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Contents
Agriculture
Computer and Information Science
Engineering
Mathematics
Parks, Recreation, and Hospitality Administration
Index



School of Systems Science

The School of Systems Science is designed to bring together those courses of study which relate directly to the design, improvement, and operation of the socioeconomic systems of which contemporary society is composed. Systems Science focuses on areas of effectiveness as opposed to orientation along narrow lines of specialization. This philosophy is in keeping with the great need for a new generation of thinkers-professionals who view things in our world not just as objects or phenomena, but as systems and who utilize the systems approach to problems.



Dr. Jack R. Hamm, Dean
Corley Building, Room 112
Telephone: (501) 968-0353
Email: Jack.Hamm@mail.atu.edu

Programs of study within the school offer the student an opportunity to specialize in a chosen field of study, while at the same time providing a broad perspective and understanding of the structure, nature, and functions of the real-life systems which will ultimately make use of his/her training. It is also an objective of each curriculum to provide students with a well-rounded general education in addition to the thoroughly professional program within the major. Each curriculum in the School is thus characterized by these facets:

  1. Contemporary professional training tailored to be commensurate with standards of the professional accrediting institution of the discipline,
  2. A basic series of courses in the liberal arts, and
  3. Seminars and courses in analysis which are designed to train students to view elements of our society from the systems vantage.

Systems Science stresses the need for interdisciplinary efforts toward the solutions of problems. The school is developing educational programs that will help its students excel as professionals in a society which demands an ever increasing understanding of all its activities and interrelationships.

An "undeclared" program is available for freshman and sophomore students who have not selected a specific major. Students work through a general studies coordinator for counseling and guidance (see Selecting a Major Field).

The School of Systems Science offers programs of study leading to baccalaureate and associate degrees as listed below. Complete requirements for each degree will be found under the respective departmental section. Those students interested in obtaining teacher certification in conjunction with one of these degrees should also refer to the School of Education section of this catalog.

  1. Bachelor of Science
    1. Agriculture Business with Horticulture Business and Animal Science options
    2. Computer Science with Information Science and Computer Science options
    3. Hospitality Administration
    4. Mathematics
    5. Recreation and Park Administration
  2. Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering
    1. Electrical Engineering
    2. Electrical Engineering with Computer Option
  3. Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering
    1. Mechanical Engineering
  4. Bachelor of Science in Engineering
    1. Engineering with electrical and mechanical engineering elective blocks
  5. Associate of Science in Nuclear Technology
    1. Nuclear Technology

Department of Agriculture
Dr. Kenneth Pippin, Head
Dean Hall, Suite 123
Telephone: (501) 968-0251
Email: Kenneth.Pippin@mail.atu.edu
Professors: Collins, Pippin
Associate Professors: Bateman, Hodgson

The Agriculture Department includes programs of study as follows:

  1. A four-year curriculum in agriculture business, with horticulture-business and animal science options, leading to a bachelor of science degree.
  2. The courses in pre-veterinary medicine. In this curriculum all requirements are offered for entrance into Louisiana State University, University of Missouri, Oklahoma State University, Tuskegee Institute, and other institutions offering the D.V.M. degree.
  3. The courses in pre-forestry. Offerings here are designed to meet requirements for U of A at Monticello, but may be tailored to requirements of other institutions.

Objectives of the department include:

  1. Provide a balanced educational program with relatively broad interdisciplinary training as opposed to narrow specialization, thus preparing the student for success in his/her chosen field and in his/her citizenship responsibilities.
  2. Serve and assist the student in educational and personal problems through active faculty counseling.
  3. Assist the student in development and improvement of leadership abilities through encouragement of active participation in activities of the Agri Club, FFA Day and other extra-curricular activities.

The baccalaureate degree program in agri-business integrates the discipline of agriculture, business, accounting, economics, and finance. Emphasis is placed on management directed toward the farm business and agri-business firms.

Trends in occupations related to agriculture are shifting from production to agri-business services such as management, processing, distribution, and marketing. This creates a need for personnel with a broad background in these areas of training. Our systems concept is geared to integration of disciplines to better prepare graduates for present day needs.

Attractive career opportunities exist in agricultural business firms, banks and other financial agencies, marketing, food processing, extension, soil conservation, forestry, farm and agri-business management, and sales and distribution firms.

The curricula which follow represent the program of study for the four-year degree in agri-business, including the horticulture-business and animal science options, and typical plans of study for those pursuing a pre-forestry, or pre-veterinary medicine program. Students enrolled in programs other than agri-business may want to tailor their curriculum to best meet their individual needs.
Curriculum in Agriculture Business
Freshman YearFallSpring
English Composition I, II (ENGL 1013, 1023)133
Introduction to Biological Science (BIOL 1014)4
A Survey of Chemistry (CHEM 1114)4
Physical Education11
Elective3
Principles of Animal Science (AGAS 1013) 3
Field Crops (AGPS 1003) 3
Mathematics (MATH 1103)1 3
Microcomputer Applications (COMS 2003) 3
Total     1515
 
Sophomore Year
Accounting Principles (ACCT 2003, 2013)33
Social Sciences133
Legal Environment of Business (BUAD 2033)3
Introduction to Agriculture Economics (AGBU 2063)3
Business and Professional Speaking (SPH 2173)3
Physical Education11
Principles of Agriculture Economics (AGBU 2073) 3
Soils (AGSS 2013) 3
Feeds and Feeding (AGAS 2083) 3
Total     1615
 
Junior Year
Agriculture Elective (3000-4000 level)36
Social Sciences133
Plant Pathology (AGPS 3244)4
Agricultural Marketing (AGBU 4013)3
Fine Arts13
Statistics (MATH 2163) 3
Agricultural Waste Management (AGEG 3413) 3
Total     1615
 
Senior Year
Agricultural Electives (3000 - 4000 level)69
Electives244
Agri Business Management (AGBU 4003)3
Humanities13
Agriculture Finance (AGBU 4023) 3
Total     1616


Notes:
1See General Education requirements. (Except ECON 2003)
2Recommended electives are SPAN 1014 and SPAN 1024.


Curriculum in Agriculture Business
(Horticulture Business Option)
Freshman YearFallSpring
English Composition I, II (ENGL 1013, 1023)133
Principles of Botany (BIOL 1134) or Introduction to Biological Science (BIOL 1014)4
A Survey of Chemistry (CHEM 1114) 4
General Horticulture (AGPS 1023) 3
Field Crops (AGPS 1003) 3
Mathematics (MATH 1103)13
Elective3
Physical Education11
Microcomputer Applications (COMS 2003) 3
Total     1416
 
Sophomore Year
Introduction to Agriculture Economics (AGBU 2063)3
Principles of Agriculture Economics (AGBU 2073) 3
Legal Environment of Business (BUAD 2033) 3
Accounting Principles (ACCT 2003, 2013)33
Business and Professional Speaking (SPH 2173)3
Soils (AGSS 2013) 3
Greenhouse Management (AGPS 2023)3
Social Science133
Physical Education11
Total     1615
 
Junior Year
Agriculture Elective (3000-4000 level) 3
Electives2 4
Agricultural Marketing (AGBU 4013)3
Statistics (MATH 2163) 3
Vegetable Growing (AGPS 3063) 3
Plant Pathology (AGPS 3244)4
Plant Propagation (AGPS 3043)3
Social Science133
Fine Arts13
Total     1616
 
Senior Year
Agri Business Management (AGBU 4003)3
Weeds and Weed Control (AGPS 3053) 3
Floriculture (AGPS 3073)3
Crop and Garden Insects (AGPS 4103) 3
Small Fruit and Nut Culture (AGPS 3083)3
Humanities13
Dendrology (BIOL 4044) 4
Agricultural Electives236
Total     1516

Notes:
1See General Education requirements. (Except ECON 2003)
2Six hours must be 3000 - 4000 level.


Curriculum in Agriculture Business
(Animal Science Option)
Freshman YearFallSpring
English Composition I, II (ENGL 1013, 1023)133
General Chemistry I, II (CHEM 2124, 2134)44
Introduction to Biological Science (BIOL 1014) or Principles of Zoology (BIOL 1124) 4
Principles of Animal Science (AGAS 1013) 3
Principles of Animal Science Laboratory (AGAS 1001) 1
Mathematics (MATH 1103)13
Elective3
Electives23
Physical Education1 1
Total     1616
 
Sophomore Year
Business and Professional Speaking (SPH 2173)3
Feeds and Feeding (AGAS 2083) 3
Introduction to Agriculture Economics (AGBU 2063)3
Principles of Agriculture Economics (AGBU 2073) 3
Statistics (MATH 2163) 3
Soils (AGSS 2013) 3
Social Science133
Legal Environment of Business (BUAD 2033)3
Microcomputer Applications (COMS 2003)3
Physical Education11
Total     1615
 
Junior Year
Social Science133
Principles of Accounting I, II (ACCT 2003, 2013)33
Beef Cattle Management (AGAS 3013) 3
Light Horse Production (AGAS 3113)3
Fine Arts1 3
Microbiology (BIOL 3054) 4
Swine Management (AGAS 3103)3
Reproduction in Farm Animals (AGAS 3003)3
Total     1516
 
Senior Year
Agri Business Management (AGBU 4003)3
Agricultural Marketing (AGBU 4013) 3
Humanities1 3
Agriculture Finance (AGBU 4023) 3
Animal Nutrition (AGAS 4203)3
Electives263
Poultry Science (AGAS 3303, 3323, 3333, or 4303)33
Total     1515

Notes:
1See General Education requirements. (Except ECON 2003)
2Six hours must be 3000 - 4000 level.


Curriculum in Pre-Forestry
Freshman YearFallSpring
English Composition I, II (ENGL 1013, 1023)133
General Chemistry I, II (CHEM 2124, 2134)44
Principles of Botany (BIOL 1134)4
College Algebra (MATH 1113)3
Plane Trigonometry (MATH 1203) 3
Engineering Graphics (ENGR 1002)2
Electives2 5-6
Physical Education1 1
Total     1616-17
 
Sophomore Year
Introduction to Forestry (AGPS 1033)3
Soils (AGSS 2013) 3
Physical Principles (PHYS 2014)4
Introduction to Agriculture Economics (AGBU 2063)3
Dendrology (BIOL 4044) 4
Plant Taxonomy (BIOL 3004) 4
Public Speaking (SPH 2003)3
Electives23-45-6
Physical Education11
Total     17-1816-17

Notes:
1See General Education requirements.
2Suggested electives: POLS 2003; HIST 2003, 2013; AGPS 3244; PSY 2003; SOC 1003; PHIL 2003; HLED 1513; PE 2513.


Curriculum in Pre-Veterinary Medicine1
Freshman YearFallSpring
English Composition I, II (ENGL 1013, 1023)433
Principles of Biology (BIOL 1114)4
Principles of Animal Science (AGAS 1013)3
Feeds and Feeding (AGAS 2083) 3
College Algebra (MATH 1113)3
Plane Trigonometry (MATH 1203) 3
Public Speaking (SPH 2003)3
Social Science2,4 3
Principles of Zoology (BIOL 1124) 4
Total     1616
 
Sophomore Year
General Chemistry I, II (CHEM 2124, 2134)344
Genetics (BIOL 3034) 4
Animal Science or Poultry Science2 3
Physical Principles (PHYS 2014, 2024)44
Elective23
Microcomputer Applications (COMS 2003)3
Total     1415
 
Junior Year
Organic Chemistry (CHEM 3254)4
Vertebrate Histology (BIOL 4054)4
Microbiology (BIOL 3054) 4
Principles of Biochemistry (CHEM 3343) 3
Animal Nutrition (AGAS 4203) 3
Social Science or Humanities2,433
Medical Terminology (AHS 2013)3
Total     1413

Notes:
1Most entering pre-veterinary medicine students complete at least three years of preparatory course work or a baccalaureate degree. Students will be permitted to make substitutions to meet requirements of a particular institution.
Louisiana State University requires a minimum of 69 hours to be eligible for admission.
University of Missouri requires 10 hours of social science and/or humanities.
Tuskegee Institute requires 3 hours of political science, 3 hours of history, and 3 hours of humanities for social science.
2In consultation with advisor.
3Depending upon previous preparation, student may wish to complete Survey of Chemistry (CHEM 1114) before enrolling in General Chemistry. However, students who subsequently change their major to a program leading to a degree will not receive duplicate credit for CHEM 1114 and CHEM 2124 or 2134.
4See General Education requirements.

Department of Computer and Information Science
Larry Morell, Head
Corley Building, Room 262
Telephone: (501) 968-0663
Email: Larry.Morell@mail.atu.edu
Associate Professors: J. Hendrix, Hoelzeman, Morell, R. Robison
Assistant Professors: Middleton, S. Robison
Instructor: Moody

The computer and information science curriculum offers two options leading to the bachelor of science degree. Both options enable the student to study computer science in a setting that utilizes a variety of state-of-the-art computer equipment and technology.

The information science option is intended for students pursuing a career as an application programmer/analyst in a business information systems environment, or who plan to continue the study of information systems in graduate school. This option requires substantial course work in business.

The computer science option is intended for students pursuing a career as a systems programmer, an application programmer in a scientific or an engineering environment, or who plan to continue the study of computer science in graduate school. This option requires substantial course work in mathematics and engineering.

Curriculum in Computer and Information Science
(Information Science Option)
Freshman YearFallSpring
Science144
English Composition I, II (ENGL 1013, 1023)133
Computer and Information Science Orientation (COMS 1403)3
Microcomputer Applications (COMS 2003) 3
Foundations of Computer Programming I (COMS 2103) 3
Calculus for Business and Economics (MATH 2243) 3
College Algebra (MATH 1113)3
Social Sciences13
Physical Education1 1
Total     1617
 
Sophomore Year
Foundation of Computer Programming II (COMS 2203)3
Data Structures (COMS 2213) 3
Computer Organization and Programming (COMS 2223)3
Computer Science Elective2 3
Technical Communication (ENGL 2053)3
Business Statistics (BUAD 2053) 3
Principles of Economics I (ECON 2003)3
Business and Professional Speaking (SPH 2173) 3
Accounting Principles I, II (ACCT 2003, 2013)33
Physical Education1 1
Total     1516
 
Junior Year
Application Program Development I, II (COMS 3033, 3043)33
Database Concepts (COMS 4203) 3
Systems Software and Architecture (COMS 4903)3
Social Sciences133
Accounting Elective 3
Visual Programming (COMS 3503) 3
Management and Organizational Behavior (MGMT 3003)3
Data Communications and Networks (COMS 4703)3
Total     1515
 
Senior Year
Systems Analysis and Design I, II (COMS 4033, 4043)33
Computer Science Elective (3000-4000 level) 3
Client/Server Systems (COMS 4303)3
Principles of Marketing (MKT 3043)3
Human Behavior in Organizations (MGMT 4093) 3
Elective (3000-4000 level)33
Humanities13
Fine Arts1 3
Total     1515


Notes:
1See General Education requirements.
21000-level courses may not be used to satisfy this requirement.


Curriculum in Computer Science
(Computer Science Option)
Freshman YearFallSpring
English Composition I, II (1013, 1023)133
Computer and Information Science Orientation (COMS 1403)3
Social Sciences133
Microcomputer Application (COMS 2003) 3
Science14
Foundations of Computer Programming I (COMS 2103) 3
Calculus I & II (MATH 2914, 2924)44
Total     1716
 
Sophomore Year
Foundations of Computer Programming II (COMS 2203)3
Data Structures (COMS 2213) 3
Computer Organization and Programming (COMS 2223) 3
Computer Science Elective2 3
Discrete Math (MATH 2703)3
Science14
Linear Algebra I (MATH 4003) 3
Business and Professional Speaking (SPH 2173) 3
Digital Logic Design (ENGR 2134)4
Technical Communication (ENGL 2053)3
Physical Education1 1
Total     1716
 
Junior Year
Application Program Development I, II (COMS 3033, 3043)33
Accounting Principles I, II (ACCT 2003, 2013)33
Advanced Data Structures (COMS 3213)3
Operating Systems (COMS 3703)3
Organization of Programming Languages (COMS 4103) 3
Humanities1 3
Fine Arts13
Physical Education1 1
Database Concepts (COMS 4203) 3
Total     1516
 
Senior Year
Systems Analysis and Design I, II (COMS 4033, 4043)33
Compiler Design (COMS 4403)3
Computer Science Elective (3000-4000 level) 3
Microprocessor System Design (ENGR 3133)3
Digital Systems Lab (ENGR 4111) 1
Applied Statistics I, II (MATH 3153, 4153)33
Social Sciences133
Total     1513

Notes:
1See General Education requirements.
21000-level courses may not be used to satisfy this requirement.

Kingston College - In addition to the program offered on the Russellville campus, Arkansas Tech University offers the junior and senior-level courses leading to a baccalaureate degree in computer science (information science option only) through Kingston College in Vancouver, British Columbia. The program is designed so that freshman and sophomore-level courses are provided by Kingston College, and the junior and senior-level courses leading to the four-year degree are provided by Arkansas Tech University.

Curriculum in Computer Science
Information Science Option (Kingston Campus)
Freshman YearWinterSpringFall
IIIIIIIII
Introduction to Computing (CPSC 110)3     
Principles of Computer Programming I, II (CPSC 150, CPSC 220)   33  
Science (BIOL 110, 220; CHEM 110; CHEM 120)   4 4 
Communications (ENGL 150, ENGL 160) 33    
College Algebra (MATH 100) 3     
Social Studies (PSY 110)   3   
U.S. Social Studies (HIST 100 or HIST 130 or HIST 140)     3 
Physical Education (PE 100)     
Total     34
 
Sophomore Year
Data Structures and Algorithm (CPSC 320)3     
Computer Organization/Architecture (CPSC 340)3     
Humanities (PHIL 110 or ENGL 210)  3   
Social Studies (HIST 110 or HIST 120)  3   
Math with Appl in Business and Economics (MATH 240)  3   
Statistics (MATH 230)  3   
Introduction to Macroeconomics (ECON 120)  3   
Public Speaking (PSP 110)    3 
Principles of Accounting I, II (ACCT 110, ACCT 120)33    
Total     30
 
Junior Year
Appl Program Development I, II (COMS 3033, COMS 3043)33    
Visual Programming (COMS 3503)  3   
Database Concepts (COMS 4203)  3   
Data Communications and Networks (COMS 4703)3     
Systems Software and Architecture (COMS 4903)3     
Computer Science Elective (3000-4000 level)  3   
Approved Accounting Elective (3000-4000 level)  3   
Technical Writing (COMU 250)    3 
Approved Business Elective (3000-4000 level)    3 
Total     30
 
Senior Year
Systems Analysis and Design I, II (COMS 4033, COMS 4043)33    
Client/Server Systems (COMS 4303)3     
Computer Science Elective (3000-4000 level)  3   
Computer Science Elective (3000-4000 level)  3   
Approved Business Elective (3000-4000 level)3     
Approved Business Elective (3000-4000 level)  3   
Elective (3000-4000 level)  3 3 
Fine Arts    3 
Total     30


University Center - In addition to the program offered on the Russellville campus, Arkansas Tech University offers the junior- and senior-level courses leading to a baccalaureate degree in computer science (information science option only) through the University Center located on the campus of Westark Community College in Fort Smith, Arkansas. The program is designed so that freshman- and sophomore-level courses are provided by Westark Community College, and the junior-and senior-level courses leading to the four-year degree are provided by Arkansas Tech University.

For further information, contact the Arkansas Tech University program director at the University Center (788-7901) or the Department of Computer and Information Science at Arkansas Tech University (968-0355).

University Center Curriculum In Computer Science
Information Science Option (Westark Campus)
Freshman YearFallSpring
Computers and Their Applications (CIS 1203)3
Computer Programming I, II (CISR 1223, 1803)33
English Composition I, II (1203, 1213)133
College Algebra (MATH 1403)13
Science44
Microcomputer Software Applications (CISP 2033) 3
Social Sciences1 3
Physical Education1 1
Total     1617
 
Sophomore Year
Data Structures (CISR 2313)3
Survey of Calculus (MATH 2403)3
Principles of Accounting I, II (ACCT 2803, 2813)33
Social Sciences13
Humanities1 3
Assembler Programming (CISR 2803) 3
Introduction to Speech Communication (SPCH 1203) 3
Business Statistics (BUGE 2963) 3
Principles of Economics (Macro) (ECON 2803)3
Physical Education1 1
Total     1516
 
Junior Year
Application Program Development I, II (COMS 3033, 3043)33
Visual Programming (COMS 3503) 3
Database Concepts (COMS 4203) 3
Technical Writing (RHET 3316) 3
Data Communications & Networks (COMS 4703)3
System Software and Architecture (COMS 4903)3
Approved Business Elective (3000-4000 level)3
Approved Accounting Elective (3000-4000 level) 3
Social Sciences13
Total     1515
 
Senior Year
Systems Analysis and Design I, II (COMS 4033, 4043)33
Computer Science Elective (3000-4000 level)33
Approved Business Elective (3000-4000 level)33
Fine Arts1 3
Client/Server Systems (COMS 4303)3
General Elective (3000-4000 level)33
Total     1515


Notes:
1See General Education requirements.

Department of Engineering
Dr. John L. Krohn, Head
Corley Building, Room 263
Telephone: (501) 968-0663
Professor: Culp
Associate Professors: Helmer, Krohn, Nelson, Richards
Assistant Professor: Clark, Falkner, Fithen
Instructors: S. Apple, Hartman

The Department of Engineering offers four-year degree programs leading to the degrees Bachelor of Science in Engineering (BSEg), Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering (BSEE),and Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering (BSME), and a two-year degree in Nuclear Technology. Within the BSEg program, students may choose to concentrate their studies in either the electrical or mechanical area. Within the BSEE program, students may choose to complete the traditional program or the computer option. The program leading to the Bachelor of Science in Engineering (BSEg) degree is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission (EAC) of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET).

Mission Statement
The mission of the Department of Engineering at Arkansas Tech University is to develop and maintain accredited programs leading to a bachelor of science degree in various fields of engineering. The department is committed to providing its students with a positive atmosphere in which to learn the fundamentals of engineering practice including engineering science and design. The department's programs emphasize the need for continued learning throughout every engineer's career. Through its faculty and activities, the department encourages involvement in professional activities, experimental learning, and professional licensure.

Engineering Programs
The department's engineering programs are designed to help satisfy the engineering manpower needs of industry in Arkansas and the mid-south region. The objectives of the program are to produce graduates with a professional attitude and approach to problem solving, well educated in the basics of engineering. The required courses provide a basic foundation in engineering with a strong cross-disciplinary component and emphasis on engineering design.

The emphasis on cross-disciplinary work and engineering design begins in the first year with the Introduction to Engineering course in which typical problems from both areas (Electrical and Mechanical engineering) are presented in a manner appropriate to the freshman student. An introduction to the profession of engineering including licensing, registration, and the Engineering Code of Ethics is included in this first course. The course concludes with a design competition to introduce the students to engineering design. The cross-disciplinary training continues in the second year through the basic courses of both a traditional EE and ME degree. Engineering design is integrated into the curricula by project work in courses such as Digital Logic Design and Mechanics of Materials. In the junior year, the student begins to concentrate in either the electrical or mechanical area while continuing to take courses in the other area. Design is incorporated in several of the Junior level courses by means of open-ended problems, team projects, and individual projects. The senior year is composed of mainly discipline specific courses with more design experiences via team and individual projects. The curriculum culminates in the senior design project in which individuals or teams of students bring together knowledge from many classes and complete a project design including both an oral and written report addressing all aspects of the design process including safety, environmental concerns, reliability, longevity, ease of manufacturing, maintainability, and cost effectiveness.

Pre-Professional Curriculum
Prior to enrolling in any 3000 or 4000-level engineering courses, students must complete a pre-professional curriculum containing preparatory courses normally taken during the first three semesters. The pre-professional curriculum is composed of the following courses:

  1. ENGL 1013 and 1023 (or equivalent)
  2. MATH 2914, 2924
  3. CHEM 2124
  4. PHYS 2114

Satisfactory completion of the pre-professional curriculum is defined as a grade of "C" or better in each course or, alternatively, grade point average of 2.20 or greater for the courses comprising the pre-professional curriculum. Students should meet with their advisor during the semester in which they anticipate completing the pre-professional curriculum to complete the procedure for admittance to upper-level engineering classes. By that time the student is expected to declare a major within engineering (BSEg, BSEE, BSME).

Most graduates of the engineering programs go directly into the work force as practicing engineers. Many are placed in the numerous small manufacturers in the River Valley area. Others have obtained positions with larger companies such as Texas Instruments, Motorola, and Entergy. A number of graduates have elected to attend one of many different graduate schools specializing in disciplines such as engineering (electrical, mechanical, industrial or nuclear), mathematics, physics and business.

The following curricula represent the programs of study for the bachelor of science degrees as indicated.

Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering (BSEE)
Freshman YearFallSpring
Introduction To Engineering (ENGR 1012)2
Engineering Graphics (ENGR 1002)2
Physical Education11
Biological Science14
English Composition I, II (ENGL 1013, 1023)133
Calculus I, II (MATH 2914, 2924)44
Foundations of Computer Programming I (COMS 2103) 3
General Chemistry (CHEM 2124) 4
Principles of Economics I (ECON 2003) 3
Total     1617
 
Sophomore Year
Calculus III (MATH 2934)4
Statics (ENGR 2013)3
Fine Arts3
Social Sciences13
Physics I, II (PHYS 2114, 2124)44
Digital Logic Design (ENGR 2134) 4
Electric Circuits I (ENGR 2103) 3
Dynamics (ENGR 2033) 3
Differential Equations (MATH 3243) 3
Total     1717
 
Junior Year
Electric Circuits II (ENGR 2113)3
Electric Circuits Laboratory (ENGR 2111)1
Mechanics of Materials (ENGR 3013)3
Physical Education11
Engineering Modeling & Design (ENGR 3003)3
Applied Statistics (MATH 3153)3
Humanities13
Microcontrollers (ENGR 3223) 3
Signals and Systems (ENGR 3123) 3
Electronics I (ENGR 3103) 3
Electromagnetics (ENGR 3143) 3
Electrical Machines (ENGR 3153) 3
Electronics Lab (ENGR 3131) 1
Electrical Machines Lab (ENGR 3151) 1
Total     1717
 
Senior Year
Communications Systems I (ENGR 4143)3
Engineering Design (ENGR 4202)2
Electronics II (ENGR 4103)3
Digital Signal Processing (ENGR 4113)3
Thermodynamics I (ENGR 3313)3
Social Science133
Digital Systems Laboratory(ENGR 4111) 1
Modern Control Systems (ENGR 4314) 4
Communications Systems II (ENGR 4153) 3
ASIC Design (ENGR 4133) 3
Design Project (ENGR 4193) 3
Total     1717


Notes:
1See General Education requirements.


Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering-Computer Option (BSEE)
Freshman YearFallSpring
Introduction To Engineering (ENGR 1012)2
Biological Science14
Foundations of Computer Programming I (COMS 2103)3
Physical Education11
English Composition I, II (ENGL 1013, 1023)133
Calculus I, II (MATH 2914, 2924)44
Principles of Economics I (ECON 2003) 3
General Chemistry (CHEM 2124) 4
Foundations of Computer Programming II (COMS 2203) 3
Total     1717
 
Sophomore Year
Data Structures (COMS 2213)3
Calculus III (MATH 2934)4
Statics (ENGR 2013)3
Digital Logic Design (ENGR 2134)4
Physics I, II (PHYS 2114, 2124)44
Physical Education1 1
Machanics of Materials (ENGR 3013) 3
Electric Circuits I (ENGR 2103) 3
Computer Organization and Programming (COMS 2223) 3
Differential Equations (MATH 3243) 3
Total     1817
 
Junior Year
Electric Circuits II (ENGR 2113)3
Electric Circuits Laboratory (ENGR 2111)1
Operating Systems (COMS 3703)3
Applied Statistics (MATH 3153)3
Social Science13
Fine Arts13
Humanities1 3
Microprocessor Systems (ENGR 3133) 3
Digital Systems Lab (ENGR 4111) 1
Signals and Systems (ENGR 3123) 3
Electronics I (ENGR 3103) 3
Electronics Lab (ENGR 3131) 1
Thermodynamics I (ENGR 3313) 3
Total     1617
 
Senior Year
Communications Systems I (ENGR 4143)3
Engineering Design (ENGR 4202)2
Electronics II (ENGR 4103)3
Digital Signal Processing (ENGR 4113)3
Data Communications and Networks (COMS 4703)3
Social Science133
Modern Control Systems (ENGR 4314) 4
Communications Systems II (ENGR 4153) 3
ASIC Design (ENGR 4133) 3
Design Project (ENGR 4193) 3
Total     1716

Notes:
1See General Education requirements.


Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering (BSME)
Freshman YearFallSpring
Introduction To Engineering (ENGR 1012)2
Engineering Graphics (ENGR 1002)2
Biological Science14
Physical Education11
English Composition I, II (ENGL 1013, 1023)133
Calculus I, II (MATH 2914, 2924)44
Principles of Economics I (ECON 2003) 3
General Chemistry (CHEM 2124) 4
Foundations of Computer Programming I (COMS 2103) 3
Total     1617
 
Sophomore Year
Calculus III (MATH 2934)4
Statics (ENGR 2013)3
Engineering Materials (ENGR 2023)3
Social Science13
Physics I, II (PHYS 2114, 2124)44
Mechanics of Materials (ENGR 3013) 3
Electric Circuits I (ENGR 2103) 3
Dynamics (ENGR 2033) 3
Differential Equations (MATH 3243) 3
Total     1716
 
Junior Year
Electric Circuits II (ENGR 2113)3
Electric Circuits Laboratory (ENGR 2111)1
Fine Arts13
Mechanical Lab I (ENGR 3442)2
Physical Education11
Thermodynamics I (ENGR 3313)3
Applied Statistics (MATH 3153)3
Social Science1 3
Humanities1 3
Electronics I (ENGR 3103) 3
Engineering Modeling & Design (ENGR 3003) 3
Engineering Elective3 3
Engineering Laboratory Elective(s)2 2
Total     1617
 
Senior Year
Engineering Design (ENGR 4202)2
Heat Transfer (ENGR 4443)3
Thermodynamics II (ENGR 4433)3
Mechanics of Fluids and Hydraulics (ENGR 4403)3
Control Systems I (ENGR 4303)3
Fundamentals of Mechanical Design (ENGR 3413)3
Social Science1 3
Engineering Elective3 6
Mechanical Laboratory II (ENGR 3442) 2
Machine Component Design (ENGR 4423) 3
Design Project (ENGR 4493) 3
Total     1717

Notes:
1See General Education requirements.
2ENGR 3131 - Electronics Lab & ENGR 3151 - Electrical Machines Lab OR ENGR 3512 - Radiation Detection Lab.
33000-level or above ENGR course with minimum of six (6) hours at the 4000-level and approval of advisor.


Bachelor of Science in Engineering (BSEg)
Freshman YearFallSpring
Introduction To Engineering (ENGR 1012)2
Engineering Graphics (ENGR 1002)2
Biological Science14
Physical Education11
English Composition I, II (ENGL 1013, 1023)133
Calculus I, II (MATH 2914, 2924)44
Principles of Economics I (ECON 2003) 3
General Chemistry (CHEM 2124) 4
Foundations of Computer Programming I (COMS 2103) 3
Total     1617
 
Sophomore Year
Calculus III (MATH 2934)4
Statics (ENGR 2013)3
Engineering Materials (ENGR 2023)3
Digital Logic Design (ENGR 2134)4
Physics I, II (PHYS 2114, 2124)44
Mechanics of Materials (ENGR 3013) 3
Electric Circuits I (ENGR 2103) 3
Dynamics (ENGR 2033) 3
Differential Equations (MATH 3243) 3
Total     1816
 
Junior Year
Electric Circuits II (ENGR 2113)3
Electric Circuits Laboratory (ENGR 2111)1
Mechanical Laboratory I (ENGR 3442)2
Physical Education11
Thermodynamics I (ENGR 3313)3
Applied Statistics (MATH 3153)3
Engineering Electives233
Social Sciences1 3
Engineering Modeling & Design (ENGR 3003) 3
Electrical Machines (ENGR 3153) 3
Electronics I (ENGR 3103) 3
Engineering Laboratory Elective 2
Total     1617
 
Senior Year
Engineering Design (ENGR 4202)2
Mechanics of Fluids and Hydraulics (ENGR 4403)3
Fine Arts13
Engineering Electives263
Social Sciences133
Humanities1 3
Control Systems (ENGR 4303 OR ENGR 4314)2 3-4
Engineering Laboratory Elective (ENGR 4442 OR ENGR 4111)2 2-1
Design Project (ENGR 4193 OR ENGR 4493) 3
Total     1717

Notes:
1See General Education requirements.
2See engineering elective requirements below.

Engineering Electives
Each student completing the BSEg degree must complete 18 semester hours of engineering electives, with a minimum of 10 semester hours of 4000-level engineering courses. In selecting courses to fulfill the engineering elective hours, the student shall work with his advisor to develop a cohesive set of courses within one of the concentration areas below. Choice of engineering electives is subject to the approval of the student's advisor and department head.

Electrical Block

  1. ENGR 3123 Signals and Systems
  2. ENGR 3131 Electronics Lab
  3. ENGR 3133 Microprocessor Systems Design
  4. ENGR 3143 Electromagnetics
  5. ENGR 3151 Electrical Machines Lab
  6. ENGR 3223 Microcontrollers
  7. ENGR 4103 Electronics II
  8. ENGR 4111 Digital Systems Lab
  9. ENGR 4113 Digital Signal Processing
  10. ENGR 4133 ASIC Design
  11. ENGR 4143 Communication Systems I
  12. ENGR 4153 Communication Systems II

Mechanical Block

  1. ENGR 3131 Electronics Lab
  2. ENGR 3151 Electrical Machines Lab
  3. ENGR 3403 Machine Dynamics and Vibrations
  4. ENGR 3413 Fundamentals of Mechanical Design
  5. ENGR 3503 Basic Nuclear Engineering
  6. ENGR 3512 Radiation Detection Lab
  7. ENGR 3523 Radiation Health Physics
  8. ENGR 4323 Power Plant Systems
  9. ENGR 4413 Finite Element Analysis
  10. ENGR 4423 Machine Component Design
  11. ENGR 4433 Thermodynamics II
  12. ENGR 4442 Mechanical Laboratory II
  13. ENGR 4443 Heat Transfer
  14. ENGR 4463 HVAC Design

Substitution of other courses into the above blocks may be considered on an individual basis. Such substitutions will require the approval of the student's advisor and the head of the department.

Transfer of Credit
Students wishing to transfer into one of the programs offered by the Department of Engineering are urged to contact the department head as soon as possible to reduce the possibility of taking non-transferable courses. Course work taken at another institution must meet the requirements of the Arkansas Tech University transfer policies and, in addition, is subject to the current transfer policy of the Department of Engineering. Contact the department for the latest course transfer information and policy.

Students planning to transfer to another university can, in most cases, complete the first two years of work at Arkansas Tech University. Students who plan to transfer should consult with the school to which they plan to transfer to coordinate details.

Nuclear Technology
The department also offers a two-year program leading to the Associate of Science in Nuclear Technology (ASNT). This degree is designed to allow the student to obtain the knowledge base and training necessary to work in one of many areas in the nuclear field. While many technology degrees, especially at the associate's level, are seen as less rigorous paths, the ASNT degree at Arkansas Tech includes most of the same courses as the first two years of the engineering programs.

Graduates of the program leading to the Associate of Science degree in Nuclear Technology will find employment in many areas of the nuclear industry. Many of our past ASNT graduates have gone on to obtain bachelors degrees in engineering or the physical sciences either at Tech or at other institutions.

Curriculum in Nuclear Technology
Freshman YearFallSpring
Introduction To Engineering (ENGR 1012)2
Engineering Graphics (ENGR 1002)2
Social Sciences13
General Chemistry (CHEM 2124)4
English Composition I, II (ENGL 1013, 1023)133
Calculus I, II (MATH 2914, 2924)44
Engineering Materials (ENGR 2023) 3
Technical Elective2 6
Physical Education1 1
Total     1817
 
Sophomore Year
Statics (ENGR 2013)3
Calculus III (MATH 2934)4
Basic Nuclear Engineering (ENGR 3503)3
Thermodynamics I (ENGR 3313)3
General Physics I, II (PHYS 2114, 2124)44
Dynamics (ENGR 2033) 3
Radiation Detection Laboratory (ENGR 3512) 2
Electric Circuits I (ENGR 2103) 3
Radiation Health Physics (ENGR 3523) 3
Physical Education1 1
Total     1716


Notes:
1See General Education requirements.
2Mathematics, science, or engineering elective must be approved by an Engineering advisor and the Engineering Department Head.

Department of Mathematics
Dr. John W. Watson, Head
Corley Building, Room 232
Telephone: (501) 968-0602
Email: John.Watson@mail.atu.edu
Professors: Carnahan, Hamm, Keisler, Watson
Associate Professors: Amirkhanian, S. Jordan, C. Pearson, Shores
Assistant Professors: J. Hemmati, K. Pearson
Instructors: Felkins, Horton, S.M. Jordan, Lloyd, Sherrill, Tibbs

The Department of Mathematics offers a four-year program in mathematics that leads to the bachelor of science degree. The curriculum is designed to meet the needs of three groups of students: (1) those who plan to seek employment in business, industry, or government, (2) those who plan to attend graduate school to continue their study of mathematics or a related field, and (3) those who plan to be secondary school teachers.

Students majoring in mathematics are encouraged to use their elective hours to complete a second major, or at least a concentration of 18 hours or more, in the field of their choice. For example, students interested in computer science are advised to complete the following courses: COMS 1403, 2003, 2103, 2203, 2213, and two additional courses selected from 3213, 3503, 3803, and 4203. Students interested in business electives are advised to complete BUAD 2003, 2033, ACCT 2003, 2013, and ECON 2003 and 2013. For other areas of interest, students should consult their advisor to arrange a plan of study.

Students who plan to attend graduate school in mathematics or a related field are advised to complete additional upper-level mathematics courses beyond the minimal degree requirements.

The curriculum in mathematics for teacher certification is found in the School of Education section of this catalog.

Curriculum in Mathematics
Freshman YearHours
Calculus I, II (MATH 2914, 2924)8
English Composition I, II (ENGL 1013, 1023)16
Social Sciences16
Introduction to Biological Science (BIOL 1014)14
Physical Education12
Electives6
Total32
 
Sophomore Year
Calculus III (MATH 2934)4
Discrete Mathematics (MATH 2703)3
Differential Equations I (MATH 3243)3
General Physics I, II (PHYS 2114, 2124)8
Foundations of Computer Programming I (COMS 2103)3
Social Sciences16
Electives13
Total30
 
Junior Year
Intro to Analysis (MATH 3203)3
Applied Statistics I (MATH 3153)3
Math Modeling I (MATH 3163)3
Mathematics Electives33
Fine Arts/Humanities16
Electives212
Total30
 
Senior Year
Abstract Algebra I (MATH 4033)3
Linear Algebra I (MATH 4003)3
Math Modeling II (MATH 4163)3
Mathematics Electives33
Electives220
Total32


Notes:
1See General Education requirements.
2At least 40 of the total hours required for graduation must be 3000-4000 level courses.
33000 - 4000 level math elective. MATH 3033, 4703, and 4772 may not be used to satisfy this requirement. MATH 4993 may not be used without prior approval of the department head.

Department of Parks, Recreation and Hospitality Administration
Dr. Theresa A. Herrick, Head
Williamson Hall, Room 101
Telephone: (501) 968-0378
Email: Theresa.Herrick@mail.atu.edu
Associate Professor: T. Herrick
Assistant Professors: Geddie, Lollar, Montgomery, Paassen

The Department of Parks, Recreation and Hospitality Administration offers majors in Recreation and Park Administration and Hospitality Administration. The Recreation and Park Administration major provides specialized education that helps prepare students for supervisory and administrative positions in federal, state, and local recreation and park agencies as well as commercial recreation and tourism organizations. The Hospitality Administration major provides a specialized education that helps prepare students for management positions in hotels, restaurants, and other hospitality organizations.


Recreation and Park Administration

This program is designed to prepare students for management careers in private and public recreation agencies or park systems. A broad background in the behavioral and natural sciences is required with major emphasis on resource management and the delivery of leisure services to diverse populations. Specialized course work in biological sciences and business management aid in natural resource decision making. This provides a base for professional courses in planning, design, and operation of park and recreation facilities. A career in recreation administration, park administration, therapeutic recreation, turf management or interpretation requires a basic understanding of human behavior and the challenges of contemporary society. Due to the multidisciplinary nature of the career field, a student is required to choose courses from several related fields, based on professional interest. A comprehensive general education is complemented with a core of professional courses. The Bachelor of Science in Recreation and Park Administration offers five emphasis of professional preparation:


Recreation Administration Option

Recreation Administration Option prepares students to work in community and agency settings and commercial recreation businesses. Programming and people management are major areas of expertise.

Recreation Administration Emphasis
Freshman YearHours
English Composition I, II (ENGL 1013, 1023)16
Mathematics13
Sciences18
Computer Science (COMS 1003 or 2003)3
Orientation to Parks, Recreation, and Hospitality Administration (RP 1001)1
Principles of Recreation and Parks (RP 1013)3
Social Sciences (PSY 2003 and ECON 2003)6
Physical Education/Recreation Activity11
Total31
 
Sophomore Year
Social Sciences16
Public Speaking (SPH 2003)3
Introduction to Library Resources (LBMD 2001)1
First Aid (PE 2513)3
Recreation Programming (RP 2003)3
Landscape Materials and Construction (RP 2013)3
Physical Education/Recreation Activity11
Support Area Electives310
Total30
 
Junior Year
Fine Arts/Humanities16
Developmental Psychology (PSY 3063)3
Recreation for Special Populations (RP 3013)3
Site Planning and Design (RP 3034)4
Work Experience I (RP 3043)3
Outdoor Education (RP 3063)3
Commercial Recreation (RP 3033)3
Support Area Electives37
Total32
 
Senior Year
Internship Preparation (RP/HA 4001)1
Recreation and Park Administration (RP 4013)3
Research Methods (RP 4023)3
Recreation Law and Policy (RP 4103)3
Personnel Management in Parks, Recreation, and Hospitality Administration (RP 4113)3
Internship (RP 4116)6
Hospitality Marketing and Sales (HA 4013)3
Departmental Electives26
Support Area Electives33
Total31


Notes:
1See General Education requirements.
2See Departmental Electives.
3See Departmental Advisor.

Therapeutic Recreation Emphasis

Therapeutic Recreation Emphasis prepares students who wish to prepare for a career as a Certified Therapeutic Recreation Specialist (CTRS) working with special populations in clinical and community recreation environments. The specialized TR emphasis prepares students for national certification under guidelines established by the National Council for Therapeutic Recreation Certification.

Therapeutic Recreation Emphasis
Freshman YearHours
English Composition I, II (ENGL 1013, 1023)16
Mathematics13
Science (BIOL 2014)8
Computer Science (COMS 1003 or 2003)3
Orientation to Parks, Recreation, and Hospitality Administration (RP 1001)1
Principles of Recreation and Parks (RP 1013)3
Social Sciences (PSY 2003 and ECON 2003)6
Physical Education/Recreation Activity12
Total32
 
Sophomore Year
Social Sciences16
Fine Arts/Humanities16
Public Speaking (SPH 2003)3
Introduction to Library Resources (LBMD 2001)1
First Aid (PE 2513)3
Recreation Programming (RP 2003)3
Introduction to Rehabilitation Services (RS 2003)3
Recreation for Special Populations (RP 3013)3
Medical Terminology (AHS 2013)3
Total31
 
Junior Year
Developmental Psychology (PSY 3063)3
Outdoor Education (RP 3063)3
Human Development (EDFD 3023)3
Camp Counseling and Administration (RP 3023)3
Site Planning and Design (RP 3034)4
Abnormal Psychology (PSY 3003)3
Principles and Techniques of Therapeutic Recreation (RP 4073)3
Work Experience I (RP 3043)3
Commercial Recreation (RP 3033)3
Approved Electives (Human Services)32
Total30
 
Senior Year
Internship Preparation (RP/HA 4001)1
Recreation and Park Administration (RP 4013)3
Research Methods (RP 4023)3
Administration and Operation of Therapeutic Recreation Programs (RP 4273)3
Recreation Law and Policy (RP 4103)3
Personnel Management in Parks, Recreation, and Hospitality Administration (RP 4113)3
Therapeutic Recreation Assessment and Documentation (RP 4173)3
Interventions in Therapeutic Recreation (RP4373)3
Principles and Methods of Adapted Physical Education (PE 4103)3
Internship (RP 4116)26
Total31


Notes:
1See General Education requirements.
2Must have RP 4073 and RP 4273 prior to RP 4116.
3See Departmental Advisor for list of approved courses.

Park Administration Emphasis

Park Administration Emphasis prepares students to manage large parks, resource areas and visitor facilities. Planning and management aspects of land and water resources are taught, with private and public recreation and park systems as targeted work careers.

Park Administration Emphasis
Freshman YearHours
English Composition I, II (ENGL 1013, 1023)16
Mathematics13
Sciences (CHEM 1114 or GEOL 1014 and BIOL 1124 or 1134)8
Computer Science (COMS 1003 or 2003)3
Social Sciences (PSY 2003 and ECON 2003)6
Orientation to Parks, Recreation, and Hospitality Administration (RP 1001)1
Principles of Recreation and Parks (RP 1013)3
Total30
 
Sophomore Year
Social Sciences16
Public Speaking (SPH 2003)3
Recreation Programming (RP 2003)3
First Aid (PE 2513)3
Physical Education/Recreation Activity12
Introduction to Library Resources (LBMD 2001)1
Landscape Materials and Construction (RP 2013)3
Fine Arts/Humanities13
Departmental Electives23
Resource Support Area33
Total30
 
Junior Year
Fine Arts/Humanities13
Commercial Recreation (RP 3033)3
Work Experience I (RP 3043)3
Outdoor Education (RP 3063)3
Recreation for Special Populations (RP 3013)3
Site Planning and Design (RP 3034)4
Interpretive Methods (RP 3093)3
Natural Resource Management and Planning (RP 3053)3
Resource Support Area37
Total32
 
Senior Year
Internship Preparation (RP/HA 4001)1
Recreation and Park Administration (RP 4013)3
Research Methods (RP 4023)3
Park Operations (RP 4063)3
Personnel Management in Parks, Recreation and Hospitality Administration (RP 4113)3
Recreation Law and Policy (RP 4103)3
Internship (RP 4116)6
Departmental Electives24
Hospitality Marketing and Sales (HA 4013)3
Resource Support Area33
Total32


Notes:
1See General Education requirements.
2See Departmental Electives.
3See Departmental Advisor.

Turf Management Emphasis

Turf Management Emphasis prepares students to meet the expanding market for turfgrass specialists in parks, recreation playfields and golf courses. Specialized study in this emphasis will prepare students for the Arkansas State Plant Board Test for Commercial Applicator Certification.

Turf Management Emphasis
Freshman YearHours
English Composition I, II (ENGL 1013, 1023)16
Mathematics13
Science (CHEM 1114 and BIOL 1134)8
Physical Education/Recreation Activity12
Orientation to Parks, Recreation, and Hospitality Administration (RP 1001)1
Principles of Recreation and Parks (RP 1013)3
Computer Science (COMS 1003 or 2003)3
General Horticulture (AGPS 1023)3
Introduction to Library Resources (LBMD 2001)1
Total30
 
Sophomore Year
Social Sciences16
Social Sciences (PSY 2003 and ECON 2003)6
Fine Arts/Humanities16
Landscape Materials and Construction (RP 2013)3
Recreation Programming (RP 2003)3
Public Speaking (SPH 2003)3
Environmental Chemistry (CHEM 2143)3
Total30
 
Junior Year
Recreation for Special Populations (RP 3013)3
Commercial Recreation (RP 3033)3
Site Planning and Design (RP 3034)4
Work Experience I (RP 3043)3
Natural Resource Management & Planning (RP 3053)3
Outdoor Education (RP 3063)3
Soils (AGSS 2013)3
Sports Facilities Planning & Design (RP 3773)3
Recreation and Park Administration (RP 4013)3
Turf Management - Basic Chemical Usage (RP 3783)3
Approved Electives2
Total33
 
Senior Year
Internship Preparation (RP/HA 4001)1
Research Methods (RP 4023)3
Park Operations (RP 4063)3
Recreation Law and Policy (RP 4103)3
Personnel Management in Parks, Recreation and Hospitality Administration (RP 4113)3
Internship (RP 4116)6
Turf Management - Climatic Regions & Cultures (RP 4773)3
Turf Management - Equipment (RP 4783)3
Hospitality Facilities Management (HA 4023)3
Resort Management (RP 4093)3
Total31


Notes:
1See General Education requirements.

Interpretive Naturalist Emphasis

Interpretive Naturalist Emphasis offers a curriculum that utilizes communication skills and interpretive methods courses to provide training for those wanting to find employment with various interpretive and outdoor educational programs of private, state, and federal agencies.

Interpretive Naturalist Emphasis
Freshman YearHours
English Composition I, II (ENGL 1013, 1023)16
Mathematics13
Physical Geology (GEOL 1014) and Principles of Zoology (BIOL 1124)8
Computer Science (COMS 1003 or 2003)3
Social Sciences (PSY 2003 and ECON 2003)6
Orientation to Parks, Recreation and Hospitality Administration (RP 1001)1
Principles of Recreation and Parks (RP 1013)3
Total30
 
Sophomore Year
Social Sciences16
Public Speaking (SPH 2003)3
Recreation Programming (RP 2003)3
First Aid (PE 2513)3
Physical Education/Recreation Activity12
Intro to Library Resources (LBMD 2001)1
Principles of Botany (BIOL 1134)4
Survey of Chemistry (CHEM 1114)4
Principles of Biology (BIOL 1114)4
Total30
 
Junior Year
Fine Arts/Humanities16
Commercial Recreation (RP 3033)3
Work Experience I (RP 3043)3
Outdoor Education (RP 3063)3
Recreation for Special Populations (RP 3013)3
Site Planning and Design (RP 3034)4
Interpretive Methods (RP 3093)3
Principles of Ecology (BIOL 3114)4
Approved Electives (BIOL Elective 3000-4000 level)23
Total32
 
Senior Year
Internship Preparation (RP/HA 4001)1
Recreation and Park Administration (RP 4013)3
Research Methods (RP 4023)3
Recreation & Park Administration Major Elective (RP 3053 or RP 4053)3
Personnel Management in Parks Recreation & Hospitality Admin. (RP 4113)3
Recreation Law and Policy (RP 4103)3
Internship (RP 4116)6
Approved Electives (BIOL Elective 3000 - 4000 level)210
Total32


Notes:
1See appropriate alternatives or substitutions in General Education requirements.
2See departmental advisor.

Hospitality Administration

The hospitality administration degree program is designed to prepare students for management positions within the hospitality industry such as lodging, resorts, conference and convention centers, restaurants, contract services, theme parks and travel/tourism-related operations.

The course work concentrates on general business, management, finance, marketing, accounting, law, computer science, and specific courses related to hospitality management. The entire curriculum features numerous opportunities for the practical application of problem-solving skills and creativity.

Curriculum in Hospitality Administration
(formerly Hotel and Restaurant Management)
Freshman YearHours
English Composition I, II (ENGL 1013, 1023)16
Sciences ( BIOL 1014, CHEM 1114)8
Mathematics13
Orientation in Parks, Recreation, and Hospitality Administration (HA/RP 1001)1
Microcomputer Applications (COMS 2003)3
Introduction to Hospitality Management (HA 1043)3
Sanitation Safety (HA 1013)3
Physical Education/Recreation Activity12
Electives22
Total31
 
Sophomore Year
Basic Nutrition in Hospitality Administration (HA 2813)3
Lodging Operations (HA 2043)3
Principles of Food Preparation (HA 2913)3
Accounting Principles (ACCT 2003, 2013)6
Legal Environment of Business (BUAD 2033)3
Business Statistics (BUAD 2053)3
Public Speaking (SPH 2003)3
Social Sciences (ECON 2003 and PSY 2003)6
Electives22
Total32
 
Junior Year
Menu Analysis and Purchasing (HA 4043)3
Hospitality Financial Analysis (HA 3073)3
Management and Organizational Behavior (MGMT 3003)3
Dining Service Management (HA 3063)3
Business Communications (BUAD 3023)3
Social Sciences16
Humanities13
Fine Arts13
Electives23
Total30
 
Senior Year
Internship Preparation (RP/HA 4001)1
Quantity Food Production (HA 4074)4
Hospitality Marketing and Sales (HA 4013)3
Legal Aspects of Hospitality Administration (HA 4033)3
Hospitality Facilities Management and Design (HA 4023)3
Meetings and Conventions Management (HA 4053)3
Personnel Management in Parks, Recreation, and Hospitality Administration (HA/RP 4113)3
Resort Management (HA/RP 4093)3
Internship (HA/RP 4116)6
Electives22
Total31


Notes:
1See General Education requirements.
2See Departmental Advisor

Kingston College - In addition to the program offered on the Russellville campus, Arkansas Tech University offers courses leading to a baccalaureate degree in hospitality administration through Kingston College in Vancouver, British Columbia. The program is designed so that freshman and sophomore-level courses are provided by Kingston College, and the junior and senior-level courses leading to the four-year degree are provided by Arkansas Tech University.

Curriculum in Hospitality Administration
(Kingston Campus)
Freshman YearHours
Communications (ENGL 150, 160)16
Mathematics (MATH 100)13
Sciences ( BIOL 110, 120, CHEM 110, 120)18
Physical Education/Recreation Activity (PE 100)12
Introduction to Hospitality Management (HTMD 100)3
Computer Science (CPSC 110)3
Sanitation Safety (HTMD 244)3
Electives22
Total30
 
Sophomore Year
Basic Nutrition in Hospitality Administration (HA 2813)3
Social Sciences (PSY 110 and ECON 120)6
Lodging Operations (HTMD 332)3
Principles of Food Preparation (HTMD 345)3
Accounting Principles (ACCT 110, 120)6
Public Speaking (PSP 110)3
Business Statistics (MATH 230)3
Legal Environment of Business (BUSI 210)3
Electives23
Total33
 
Junior Year
Menu Analysis and Purchasing (HA 4043)3
Hospitality Financial Analysis (HA 3073)3
Management and Organizational Behavior (BUSI 320)3
Business Communications (BUSI 150)3
Dining Service Management (HA 3063)3
Social Sciences16
Humanities13
Fine Arts13
Electives23
Total30
 
Senior Year
Quantity Food Production (HA 4074)4
Legal Aspects of Hospitality Administration (HA 4033)3
Hospitality Marketing and Sales (HA 4013)3
Hospitality Facilities Management and Design (HA 4023)3
Meetings and Conventions Management (HA 4053)3
Personnel Management in Parks, Recreation, and Hospitality Administration (HA/RP 4113)3
Resort Management (HA/RP 4093)3
Internship Preparation (HA/RP 4001)1
Internship (HA/RP 4116)6
Electives22
Total31


Notes:
1See General Education requirements.
2See Departmental Electives.

Arkansas Center for Energy, Natural Resources, and Environmental Studies
Murray Clark, Director
Stephen W. Kline, Research Scientist, Mineralist-Petrologist
Energy Building
Telephone: (501) 968-0201

The Center, with the cooperation of various components of Arkansas Tech University, other state agencies and institutions, and professional staff, has the responsibility of planning and conducting competent research, investigations, demonstrations, and experiments of either a basic or applied nature, or both, in relation to energy, natural resources and the environment.

Additional information may be obtained by writing or calling the Arkansas Center for Energy, Natural Resources and Environmental Studies, telephone 968-0201.

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