

TH2203 Play Analysis

A course designed for the theatre major. Contains techniques and vocabulary essential for doing a production-based analysis for the student actor, designer or director.

TH2273 Introduction to Theatre

Prerequisite: ENGL1013 or equivalent. TH2273 may be used to fulfill the fine arts general education requirement. A study of theatre as an art form with particular attention to scenic, dramatic, literary and historic elements.

TH2301 Introduction to Theatrical Dance

An introduction to the basic skills and discipline of stage movement and the steps and vocabulary of jazz, tap and ballet. This course counts as a PE activity credit in degree programs that are not intended for teacher licensure.

TH2331 Advanced Theatrical Dance

Prerequisite: TH2301. This course provides a continuation of the skills development for stage movement, and the steps, vocabulary, and discipline of ballet, tap, jazz, modern dance, and basic partnering. This course counts as a PE activity credit in degree programs that are not intended for teacher licensure.

TH2513 Introduction to Theatrical Design and Production

An introduction to the field of technical theatre.

TH2511, 2521 Practicum in Set Construction and Lighting

Credit will be given for forty hours of participation in these elements of stagecraft.

TH2611, 2621 Practicum in Costume and Makeup

Credit will be given for forty hours of participation in these elements of stagecraft.

TH2703 Acting Theories and Techniques

An introduction to standard acting techniques, including method acting.

TH2711, 2721 Acting Practicum

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Credit will be given for a large part in a major production or for a small part preceded by a series of smaller parts in previous productions.

TH2713 Intermediate Acting

Prerequisite: TH2703 or equivalent. Emphasis on character development, character interaction, and scene work, with special attention to comedy.

TH3513 Stagecraft Techniques

A course for both majors and nonmajors who want to learn the technical aspects of dramatic productions. A study of the different types of presentations - their construction, organization, and use. Emphasis will be placed upon children's theatre, reader's theatre, and pageant theatre as well as on the traditional proscenium theatre.

TH3523 Principles of Theatrical Lighting

Prerequisite: TH3513, or consent of instructor. An introduction to lighting design, including the history of theatrical lighting, electrical theory and practice, lighting control systems, color in lighting, and the process of creating basic lighting keys.

TH3703 Advanced Acting: Styles

Prerequisite: TH2713 or equivalent. The analysis and performance of scenes from plays from various historical periods, with attention to vocal and kinesthetic qualities appropriate to different styles.

TH3803 Directing Theories and Techniques

An introduction to standard directing techniques.

TH3811, 3821 Directing Practicum

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Credit will be given for directing a oneact play.

TH3833 Advanced Directing

Prerequisites: TH3811, and consent of instructor. Credit will be given for directing a fulllength play.

TH4243 Senior Project in Theatre History

Research project approved by the department to facilitate graduate school application.

TH(ENGL)4263 Theatre History I: Antiquity to 1564

A historical survey of the development of drama and theatre from classical Greece through the sixteenth century.

TH(ENGL)4273 Theatre History II: 1564 to 1900

A historical survey of the development of drama and theatre from the seventeenth to the nineteenth centuries.

TH4313 Theatre History III: 1900 to 1960

The development of theatre during the first part of the twentieth century, including realism, expressionism, symbolism, epic theatre, and theatre of the absurd. May not be repeated for credit.

TH4323 Theatre History IV: 1960 to the Present

The development of theatre during the latter part of the twentieth century, including neorealism, postmodernism, feminism, political theatre, and collective creation. May not be repeated for credit as TH 5323.

TH4503 Scene Design

Prerequisites: TH3513, or permission of instructor. A study of the elements of design for the stage, from conception to finished production models, focusing on line, form, mass, and color. May not be repeated for credit as TH 5503 or equivalent.

TH4506 High School Play Production

This course provides essential information about high school play production. The course will provide basic information in lighting, sound design, set design and construction, makeup, costume design and construction, stage management, directing, and improvisational techniques. May not be repeated for credit as TH 5506 or equivalent.

TH4513 Drafting for the Stage

Mechanical drawing techniques are practiced to produce ground plans, elevations, construction drawings, and perspective sketches of theatrical settings.

TH4523 Advanced Stagecraft

Prerequisite: TH3513 or permission of instructor. A course for technical theatre emphasis majors that helps to prepare the student for managing a theatre shop. Teaches advanced construction techniques, welding, pyrotechnics, and people managing skills.

TH4543 Senior Project in Design

Portfolio creation project approved by the department to facilitate graduate school application process or professional placement.

TH4613 Introduction to Costuming

An examination of the history, theory and practice of costume design. It makes use of lecture, practical experience and personal exploration through a variety of artistic media to help each student understand both the art and technology of costume design.

TH4843 Senior Project in Theatrical Performance

Portfolio creation project approved by the department to facilitate graduate school application or professional placement.

TH4983 Theatre Seminar

Prerequisites: Twelve credits in theatre and junior standing. A directed seminar dealing with a selected topic in theatre studies. May be repeated for credit for different topics. May not be repeated for credit as TH 5983 unless topic is different.

TH49914 Special Problems in Theatre

For majors only. Students are accepted by invitation of the instructor.

Vocational Business Education

(Additional prerequisites for 3000 and 4000level courses are listed in the School of Business section of this catalog.)

VOBE4023-5023 Methods of Teaching Vocational Business

A methods course designed to prepare the beginning business educator for effective teaching in the contemporary vocational business education classroom. Teaching methodologies for the business education occupational clusters are presented and practiced.

VOBE4053-5053 Technology Methods for Business Education

A course in technology education focusing on methods and hands-on activities utilized in secondary Business Education programs with emphasis on hardware, software, and program development. May not be repeated for credit as VOBE 5053 or equivalent.

VOBE4063-5063 Educators-in-Industry

A course devoted to career awareness in relation to the modern workplace. It is conducted in cooperation with local businesses and industries. The course involves research, on-site instruction, and work experience.

VOBE4093-5093 Directed Vocational Work Experience

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor and advisor's recommendation. A course for business teachers or business education students who desire or need practical, on-the-job experience in areas related to the vocational business education curriculum; designed to provide practical experience in a structured, supervised setting.

VOBE(SEED)4556 Classroom Application of Educational Psychology

Prerequisite: Admission to Stage II of the teacher education program. Application of educational psychology principles to middle level and secondary classroom practices. The course may not be taken after completion of EDFD3042, EDFD3045.

VOBE4701 Special Methods in Vocational Business

Prerequisites: Admission to student teaching phase of the teacher education program and concurrent enrollment in SEED4909. Intensive on-campus exploration of the principles of curriculum construction, teaching methods, use of community resources, and evaluation as related to teaching vocational business.

Wellness Science

Coeducational Activities

WS1002 Physical Wellness and Fitness

The course provides students with the opportunity to assess their current lifestyle and consider the possible consequences for the present and the future. The class provides a mechanism for change by actively involving the student in self-analysis and a trial exercise program. Two scheduled class meetings and two hours arranged. This course will satisfy two credit hours of PE activity. $10 laboratory fee.

WS1031 Food, Exercise, and Body Composition

The course provides the student with the opportunity to assess their current lifestyle pertaining to the nutrients consumed in the diet and the amount and type of aerobic exercise participation. Special emphasis is placed on developing an internal locus of control by actively involving the student in self-analysis activities, developing an understanding of nutrient intake and the culminating effects on personal health, and participation in an appropriate aerobic exercise program. $10 laboratory fee.

WS1061 Muscle Fitness for Women

Structured to provide for the development of insights and practices associated with resistive activity as the student accomplishes and individually predicted level of muscle fitness. $10 laboratory fee.

WS1081 Muscle Fitness for Men

Structured to provide for the development of insights and practices associated with resistive activity as the student accomplishes an individually predicted level of muscle fitness. $10 laboratory fee.

WS1091 Fitness Walking/Jogging

The course provides the student with the opportunity to assess his or her personal physical fitness level with trained personnel. Special emphasis is placed on improving the physical fitness level of the student through participation in appropriately designed walking or jogging activity. Students who enroll in the class will submit themselves to the physical fitness protocol administered by the HPE and Wellness faculty members and upper-level majors. $10 laboratory fee.

Academic Courses

WS2003 Field-Based Experience in Wellness

The class provides the prospective Wellness/Fitness professional with an opportunity to observe on-site a community-based wellness/fitness agency or business. A combination of classroom and on-site experiences will direct the student's focus to various aspects of commercial or institutional programs and services aimed at lifestyle enhancement. Specific lecture-class meetings and at least 30 hours of observation in an agency or business setting will be required.

WS2031 Directing Food, Exercise, and Body Composition Programs

The course provides the student with the opportunity to assess their current lifestyle pertaining to the nutrients consumed in the diet and the amount and type of aerobic exercise participation. Special emphasis is placed on the methodology of teaching about the development of an internal locus of control by actively involving the student in self-analysis activities, developing an understanding of nutrient intake and the culminating effects on personal health, and participation in an appropriate aerobic exercise program. The course is structured to provide for the development of knowledge and practices of directing food, exercise, and body composition programs employed to accomplish an individually predicted level of physical fitness. $10 laboratory fee.

WS2043 Applied Fitness Assessment and Development

Prerequisites: PE2653 and PE3663. A survey and application of the knowledge and experiences in assessing and developing all components of physical fitness.

WS2081 Directing Muscle Fitness Programs

Structured to provide for the development of knowledge and practices of directing resistance training activities used to accomplish an individually predicted level of muscle fitness. $10 laboratory fee.

WS2091 Directing Fitness Walking/Jogging Programs

The course provides the Wellness/Fitness major student with the opportunity to assess the physical fitness level of individuals under the supervision of trained personnel. The course is structured to provide for the development of knowledge and practices of directing fitness walking and jogging activities employed to accomplish an individually predicted level of aerobic fitness. Students who enroll in the class will submit themselves to the physical fitness protocol as well as help administer various evaluation measures to members of a corresponding wellness activity class. $10 laboratory fee.

WS3003 Exercise Prescription

Prerequisite: WS2043 or consent of instructor. A course designed to expose the student to the aspects of health-related and skill-related physical fitness, with particular attention given to prescribing exercise programs. Attention will be given to choosing appropriate fitness assessments, along with development of appropriate goals for clientele.

WS3023 Exercise Behavior and Adherence

The course provides the student with the opportunity to learn about the components which impact exercise behaviors and adherence to physical exercise programs. Emphasis is placed on the identification of components which directly impact on personal motivation for the development of appropriate exercise behaviors, and the development of incentives which assist in adherence to health enhancement programs.

WS4003 Advanced Professional Seminar

Prerequisite: Completion of all 1000- and 2000-level Wellness Science required classes. This course provides the advanced wellness/fitness major with a setting in which research and contemporary topics critical to the profession may be explored. The student will perform literature research, data gathering, and professional writing/presentation throughout the class.

WS4012 Wellness and Fitness Program Management Internship

(Twelvehour course). Prerequisites: Admission to internship program and 2.00 grade point average. Intensive on-campus classroom exploration of professional principles and procedures used in the areas of health and fitness promotion for the first three weeks of the semester. The remaining portion of the semester is spent in a supervised full-time internship at a designated site. Fee $25.

WS4063 Wellness and Fitness Programming

The course is designed to provide the student with the opportunity to discover various methods employed in planning and implementing wellness and fitness programs in multiple settings. Special emphasis is placed on the administration of client-specific health enhancement programs designed for persons in corporate settings, fitness center clientele, and patients in physical rehabilitation.

WS4991-3 Special Problems in Wellness Science

Independent work on approved wellness science topics under the individual guidance of a faculty member. Admission requires the consent of the department head.



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