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Contents
Biological Sciences
Nursing
Physical Sciences
Pre-Professional
Index



School of Physical and Life Sciences


The School of Physical and Life Sciences is subdivided into three administrative units: the Departments of Biological Science, Physical Science, and Nursing. These departments offer a variety of major programs leading to baccalaureate and associate degrees. The school also serves a special role in providing the principal curricular needs of students seeking to enter professional schools of medicine, dentistry, medical technology, optometry, pharmacy, chiropractic, and others. A secondary service is that of contributing to the general education of those students majoring outside of the School of Physical and Life Sciences.


Dr. Richard R. Cohoon, Dean
McEver Hall, Room 45
Telephone: (501) 968-0498
Email: Richard.Cohoon@mail.atu.edu
Fax: (501) 964-0837

Students earning degrees in the School of Physical and Life Sciences are in a particularly enviable position. Their undergraduate education makes them eligible to compete for immediate employment in a variety of professional positions or for entry into graduate school.

The School of Physical and Life Sciences offers programs of study leading to baccalaureate and associate degrees as listed below:

  1. Bachelor of Science
    1. Biology, also with an Environmental option
    2. Chemistry with A.C.S. Approved, Environmental, and General options
    3. Engineering Physics
    4. Fisheries and Wildlife Biology
    5. Geology with Professional and Environmental options
    6. Health Information Management
    7. Medical Technology
    8. Natural Science
    9. Physical Science with General, Physics, and Nuclear Physics options
    10. Bachelor of Science in Nursing
    11. Nursing
  2. Associate of Science
    1. Medical Assistant

Environmental Science Three environmental science degree options are available as follows: B.S. in biology-environmental science option, B.S. in chemistry-environmental science option, and B.S. in geology-environmental science option. The student interested in environmental science should choose the program that best suits his or her interest based on background, competencies, and career objectives.

Arkansas Tech University's location in the Arkansas River Valley between the Ouachita and Ozark mountains is ideally suited to environmental programs. With the diversity of ecosystems and geological formations found, the area serves as an outdoor laboratory encompassing habitats that range from wetland and riparian ecosystems to upland coniferous and mountaintop deciduous forests. Swamps, streams, rivers, and lakes dot the landscape. Geological formations ranging in age from Ordovician to Pennsylvanian are within easy field trip distance from the University. Crop farming, hog and poultry production, a nuclear-powered electricity generating plant, coal strip mining, urban centers, and a multi-use national forest provide ample opportunities for studying the impact of modern society on ecosystems and the natural environment.

The employment opportunities in environmental science are good and projected to continue to increase. Graduates may find employment with environmental consulting companies, local, state, or federal governmental agencies, and private companies that have significant environmental impact. Environmental scientists are involved in the following types of studies: environmental impact analysis, pollution assessment and control, solid waste landfill location and management, ecosystem analysis, surface and groundwater resources, and air quality, and many others.

The student interested in a specific environmental science curriculum should refer to the appropriate section of this book. For example, the B.S. in biology-environmental science option is listed with the other biology curricula.

Allied Health Science Programs The allied health science programs are composed of a two-year curriculum in medical assistant and four-year curricula in health information management and medical technology. Additionally there is a certificate program in medical transcription. Statements and curricula for these programs are listed below.


Biology
Natural Science
Fisheries and Wildlife Biology
Health Information Management
Medical Assistant
Medical Technology
Medical Transcription


Department of Biological Sciences
Dr. Charles J. Gagen, Head
McEver Hall, Room 34D
Telephone: (501) 968-0294
Email: Charlie.Gagen@mail.atu.edu
Professors: Hutchinson, Kirkconnell, Palko, Pendergrass
Associate Professors: Gagen, Johnson, Kellner, Stoeckel, Stoltzfus, Wilkins
Assistant Professors: Murray, Nupp, Sparacino, Yamashita
Instructors: Chaney, Merle

The Department of Biological Sciences offers bachelor of science degree curricula in biology also with an environmental option, fisheries and wildlife biology, natural science, health information management, and medical technology. In addition, an associate degree program in medical assistant and a certificate program in medical transcription are offered.

Students interested in training to teach at the secondary level should follow the suggested curriculum of either biology or natural science as outlined under the teacher certification curricula, School of Education.

Each of the bachelor of science degree programs offered by the department, with the exception of medical technology and teacher certification curricula, requires a total of 124 hours for graduation. The medical technology program requires a total of 135 hours for completion. It should be noted that neither BIOL 1003, 1001, 1014 nor PHSC 1013, 1021 may be counted as major courses toward completion of any bachelor of science degree program within the department, except the health information management program.

Except for Allied Health Science programs (AHS), which are governed by certifying associations, no more than 12 hours of "D's" may be applied toward the degree. Students in the Department of Biological Sciences, except for AHS majors, are required to take a common core consisting of:

  1. BIOL 1114 Principles of Biology
  2. BIOL 1124 Principles of Zoology
  3. BIOL 1134 Botany
  4. BIOL 3034 Genetics
  5. BIOL (FW) 3114 Ecology
  6. BIOL 3124 General Physiology or BIOL 3074 Human Physiology
  7. BIOL 4891 Seminar in Biology

These same students are required to take MATH 1113 College Algebra, plus two additional math courses above that level. Students should see specific degree programs for math requirements. A computer science (COMS) elective is also required.

Graduating seniors, except those in AHS programs, will be required to take the Major Field Assessment Test (MFAT) in Biology as part of the assessment plan for the department. Students will take the test during the semester of planned graduation. The test will be administered during assessment week.


Biology

The baccalaureate degree program in biology is designed to prepare students for a wide range of career opportunities. It also provides a solid foundation for those wanting to pursue specialization at the graduate level. Pre-professional courses have been arranged to meet the requirements of students wishing to study medicine, dentistry, pharmacy, and related fields of specialization.

Majors in biology must complete 40 semester hours in biology. Specific course requirements are outlined in the curriculum in biology.

Arkansas Tech University is affiliated with the Gulf Coast Research Laboratory (GCRL) at Ocean Springs, Mississippi. With prior departmental approval, Arkansas Tech University students may enroll in marine biology courses at GCRL, with the credits applied toward the biology degree at Arkansas Tech. This affiliation makes possible a concentration in marine biology.



Curriculum in Biology
Freshman YearHours
English Composition I, II (ENGL 1013, 1023)16
College Algebra (MATH 1113)13
Social Sciences16
Principles of Biology (BIOL 1114)4
Principles of Zoology (BIOL 1124)4
Principles of Botany (BIOL 1134)4
Physical Education12
Total29
 
Sophomore Year
Social Sciences16
General Chemistry I, II (CHEM 2124, 2134)8
Genetics (BIOL 3034)4
Mathematics26
Biology Elective34
Computer Science Elective3
Total31
 
Junior Year
Physical Principles I, II (PHYS 2014, 2024)8
Organic Chemistry (CHEM 3254, 3264)8
Biology Elective (3000-4000 level)4
General Physiology (BIOL 3124) or Human Physiology (BIOL 3074)4
Principles of Ecology (BIOL 3114)4
Electives4
Total32
 
Senior Year
Seminar (BIOL 4891)1
Fine Arts/Humanities16
Biology Electives47
Electives418
Total32

Notes:
1See appropriate alternatives or substitutions in General Education requirements.
2Six hours of mathematics above MATH 1113.
3Students interested in concentrating in molecular biology should take courses in biochemistry, microbiology, and immunology or cell biology. Students interested in concentrating in field biology should take courses in dendrology, entomology, herpetology, ichthyology, invertebrate zoology, limnology, mammalogy, ornithology, plant taxonomy, and parasitology.
4Sufficient courses at 3000-4000 level to constitute 40 hours.

Biology Environmental Option

The baccalaureate degree program in biological science includes an environmental option. This program offers a curriculum with the necessary courses in biology, chemistry, and economics to provide an educational foundation for students interested in pursuing employment or graduate studies in the environmental sciences.

Curriculum in Biology
(Environmental Option)
Freshman YearHours
English Composition I, II (ENGL 1013, 1023)116
College Algebra (MATH 1113)3
Introductory Sociology (SOC 1003)13
Principles of Environmental Science (BIOL 1004)4
Principles of Biology (BIOL 1114)4
General Chemistry I, II (CHEM 2124, 2134)8
Physical Education12
Total30
 
Sophomore Year
Environmental Chemistry (CHEM 2143)3
Principles of Economics (ECON 2003)13
American Government (POLS 2003)13
Principles of Zoology (BIOL 1124)4
Principles of Botany (BIOL 1134)4
Computer Science (COMS 2003)3
Statistics (PSY 2053 or MATH 2163)3
Physical Principles I,II (PHYS 2014, 2024)8
Environmental Seminar (BIOL/CHEM/GEOL 2111)1
Total32
 
Junior Year
Organic Chemistry (CHEM 3254, 3264)8
Calculus23-4
Social Sciences13
Fine Arts/Humanities13
General Physiology (BIOL 3124)4
Principles of Ecology (BIOL 3114)4
Technical Communication (ENGL 2053)3
Environmental Seminar (BIOL/CHEM/GEOL 3111)1
Total29-30
 
Senior Year
Genetics (BIOL 3034)4
Conservation (BIOL 3043)3
Microbiology (BIOL 3054)4
Limnology (BIOL 4024)4
Fine Arts/Humanties13
Fundamentals of Toxicology (CHEM 3353)3
Environmental Seminar (BIOL/CHEM/GEOL 4111)1
Biology Elective (3000-4000 level)4
Electives36-7
Total32-33


Notes:
1See appropriate alternatives or substitutions in General Education requirements.
2MATH 2914 is recommended if you are considering graduate school in this field. Furthermore, MATH 2924 should be considered for a general elective. Otherwise, MATH 2243 is recommended.
3Recommended electives include: AGSS 2014, FW 3024, FW 4034,GEOL 1014 and 3153, POLS 2013 and 4103, or SPH 2003 (but also note footnote 2, relative to calculus).

Natural Science

The baccalaureate degree program in natural science allows the student to combine a concentration in the biological sciences with one in physical sciences. The curriculum affords considerable flexibility, and by careful selection of electives and required courses in the major it may be used to prepare for a wide range of career options. The curriculum can be adapted for use by those anticipating graduate studies in the life sciences and those pursuing medical and para-medical programs.

In this curriculum the student must complete a minimum of 55 hours of science and mathematics, in addition to MATH 1113, to complete degree requirements. NOTE: Students who anticipate graduate school should consider taking PHYS 2014, 2024.

Curriculum in Nature Science
Freshman YearHours
English Composition I, II (ENGL 1013, 1023)16
World Civilization I, II (HIST 1503, 1513)16
College Algebra (MATH 1113)3
Principles of Biology (BIOL 1114)4
Principles of Zoology (BIOL 1124)4
Principles of Botany (BIOL 1134)4
Physical Education12
Total29
 
Sophomore Year
Social Sciences16
General Chemistry I, II (CHEM 2124, 2134)8
Statistics23
Computer Science33
Genetics (BIOL 3034)4
Public Speaking (SPH 2003)3
Mathematics43
Electives3
Total33
 
Junior Year
Fine Arts/Humanities16
Biology Elective (3000-4000 level)4
Physics54
General Physiology (BIOL 3124)4
Principles of Ecology (BIOL 3114)4
Biology Elective4
Electives (3000-4000 level)6
Total32
 
Senior Year
Seminar (BIOL 4891)1
Biology Electives (3000-4000 level)7
Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry (CHEM 3254)4
Electives618
Total30


Notes:
1See appropriate alternatives or substitutions in General Education requirements.
2MATH 2163 or 3163 or PSY 2053.
3COMS 1003, 1103, 1203, or 2103.
4MATH 1203, 1913, or 2913.
5Physical Principles 2014 or 2024 or Applied Physics 1114.
6Sufficient courses at 3000-4000 level to constitute 40 hours.

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology
Dr. Joseph N. Stoeckel, Director
McEver Hall, Room 31
Telephone: (501) 964-0852

The fisheries and wildlife biology program is a professional program designed to prepare qualified field and research biologists, as well as to provide a sound foundation for those students who intend to pursue graduate studies in wildlife biology, fisheries biology or field ecology. Through selection of appropriate elective courses, graduates are eligible for certification by the Wildlife Society or the American Fisheries Society.

Field biologists are employed by various state and federal agencies concerned with natural resources management including the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, U.S. Forest Service, Arkansas Department of Pollution Control and Ecology, National Park Service, and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.

Employment opportunities in the private sector are also available. Timber, mining, and utility companies hire field biologists for advice and management of industrial lands. Environmental consulting firms, commercial fish and game farms, and nature centers require qualified researchers, technicians, and educators. Arkansas is known for its abundant natural resources and outdoor recreation. The need for professionally trained field biologists and natural resource managers is expected to expand.

Majors in fisheries and wildlife biology must complete a minimum of 124 semester hours as specified in the following curriculum outline. No more than 12 hours of "D's" may be applied toward the degree. Candidates for graduation are expected to complete a comprehensive series of practical and technical exams to assess mastery of program objectives.

Curriculum in Fisheries and Wildlife Biology
Freshman YearHours
Orientation to Fisheries and Wildlife Science (FW 1001)1
English Composition I, II (ENGL 1013, 1023)16
Principles of Biology (BIOL 1114)4
Principles of Zoology (BIOL 1124)4
Social Sciences16
General Chemistry I (CHEM 2124)4
College Algebra (MATH 1113)3
Physical Education12
Total30
 
Sophomore Year
Principles of Botany (BIOL 1134)4
Applied Physics (PHYS 1114 or alternate)4
Technical Communication (ENGL 2053)3
Computer Science Elective3
Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry (CHEM 3254)4
Ichthyology (FW 3084) or Mammalogy (FW 3154) or Ornithology (FW 3144)4
Principles of Ecology (FW 3114)4
Social Sciences13
Statistics (PSY 2053 or MATH 2163)3
Total32
 
Junior Year
Junior Seminar in Fisheries and Wildlife Biology (FW 3001)1
Social Sciences13
Fine Arts/Humanities13
Calculus for Business and Economics (MATH 2243 or alternate)3
Principles of Wildlife Management (FW 4003)3
Limnology (FW 4024) or Forest Ecology (FW 3024)4
General Physiology (BIOL 3124)4
Plant Taxonomy (BIOL 3004) or Dendrology (BIOL 4044)4
Public Speaking (SPH 2003)3
Electives2,3,43
Total31
 
Senior Year
Fine Arts/Humanities13
Genetics (BIOL 3034)4
Fish and Wildlife Administration (FW 4053)3
Principles of Fisheries Management (FW 4083)3
Senior Seminar in Fisheries and Wildlife Biology (FW 4001)1
Wildlife Techniques (FW 4013) or Fisheries Techniques (FW 4043)3
FW Electives (3000-4000 level)3,48
Electives6
Total31


Notes:
1See appropriate alternatives or substitutions in General Education requirements.
2The Wildlife Society requires a total of 6 hours of administration and planning courses. See advisor.
3Qualification as a federal wildlife biologist requires a total of 9 hours of botany.
4American Fisheries Society requires a total of four courses in fisheries and aquatic science, 15 hours of physical science, and 6 hours of human dimensions. See advisor.

Health Information Management
Health Information Management
Melinda Wilkins, Director
Wilson Hall, Room 105
Telephone: (501) 968-0690

The degree program in health information management prepares the student for a professional career as an active member of the modern health-care team. In this age of increased computerization and data analysis the health information management field is an exciting new area with virtually unlimited possibilities. The health information management administrator is an expert in the world of health record systems. He/she is responsible for obtaining complete health records for use in research; for gathering statistical information on which to base long-range health planning goals; for determining the legitimacy of requests for confidential medical information; for controlling the circulation and integrity of health records; and, as department head, is responsible for efficiency of the health information department employees in the performance of daily activities.

The health information department in a medical facility has in its care all the documentation regarding patient-care, physician as well as ancillary information. Responsibility for data validity and integrity play a major role in the health information profession. He/she must be progressive, conscientious, tactful, and knowledgeable, as much work is accomplished in cooperation with other allied health professionals. Above all, the health information professional must adhere to the Code of Ethics of the American Health Information Management Association and to the appropriate institutional behavioral codes that apply.

Directed practice is scheduled at affiliated hospitals in nearby cities for a period of six hours per week during the fall and spring semesters. The management affiliation may be assigned to a hospital in a distant city for four weeks (40 hours per week) and normally occurs in the summer immediately following the senior year. Students are responsible for all transportation and lodging expenses during these assignments; however, every effort will be made to minimize such costs.

Students must make at least a "C" in each of the professional courses and demonstrate their proficiency in directed practice and management-affiliation. Upon successful completion of the program, the student is granted a Bachelor of Science degree in health information management and becomes eligible to write the national certification examination. The student already holding a baccalaureate degree may apply for the HIM program as specified in the Application Guidelines and work toward another baccalaureate degree provided the pre-professional course of study as stated has been successfully completed, and thus establish eligibility to write the national certification examination. Accredited record technicians are urged to contact the Program Director for information regarding RHIA progression. The national certification examination is given once each year by the American Health Information Management Association.

The application process for the Health Information Management Program is as follows:

  1. Application for upper level professional HIM courses must be on file with the HIM Program Director by March 15th prior to the year you wish to take HIM courses.
  2. To be eligible for application interview, the following must be on file:
    1. Application
    2. Current copy of all applicable transcripts, including current GPA of 2.5 on a 4.0 scale
    3. COMPASS/ACT scores
  3. Applicants will be required to complete an interview with an interview team. Consideration will be given to areas such as:
    1. Dedication and Perseverance
    2. Aptitude
    3. Knowledge of HIM Profession
    4. Professional appearance
    5. Flexibility
    6. Realistic career goals
    7. True desire to enter HIM profession
    8. Ability to finish HIM program within prescribed time
  4. Candidates will be ranked based on interview score, GPA, and number of prerequisite courses completed. The top twenty will be selected. A ranked order waiting list will be maintained by the HIM Program Director.
  5. Candidates will be notified prior to pre-registration for the fall semester. If accepted, candidates must return a signed statement acknowledging acceptance. Candidates must register for courses indicated on the degree plan. Any change in degree plan requires approval of the student's HIM faculty advisor. Candidates must notify program director of change in degree choice.
  6. A late application deadline of August 15th will be observed if positions are available. Late applicants will be notified as soon as possible or during the week of late registration.
  7. If a candidate fails a course that would preclude graduation, or does not earn at least a "C" in HIM courses, reapplication to the HIM Program will be required.

The Health Information Management Program is accredited by the Commission on the Accreditation of Allied Health Educational Programs (CAAHEP) in cooperation with the American Health Information Management Association's Council on Accreditation.

Curriculum in Health Information Management
Freshman YearHours
English Composition I, II (ENGL 1013, 1023)16
Algebra for General Education (MATH 1103)13
Electives (HIM 1002, Health Information Management Orientation, suggested)2
Introduction to Computer Based Systems (COMS 1003)3
Public Speaking (SPH 2003)3
Introduction to Biological Science (BIOL 1014)4
Social Sciences16
Basic Pharmocology with an Overview of Microbiology (AHS 1024)4
Total31
 
Sophomore Year
Social Sciences16
Physical Education12
Human Anatomy and Physiology (BIOL 2004)4
Medical Terminology (AHS 2013)3
Survey of Chemistry (CHEM 1114)14
Microcomputer Applications (COMS 2003)3
Accounting Principles I (ACCT 2003)3
Electives2
Total27
 
Junior Year
Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences (PSY 2053)3
Fine Arts/Humanities16
Introduction to Health Information Management (HIM 3024)4
Personnel/Human Resource Management (MGMT 4023)3
Principles of Disease (HIM 4153)3
Management and Organizational Behavior (MGMT 3003)3
Alternative Health Records (HIM 3133)3
Health Data and Statistics (HIM 3132)2
Electives (HIM 3142, Healthcare Registries, suggested)2
Total29
 
Senior Year
Directed Practice I, II (HIM 4182, 4292)4
Organization and Administration in HIM (HIM 4063)3
Basic Coding Principles (HIM 3033)3
Advanced Concepts in HIM (HIM 3043)3
Research in Health Information Management (HIM 4092)2
Advanced Coding Principles (HIM 4033)3
Computer Applications in Accounting and Business (COMS 3803)3
Legal Concepts of the Health Field (HIM 4073)3
Health Organization Trends (HIM 4083)3
Systems Analysis for HIM (HIM 4983)3
Total30
 
Summer Session (Following Senior Year)
Affiliation (HIM 4895)5
Seminar in Health Information Management (HIM 4892)2
Total7


Notes:
1See appropriate alternatives or substitutions in General Education requirements.

Medical Assistant
Medical Assistant
Tom Palko, Director
Wilson Hall, Room 228
Telephone: (501) 968-0328

Medical assistants serve with medical doctors in their offices or other medical settings, performing administrative and/or clinical duties. The medical assistant curriculum is a two-year associate of science degree program. This program offers the student a broad foundation in basic medical assisting skills, including a period of practical experience in a medical facility working under the supervision of clinic personnel and the Medical Assistant Program Director.

Basic medical assistant training and education consist of learning experiences in science, communication skills, medical records and medical transcription; medical laboratory and examination room procedures; and general office practices.

Admission to the second year of the program is on a competitive basis and is limited to twenty students each year. A student is eligible for admission to the second year of study upon: completion of all prerequisites with an overall grade point average of at least a 2.00 on a 4.00 scale; demonstration of typing proficiency or completion of a keyboarding class with a grade of "C" or better; presentation of evidence of good health; and satisfactory completion of a personal interview with the program director. If more than twenty students qualify for the second year of the program, they will be ranked by cumulative grade point average. Those not admitted in the first round of selection will be placed on a ranked waiting list. As vacancies develop, they will be filled from the waiting list.

Students enrolled in AHS 2034, AHS 2044, and AHS 2055 are required to carry malpractice liability insurance. A group insurance policy is arranged by the program director, but the premiums are paid by the student and are not included in the tuition and fees paid to the University.

The Medical Assistant Program is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP), on recommendation of the Committee on Accreditation for Medical Assistant Education. Students who successfully complete the associate degree program for medical assistant will be eligible to sit for the Certified Medical Assistant (CMA) examination.

Curriculum in Medical Assistant
Freshman YearHours
English Composition I, II (ENGL 1013, 1023)16
Principles of Zoology (BIOL 1124) or Principles of Biology (BIOL 1114)4
Basic Pharmacology with an Overview of Microbiology (AHS 1024)4
Mathematics13
General Psychology (PSY 2003)3
Speech (SPH 1003 or 2003)3
Principles of Word Processing (BUAD 2043)3
Introduction to Computer Based Systems (COMS 1003)3
First Aid (PE 2513)3
Total32
 
Sophomore Year
Basic Human Anatomy and Physiology (BIOL 2004)4
Medical Terminology (AHS 2013)33
Medical Laboratory Orientation and Instrumentation (AHS 2023)3
Medical Laboratory Orientation and Instrumentation, Laboratory (AHS 2022)2
Medical Assistant Clinical Practice (AHS 2034)4
Medical Assistant Clinical Practice, Laboratory (AHS 2031)1
Professional Medical Transcription (HIM 2003)3
Medical Assistant Administrative Practice (AHS 2044)4
Legal Concepts for the Health Fields (HIM 4073)3
Computers in the Medical Office with an Overview of Insurance Procedures (AHS 2053)3
American History23
Total33
 
Summer Session (Following Sophomore Year)
Externship (AHS 2055)5
Medical Assistant Seminar (AHS 2061)1
Total6


Notes:
1See appropriate alternatives or substitutions in General Education requirements.
2HIST 2003, 2013, 3013, 3023, 3033, 3043, or 3053.
3Credit may be earned through successful completion of the challenge examination in medical terminology. Refer to the section in this catalog entitled "Credit by Examination."

Medical Technology
Tom Palko, M.T., ASCP, Director
Wilson Hall, Room 228
Telephone: (501) 968-0328

Arkansas Tech University, in affiliation with approved schools of medical technology, offers a four-year program leading to the bachelor of science degree and to certification as a medical technologist. The affiliated schools of medical technology are accredited by the Council on Medical Education and Hospitals of the American Medical Association.

The first three years of the curriculum are taught on the Tech campus and the fourth (professional) year is taught at one of the affiliated schools of medical technology. Admission to the professional year is on a competitive basis and students must meet the admission standards of the medical technology school.

Personnel with Medical Technology
Affiliated Institutions

  1. Baptist Medical System, Little Rock, Arkansas:
    1. John E. Slaven, M.D., Medical Director, School of Medical Technology;
    2. Sandra G. Ackerman, B.S., M.T (ASCP)S.H., Program Director, School of Medical Technology
  2. St. John's Regional Medical Center, Joplin, Missouri:
    1. Michael Thompson, M.D., Medical Director: B.S., University of Nebraska, 1980; M.D., Creighton School of Medicine, 1997; Medical Director of School of Medical Technology, 1998
    2. Debbie Lorimer, M.A., M.T. (ASCP), Program Director: B.S., Pittsburg State University, 1974; Medical Technology Internship, Jane Phillips Episcopal Memorial Hospital, 1974; Masters in Laboratory Management, Central Michigan University, 1982; Program Director of School of Medical Technology, 1994

To qualify for the bachelor of science degree the student must satisfactorily complete a minimum of 90 semester hours during the first three years of the program and 40 semester hours during the final professional year (52 weeks of class) at an affiliated medical technology school. The third year of the curriculum (30 semester hours) must include 20 semester hours in courses numbered 3000 or above, of which 4 semester hours must be in chemistry and 7 or 8 semester hours in biology. Also, the third year of the curriculum must be completed in residence at Arkansas Tech University.

Tuition and fees for courses taken the senior year at one of the affiliated medical technology schools will be assessed at the current rate charged by the affiliated school and are payable to Arkansas Tech University. Financial aid and scholarship arrangements are also made by Tech.

Upon successful completion of the final 40 hours at an affiliated medical technology school, a student is eligible for a bachelor of science degree, as well as being eligible to write the National Board Examination for licensure. This examination is given at various times throughout the year by the Board of Registry of the American Society of Clinical Pathologists.

Curriculum in Medical Technology
Freshman YearHours
English Composition I, II (ENGL 1013, 1023)26
College Algebra (MATH 1113)3
Plane Trigonometry (MATH 1203)3
Principles of Zoology (BIOL 1124) or Principles of Biology (BIOL 1114)4
General Chemistry I, II (CHEM 2124, 2134)8
Physical Education22
Electives3
Total29
 
Sophomore Year
Social Sciences29
Physical Principles I, II (PHYS 2014, 2024)8
Medical Terminology (AHS 2013)33
Fine Arts/Humanities23
Medical Laboratory Orientation and Instrumentation (BIOL 2023)3
Medical Laboratory Orientation and Instrumentation, Laboratory (BIOL 2022)2
Electives3-4
Total31-32
 
Junior Year
Microbiology (BIOL 3054)4
General Psychology (PSY 2003)3
Fine Arts/Humanities23
Biology (BIOL 2004, 3034, 3064, 3074, 3134, 4023, or 4033)7-8
Chemistry (CHEM 3245, 3254, 3264, 3343, or 4413)12-13
Total29-31
 
Senior Year1
Clinical Microscopy and Body Fluids (MEDT 4012-3)12-3
Hematology (MEDT 4029)19
Immuno-hematology (MEDT 4035)15
Clinical Chemistry and Instrumentation (MEDT 4048-9)18-9
Microbiology (MEDT 4056-7)16-7
Parasitology (MEDT 4064)14
Serology (MEDT 4073)13
Special Topics (MEDT 4081-2)1-2
Total40


Notes:
1All 4000 level MEDT courses are offered at affiliate institutions; enrollment is completed through Arkansas Tech University.
2See appropriate alternatives or substitutions in General Education requirements.
3Credit may be earned through successful completion of the challenge examination in medical terminology. Refer to the section in this catalog entitled "Credit by Examination."

Medical Transcription
Darla Sparacino, Coordinator
Wilson Hall, Room 105
Telephone: (501) 968-0443

An educational program in medical transcription will prepare the student for entry-level employment as a medical transcriptionist, by providing the basic knowledge, understanding, and skills required to transribe medical dictation with accuracy, clarity, and timeliness, applying the principles of professional and ethical conduct.

The certificate program in medical transcription is available to those students completing the two-semester curriculum outlined below. Graduates may be eligible to take the voluntary certification examination offered by the American Association for Medical Transcriptionists (AAMT). The AAMT recommends applicants have a minimum of three years' experience in transcribing acute-care reports prior to taking the examination.

Medical transcription requires knowledge of medical terminology and internal organization of medical reports, as well as operation of modern transcription equipment. Medical transcriptionists may be employed in a variety of health-related settings, including doctors' offices, hospitals, clinics, laboratories, radiology departments, insurance companies, and governmental medical facilities.

The student is encouraged to contact the Medical Transcription Coordinator at the first opportunity for advisement purposes. To be eligible for a certificate in medical transcription, the student must obtain a "C" or better in all courses and must complete at least 14 hours on Tech campus. The student must also have a minimum overall grade point average of 2.0 on a 4.0 scale in those courses taken to satisfy requirements for the medical transcription certificate.

Curriculum in Medical Transcription
Summer TermsHours
Keyboarding I and II (BUAD 1001, BUAD 2002)3
Introduction to Computer Based Systems (COMS 1003)3
Medical Terminology (AHS 2013)3
Total9
 
Fall Semester
Fundamentals of Medical Transcription (HIM 2003)3
Anatomy and Physiology (BIOL 2004)4
Principles of Word Processing (BUAD 2043)3
Principles of Disease (HIM 4153)3
Total13
 
Spring Semester
Advanced Medical Transcription (HIM 3003)3
English Composition (ENGL 1013)3
Total6



Department of Nursing
Rebecca Burris, Head
Dean Hall, Suite 224
Telephone: (501) 968-0383
Email: Rebecca.Burris@mail.atu.edu
Associate Professors: R. Burris, C. Jones, P. Lee
Assistant Professors: Beineman, Buckholtz, K. Cox, J. Fletcher, Helm, Helms, Kennedy, McKown, C. Smith
Learning Resources Coordinator: Bosold

Purpose
Arkansas Tech University's nursing curriculum is designed to prepare students for beginning professional responsibilities in a variety of health-care settings and to provide the necessary foundations for graduate study.

Accreditation
The Bachelor of Science in Nursing program is approved by the Arkansas State Board of Nursing and the Arkansas Department of Higher Education. The program is accredited by the National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission, 61 Broadway, New York, N.Y. 10006, Telephone: 800-669-1656.

Description
The Department of Nursing offers undergraduate study in nursing to qualified high school graduates, graduates of diploma and associate degree programs in nursing, licensed psychiatric technician nurses, and licensed practical nurses. The baccalaureate program leads to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Nursing. Satisfactory completion of two academic years of foundation courses followed by two years of upper-division professional nursing courses is required.

Upon completion of degree requirements, the student may be eligible to take the national examination (NCLEX) for licensure as a registered nurse. All nursing students should be aware that the State Board of Nursing requires all applicants for the NCLEX to have a criminal background check performed. If the applicant has ever been convicted of a crime, the Board will review the application and make a decision as to whether the applicant is eligible to take the NCLEX exam and to practice nursing in the State of Arkansas. Any student who has been convicted of a crime should notify his or her advisor before taking the prerequisite courses. This information will be kept strictly confidential. The student will be advised of the method of petitioning the Board and counseled regarding the process. A registered nurse may be subject to losing his or her license if the conviction is discovered after the license is granted.

The Department of Nursing reserves the right to make changes, without prior notice, in the curriculum and program requirements. Changes are made in keeping with the changing health needs of society and/or the best interests of the students and the department to maintain quality professional nursing education.

The Department of Nursing utilizes the clinical facilities and services of the Arkansas River Valley area; however, in order to completely meet the objectives of certain courses, the student should be prepared to travel out of this area. Students are required to provide their own transportation.

In addition to the on-campus program, courses for the senior year are offered in Fort Smith, Arkansas. Inquiries may be made at (501) 709-1968.

Admission
Admission into lower division foundation courses is open to any Arkansas Tech University student who meets the requirements. Nursing majors are encouraged to seek academic advising from the nursing faculty immediately upon acceptance to the University.

Admission to the upper division nursing courses is competitive and subject to evaluation by the Nursing Department's Admission and Progression Committee. Generic students are considered for admission the spring preceding the fall in which they plan to enter nursing courses. All transcripts and/or credentials along with an Application to Upper Division must be submitted to the Department of Nursing by March 1. Eligible Registered Nurses applying for admission to Level III and repeating students applying for readmission to Level I or II must also submit an application for upper division by March 1. Eligible repeating students applying for readmission to Level II or IV must submit all required materials by October 1. Minimum requirements for acceptance into the upper division nursing courses are:

  1. Prerequisite grade point average of 2.75 on a 4.0 scale. Students will be admitted according to the criteria for selection of upper division students.
  2. Completion of the following courses with a grade of "C" or better in each: ENGL 1013, ENGL 1023, MATH 1103, BIOL 2014, BIOL 3054, BIOL 3074, CHEM 1114, PSY 2003, PSY 3063, SOC 1003, NUR 2023, NUR 2303, NUR 3103, and NUR 3803.
  3. Completion of the following courses: Social Science - 3 hours, American History or Government - 3 hours, Humanities - 3 hours; Fine Arts - 3 hours; Electives - 8 hours, and two semester hours of physical education. (See General Education requirements for specific course alternatives.) Students may be admitted with some deficiencies in this group of general education prerequisites. The total number of hours is not to exceed six (6). These courses must be completed within one calendar year of entering the upper-division nursing courses.
  4. Acquisition of professional/student liability insurance and current certification of Basic CPR as taught by the American Heart Association, American Red Cross, or persons currently certified in CPR instruction. These must be renewed each year.
  5. Evidence of good health as validated by a physician or nurse practitioner and dentist. This evidence is required each year.
  6. Initiation of Hepatitis B Vaccine series.
  7. Students who withdraw due to failure or for personal reasons must reapply for admission by March 1 or October 1 (whichever is applicable) of the year they wish to re-enter. The student will be considered according to the Admission Criteria.
  8. Students who have not attended Arkansas Tech University during the past year must apply for readmission to the University and the department by March 1 of the year they wish to re-enter.
  9. The nursing program must be completed within four years of entry into upper-division nursing. Part time options are available. A copy of the part time curriculum can be obtained from any nursing advisor.

Criteria for selection of upper division students (applicants will be ranked in groups):

  1. All requirements are complete at the end of the spring semester. GPA≥3.25.
  2. Student has no more than 6 hours of prerequisite requirements outstanding at the end of the spring semester. GPA≥3.25.
  3. All requirements are complete at the end of the spring semester. GPA≥2.75-3.25
  4. Student has no more than 6 hours of prerequisite requirements outstanding at the end of the spring semester. GPA≥2.75-3.25
  5. All but 10 hours of prerequisite requirements are complete at the end of the spring semester. Of the 10 total hours, up to 4 hours of core requirements may remain outstanding at the end of the spring semester. GPA≥2.75
  6. All but 14 hours of prerequisite requirements are complete at the end of the spring semester. Of the 14 total hours, up to 8 hours of core requirements may remain outstanding at the end of the spring semester. GPA≥2.75
  7. Do not admit at this time.

Applications will be ranked according to the above categories and within each category by prerequisite GPA. Admission will be determined by the resulting rank order. In the event that all factors are equal, rank will be determined by random drawing. Note: Prerequisite courses include all courses for freshman and sophomore years listed in the curriculum section of the Tech catalog. Applicants completing prerequisites prior to or during summer session I are required to submit transcripts prior to the registration period for fall semester.

Applicants completing prerequisite requirements during summer session II must submit a written note from the course instructor(s) verifying the grade(s) earned in the course(s). These students will sign a form agreeing to have official transcripts on file in the registrar's office within one month from the date of fall registration.

A student position may be filled in a discretionary manner for exemplary reasons as determined by the committee and approved by the faculty.

Progression Policy Students must achieve a "C" or better in all nursing courses. Repeating of courses during the two years (four levels) of the nursing major is limited to only one level. Exceptions may be made when they are due to circumstances beyond the student's control, such as when an accident or illness causes a student to fail all of the course(s) he/she was taking; however, the student will be encouraged to withdraw instead of remaining in the course(s) and receiving a failing grade. Any exceptions to the proviso will be made through the Head of the Department. Any subsequent failures (achieving less than a "C") in any nursing course will result in permanent dismissal from the program.

Students achieving less than a "C" in theory will automatically fail the accompanying practicum course.

Students who are repeating a practicum course previously failed will be required to audit the accompanying Theories and Concepts course. The student who audits a course must participate fully in all requirements of the course, including taking of tests.

Advanced Placement The different types of nursing education programs and vocational-technical school programs give rise to unique transfer problems. Each student's past education is evaluated individually. In addition, the University and the Department of Nursing have established the following policies:

  1. Arkansas Tech University offers a baccalaureate degree program in nursing. Licensed registered nurses, licensed practical nurses and licensed psychiatric technician nurses may challenge validate, or receive credit for general education and nursing courses that are included in the nursing curriculum. CLEP examinations can be used to challenge or validate the general education courses. The institution's general policy for awarding CLEP credit is followed in determining the successful challenge of courses by these examinations. Transfer credit will be given for prior challenge or validation tests of nursing content credited on official transcripts from other nursing programs. RNs are permitted to receive transfer credit for NUR 3304.
  2. Licensed practical nurses (LPNs) and licensed psychiatric technician nurses (LPTNs) who have met all the lower division nursing curriculum requirements and graduated from an approved Arkansas PN or PTN program or an out-of-state NLN accredited program may receive credit for 13 hours of nursing courses (NUR 3204, NUR 3404, NUR 3103, NUR 3502) if they meet specific requirements.
    1. Have a current LPN or LPTN license in Arkansas.
    2. Graduated less than 12 months prior to entry into the upper division of nursing.
    3. Graduated 12 to 36 months prior to entry into the upper division of nursing and have 1000 hours of nursing employment during the last 12 months prior to entry into the upper division of nursing.
    4. Graduated 37 to 60 months prior to entry into the upper division of nursing and have 2000 hours of nursing employment during the last 24 months prior to entry into the upper division of nursing. NURSING CREDITS WILL BE HELD IN ESCROW PENDING COMPLETION OF THE PROGRAM.

    Licensed practical nurses (LPNs) and licensed psychiatric technician nurses (LPTNs) who do not meet the above criteria can challenge or validate 16 hours of nursing courses that are included in the nursing curriculum. LPNs and LPTNs may challenge or validate nursing courses NUR 3204 and NUR 3404 by taking the National League for Nursing Mobility Profile I with a decision score of 75 (eight credit hours); NUR 2303 by taking the National League for Nursing Normal Nutrition examination with a decision score of 50 (three credit hours); and NUR 3103 and NUR 3502 by taking a written and demonstration skills test developed by the Department of Nursing faculty with a decision score of 75 (five credit hours). Students must enter upper division within two academic years after passing the challenge examination or the examination will be invalid.

  3. Licensed registered nurses who have met all the lower division nursing curriculum requirements and graduated from an associate degree or diploma program that was NLN accredited at the time of graduation may receive credit for 30 hours of nursing courses (NUR 2023, NUR 3103, NUR 3502, NUR 3204, NUR 3606, NUR 3404, NUR 3703, NUR 3805) if they meet specific requirements.
    1. Have a current RN license in Arkansas.
    2. Have graduated less than 12 months prior to entry into the upper division.
    3. Have graduated within 12 to 36 months prior to entry into the upper division of nursing and have 1000 hours of nursing employment during the 12 months immediately prior to entry into the upper division of nursing.
    4. Have graduated 37 to 60 months prior to entry into the upper division of nursing and have 2000 hours of nursing employment during the 24 months immediately prior to entry into the upper division of nursing. NURSING CREDITS WILL BE HELD IN ESCROW PENDING COMPLETION OF THE PROGRAM.

    Registered nurses (RNs) who do not meet the above criteria can challenge or validate 33 hours of nursing that are included in the nursing curriculum.

    RNs can challenge or validate nursing courses by taking the National League for Nursing Mobility Profile II Examination with a decision score of 100 or 50th percentile for Nursing 2023, 3103, 3502, 3204, 3606, 3404, 3703, 3805 for 30 credit hours; and by the National League for Nursing Normal Nutrition Examination with a decision score of 50 for Nursing 2303 for three credit hours; all of which total 33 credit hours. Students must enter the senior-level nursing courses within two academic years after passing the challenge examination or the examination will be considered invalid.

  4. Students who have had health-care education or experience, but are not licensed health-care professionals, will be evaluated individually by the Admission and Progression Committee for advanced placement.
  5. Nursing students other than Registered Nurses must comply with the general institutional provisos; i.e., the last 30 semester hours of work toward a degree must be done in residence; no more than 30 semester hours of correspondence, extension, and credit by examination may be applied toward a degree; and, normally, a maximum of 68 semester hours of acceptable credit may be transferred from community colleges.
  6. Transfer students from senior colleges and universities must comply with the provisions in Item 3 above but are not subject to any credit hour limitations from those institutions.

Curriculum in Baccalaureate Nursing
Freshman YearFallSpring
English Composition I, II (ENGL 1013, 1023)233
Physical Education211
Algebra for General Education (MATH 1103)3
Survey of Chemistry (CHEM 1114)4
Orientation to Nursing (NUR 1001)1
Introductory Sociology (SOC 1003)3
General Psychology (PSY 2003) 3
Human Anatomy (BIOL 2014) 4
Elective3 2
Social Sciences (HIST 2003, 2013 or POLS 2003)2 3
Total     1516
 
Sophomore Year
Developmental Psychology (PSY 3063)3
Human Physiology (BIOL 3074)4
Social Sciences23
Humanities23
Nutrition (NUR 2303)3
Microbiology (BIOL 3054) 4
Applied Pathophysiology (NUR 3803) 3
Fine Arts2 3
Electives3 5
Total     1615
 
Summer Session I or II (prior to Junior Year)
Introduction to Professional Nursing (NUR 2023)3
Skills I (NUR 3103)3
Total     6
 
Junior Year
Theories and Concepts I, II (NUR 3204, 3606)46
Practicum in Nursing I, II (NUR 3404, 3805)45
Skills II (NUR 3502)2
Health Assessment (NUR 3304)4
Nursing Pharmacology (NUR 3703) 3
Total     1414
 
Summer Session (prior to Senior Year)1
RN (Registered Nurse) Seminar (NUR 4201)1 
 
 
Senior Year4
Theories and Concepts III, IV (NUR 4206, 4606)66
Practicum in Nursing III, IV (NUR 4405, 4806)56
Nursing Research (NUR 4303)3
Selected Topics (NUR 4202) 2
Independent Study (NUR 4991-4)5 1-4
Total     1415-18

Notes:
1Required only for the registered nurse student.
2See General Education requirements.
3Nursing students must have 8 hours of general education electives. (ENGL 2053 and NUR 1001 recommended)
4Generic students and LPN's must choose either NUR 4202 or at least 2 hours of NUR 4991-4.
5Registered nurses must choose either NUR 4202 or at least 1 hour of NUR 4991-4.

Chemistry
Geology
Physical Science
Engineering Physics


Department of Physical Sciences
Dr. Mostafa Hemmati, Head
McEver Hall, Room 32
Telephone: (501) 968-0340
Email: Mostafa.Hemmati@mail.atu.edu
Fax: (501) 964-0837
Professors: Allen, Cohoon, Hemmati
Associate Professors: Baker, Maruca, Willcutt
Assistant Professors: Graham, Hardcastle, Lilly, Robertson, Trantham
Instructor: Gann

The Department of Physical Sciences offers majors in chemistry, engineering physics, geology, and physical science. Students interested in teaching science in secondary schools should follow the curriculum in science set forth in this catalog under the teacher certification curricula, School of Education.

The statements and curricula for each of the various degrees are listed below.


Chemistry

The primary purpose of the chemistry program is to educate students in an area of science which is rapidly expanding. The chemists of today are involved in the development of a multitude of new materials such as plastics, drugs, and agricultural products. Research chemists are conducting studies of the fundamental nature of matter which lead to expanded knowledge in medicine and biology. Each course in chemistry stresses laws, theories, and applications in the lecture portion and offers students the opportunity to have "hands-on" experience in well equipped laboratories.

Chemistry is one of the highly recommended courses of study for students interested in pursuing careers in a variety of professional endeavors such as the health sciences: medicine, pharmacy, dentistry, and para-medical fields.

Chemistry offers three curricula. The "General Option" is specifically designed with a minimum of required courses so that students, in cooperation with their faculty academic advisors, can exercise a maximum degree of flexibility in tailoring programs to meet their individual aspirations. By judiciously choosing electives, individuals can enrich these minimum requirements to prepare for futures in law, technical marketing, environmental science, computer science, technical writing, toxicology, education, technical illustration, engineering, health sciences, and biochemistry.

Chemistry also offers an option in environmental studies. The objective of this curriculum is to bring together the disciplines of chemistry, biology, and geology as applied to the environment. Emphasis will be on interdisciplinary approaches to environmental studies.

The program is certified by the American Chemical Society and also offers an "A.C.S. Certified Option." This option is especially recommended for students who plan to pursue graduate studies in chemically related fields or those persons wishing to seek employment as industrial chemists.

Chemistry majors must earn a grade of "C" or better in all chemistry courses (including transfer credits) in order to satisfy graduation requirements.

Curriculum in Chemistry
(General Option)
Freshman YearHours
English Composition I, II (ENGL 1013, 1023)16
Social Sciences13
General Chemistry I, II (CHEM 2124, 2134)8
Calculus I, II (MATH 2914, 2924)28
Principles of Biology (BIOL 1114)4
Electives3
Total32
 
Sophomore Year
Organic Chemistry (CHEM 3254, 3264)8
Quantitative Analysis (CHEM 3245)5
Social Sciences13
Computer Science (COMS 1303 or 2003)3
Physics (PHYS 2114, 2124 or PHYS 2014, 2024)8
Electives6
Total33
 
Junior Year
Physical Chemistry I (CHEM3323)3
Social Sciences13
Fine Arts/Humanities16
Physical/Biological Science elective excluding chemistry33
Electives46
Unified Chemistry Lab I (CHEM 3382)2
Chemistry Seminar (CHEM 3301)1
Social Sciences13
Physical Education12
Total29
 
Senior Year
Chemistry Seminar (CHEM 4401)1
Instrumental Analysis (CHEM 4413)3
Chemistry Electives6
Electives420
Total30


Notes:
1See appropriate alternatives or substitutions in General Education requirements.
2Depending on previous preparation, student should recognize that prerequisite mathematics courses may be required before enrolling in MATH 2914.
3Science elective must be a BIOL, GEOL, PHYS, or PHSC course excluding PHSC 1013, PHSC 1021, and BIOL 1014.
4Two semesters of German, Statistics, and Technical Communications are especially encouraged. (Electives must include sufficient upper-level courses to result in a total of 40 hours at the 3000-4000 level.)


Curriculum in Chemistry
(Environmental Option)
Freshman YearHours
English Composition I, II (ENGL 1013, 1023)16
General Chemistry I, II (CHEM 2124, 2134)8
Principles of Botany (BIOL 1134)4
Computer Science (COMS 1303 or 2003)3
Social Sciences13
Principles of Environmental Science (PHSC 1004)4
Environmental Chemistry (CHEM 2143)3
Total31
 
Sophomore Year
Organic Chemistry (CHEM 3254, 3264)8
Calculus I (MATH 2914)14
Physics (PHYS 2014, 2024)8
Physical Education11
Quantitative Analysis (CHEM 3245)5
Humanities13
Environmental Seminar (CHEM 2111)1
Total30
 
Junior Year
Physical Chemistry I (CHEM 3323)3
Social Sciences13
Principles of Zoology (BIOL 1124)4
Physical Geology (GEOL 1014)4
Fine Arts13
Technical Communications (ENGL 2053)3
Conservation (BIOL 3043)3
Environmental Seminar (CHEM 3111)1
Unified Chemistry Lab I (CHEM 3382)2
Toxicology (CHEM 3353)3
Statistics33
Total32
 
Senior Year
Environmental Politics (POLS 4103)3
Hydrogeology (GEOL 3083)3
Principles of Economics I (ECON 2003)3
Principles of Ecology (BIOL 3114)4
Physical Education11
Microbiology (BIOL 3054)4
Social Sciences13
Instrumental Analysis (CHEM 4413)3
Special Problems (CHEM 4991-4)1-4
Electives5
Environmental Seminar (CHEM 4111)1
Total31-34

Notes:
1See appropriate alternatives or substitutions in General Education requirements.
2Depending on preparation, student should recognize that prerequisite mathematics courses may be required before enrolling in MATH 2914.
3PSY 2053 or MATH 2163.


Curriculum in Chemistry
(ACS Approved Option)
Freshman YearHours
English Composition I, II (ENGL 1013, 1023)16
Social Sciences13
General Chemistry I, II (CHEM 2124, 2134)8
Calculus I, II (MATH 2914, 2924)28
Principles of Biology (BIOL 1114)4
Electives4
Total33
 
Sophomore Year
Organic Chemistry (CHEM 3254, 3264)8
Quantitative Analysis (CHEM 3245)5
Social Sciences13
Computer Science (COMS 1303 or 2003)3
Physics (PHYS 2114, 2124 or PHYS 2014, 2024)8
Calculus III (MATH 2934)4
Total31
 
Junior Year
Social Sciences13
Fine Arts13
Humanities13
Physical/Biological Science elective excluding chemistry33
Physical Chemistry I, II (CHEM 3323, 3333)6
Electives43
Unified Chemistry Lab I (CHEM 3382)2
Chemistry Seminar (CHEM 3301)1
Social Sciences13
Physical Education12
Total29
 
Senior Year
Instrumental Analysis (CHEM 4413)3
Advanced Inorganic Chemistry (CHEM 4423)3
Unified Chemistry Lab II (CHEM 4482)2
Chemistry Seminar (CHEM 4401)1
Principles of Biochemistry (CHEM 3343)3
Chemistry Electives3
Electives414
Special Problems in Chemistry (CHEM 4991-4)2
Total31

Notes:
1See appropriate alternatives or substitutions in General Education requirements.
2Depending on previous preparation, student should recognize that prerequisite mathematics courses may be required before enrolling in MATH 2914.
3Science elective must be a BIOL, GEOL, PHYS, or PHSC course excluding PHSC 1013, PHSC 1021, and BIOL 1014.
4Two semesters of German, Statistics, and Technical Communications are especially encouraged. (Electives must include sufficient upper-level courses to result in a total of 40 hours at the 3000-4000 level.)

Geology

The science of geology seeks to develop an understanding of the Earth's physical and chemical processes, environmental systems, and natural resources. Geologists work in a variety of areas, discovering new sources of fossil fuels, minerals, and economically important rocks. Volcanoes, earthquakes, landforms, surface and subsurface water, earth history, and fossils are all subjects for study. Also, geologists may work as a member of an interdisciplinary team in planning construction projects, sanitary landfills, mine land reclamation, and other environmentally-oriented projects. Employment opportunities for geologists exist in private industry, state and federal government agencies, and teaching at all levels.

Geology students may follow programs designed to prepare them for entry into graduate school, employment in the geotechnical field, or secondary school earth science teaching. The best opportunities exist for students who continue their education and complete the master's or doctor's degree in geology. Major oil and gas companies generally require the master's degree for an entry-level position. Also, excellent employment opportunities are available in the environmental geotechnical field.

The geology major will study for a bachelor of science degree. This degree requires a minimum of 124 semester hours with a minimum of 43 semester hours in geology (professional option), or a minimum of 36 semester hours in geology (environmental option). Students interested in teaching as a profession should follow the Earth Science curriculum listed under teacher certification curricula, School of Education. Additional departmental courses and related courses may be specified for geology majors following particular emphasis programs; and for some emphasis programs, substitutions of the above list may be required. Strongly recommended are MATH 2914 and 2924, or 2163 and 3153.

The geology program is fully interdisciplinary and the student and his/her advisor can "build" an academic program through selection of appropriate electives to suit the special needs and interests of the student.

Curriculum in Geology
(Professional Option)
Freshman YearHours
English Composition I, II (ENGL 1013, 1023)16
Regional Geography (GEOG 2013)13
General Psychology (PSY 2003)13
Physical Geology (GEOL 1014)4
Historical Geology (GEOL 2024)4
College Algebra (MATH 1113)3
Plane Trigonometry (MATH 1203)3
Physical Education12
Biology14
Total32
 
Sophomore Year
Social Sciences (POLS 2003, AMST 2003)6
General Chemistry I, II (CHEM 2124, 2134)8
Mineralogy (GEOL 3014)4
Invertebrate Paleontology (GEOL 3124)4
Petrology (GEOL 3164)4
Electives3
Seminar (GEOL 2001)1
Engineering Graphics (ENGR 1002)2
Total32
 
Junior Year
Fine Arts13
Seminar (GEOL 3001)1
Structural Geology (GEOL 3004)4
Geologic Field Techniques (GEOL 3023)3
Geomorphology (GEOL 3044)4
Physical Principles I, II (PHYS 2014, 2024)8
Introduction to Computer Based Systems (COMS 1003) or FORTRAN Programming (COMS 1103) or Calculus I (MATH 2914) or Introduction to Statistical Methods (MATH 2163)3-4
Electives3-4
Total30
 
Summer after Junior Year (or Senior Year)
Field Geology (GEOL 4006)6
Total6
 
Senior Year
Humanities (ENGL 2003 or PHIL2003)3
Principles of Stratigraphy and Sedimentation (GEOL 4023)3
Seminar (GEOL 4001)1
Electives (6 hours must be 3000/4000 level)17
Total24


Notes:
1See appropriate alternatives or substitutions in General Education requirements.


Curriculum in Geology
(Environmental Option)
Freshman YearHours
English Composition I, II (ENGL 1013, 1023)16
Principles of Economics (ECON 2003)13
General Psychology (PSY 2003)13
Physical Geology (GEOL 1014)4
Historical Geology (GEOL 2024)4
Principles of Environmental Science (PHSC 1004)4
College Algebra (MATH 1113)3
Microcomputer Applications (COMS 2003)3
Physical Education12
Total32
 
Sophomore Year
Social Sciences (POLS 2003, AMST 2003)6
Survey of Chemistry (CHEM 1114)4
Mineralogy (GEOL 3014)4
Petrology (GEOL 3164)4
Environmental Chemistry (CHEM 2143)3
Technical Communication (ENGL 2053)3
Introduction to Biological Science (BIOL 1014)4
Statistics (MATH 2163 or PSY 2053)3
Environmental Seminar (GEOL 2111)1
Total32
 
Junior Year
Fine Arts13
Environmental Seminar (GEOL 3111)1
Structural Geology (GEOL 3004)4
Geologic Field Techniques (GEOL 3023)3
Geomorphology (GEOL 3044)4
Environmental Geology (GEOL 3153)3
Physical Principles (PHYS 2014, 2024)8
Elective (3000-4000 level)3
Engineering Graphics (ENGR 1002)2
Total31
 
Senior Year
Humanities (ENGL 2003 or PHIL 2003)3
Geographic Information Systems (FW 4034)4
Environmental Seminar (GEOL 4111)1
Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry (CHEM 3254)4
Hydrogeology (GEOL 3083)3
Conservation (BIOL 3043)3
Electives (Geology, Mathematics, Biology, Chemistry)11
Total29

Notes:
1See appropriate alternatives or substitutions in General Education requirements.

Physical Science

The baccalaureate degree in physical science offers a program of study in which the student can elect a major emphasis in the physical sciences department. The curriculum is designed with enough flexibility so that students may prepare for a number of professions. Additionally, a broad scientific background can be provided in this curriculum for students anticipating the teaching of science in the secondary schools. The physical science degree curriculum is ideally suited for students planning a military career as it affords a desirable general scientific background.

To qualify for a baccalaureate degree in physical science (general option), the student must complete the following minimum number of semester hours; eight hours in biology, eight hours in chemistry, eight hours in physics, four hours in geology (eight hours in secondary education majors), and nine hours in mathematics. The student must also complete an additional 29 semester hours in four of the following subject areas: chemistry, engineering, geology, mathematics, physics, and physical science ( BIOL 1014 and PHSC 1013, 1021 may not be counted in these hours).

Curriculum in Physical Science
(General Option)
Freshman YearHours
English Composition I, II (ENGL 1013, 1023)16
Social Sciences16
General Chemistry I, II (CHEM 2124, 2134)8
College Algebra (MATH 1113)3
Biology18
Physical Education12
Total33
 
Sophomore Year
Social Sciences16
Physical Geology (GEOL 1014)4
Physical Principles (PHYS 2014, 2024) or General Physics (PHYS 2114, 2124)8
Physical Sciences, Mathematics, or Engineering Electives26
Mathematics Electives6
Total30
 
Junior Year
Fine Arts/Humanities16
Astronomy (PHSC 3053)3
Physical Sciences or Mathematics Electives (3000-4000 level)212
Computer Science (COMS 1103 or 2003)33
Electives7
Total31
 
Senior Year
Meteorology (PHSC 3033)3
Physical Sciences or Mathematics Electives (3000-4000 level)28
Electives (14 hours 3000-4000 level)19
Total30


Notes:
1See appropriate alternatives or substitutions in General Education requirements.
2Excluding MATH 3033, Methods of Teaching Elementary Mathematics.
3Select course appropriate to student's knowledge of computers.

Physical Science (Physics Option)

It is the physicist's task to relate the abstract domain of mathematics to the real world. The ability to apply the laws of logic to the reasoning process is the student physicist's prime mental asset. Imagination and vision are also important to the physicist. Vast amounts of information are assimilated into a few fundamental laws or theories in such diversified fields as optics, mechanics, thermodynamics, electricity and magnetism, quantum mechanics, and nuclear physics.

The physics curriculum is designed to serve the needs of students in the fields of engineering, medicine, and other sciences. The junior and senior courses are tailored for students who desire a concentration in physics for a bachelor of science degree in physical science and/or wish to pursue graduate study in areas such as physics and/or astronomy.

To qualify for a bachelor of science degree in the physical science (physics option) program area, the student must take eight hours in chemistry, three hours in computer science, 27 hours in mathematics, and a minimum of 30 hours in physics. Twenty-two semester hours in these courses must be at the 3000 or 4000 level. A minimum of 38 hours must be taken in the Department of Physical Science.

Curriculum in Physical Science
(Physics Option)
Freshman YearHours
English Composition I, II (ENGL 1013, 1023)16
Social Sciences16
College Algebra (MATH 1113)3
Plane Trigonometry (MATH 1203)3
Calculus I (MATH 2914)4
Physical Education12
General Chemistry I, II (CHEM 2124, 2134)8
Total32
 
Sophomore Year
Calculus II (MATH 2924)4
Calculus III (MATH 2934)4
General Physics (PHYS 2114, 2124)8
Social Sciences16
Biology14
Computer Science (COMS 1103 or COMS 2003)3
Electives23
Total32
 
Junior Year
Fine Arts/Humanities13
Differential Equations (MATH 3243)3
Physics Electives (3000-4000 level)6
Mechanics (PHYS 3023)3
Theory of Electricity and Magnetism (PHYS 3133)3
Electives26
Electric Circuits I (ENGR 2103)3
Electric Circuits II (ENGR 2113)3
Electric Circuits Laboratory (ENGR 2111)1
Total31
 
Senior Year
Fine Arts/Humanities13
Mathematics Elective (3000-4000 level)36
Physics Electives (3000-4000 level)3
Modern Physics (PHYS 3213)3
Quantum Mechanics (PHYS 4013)3
Special Problems in Physics (PHYS 4991-4)1-4
Electives (9 hours must be 3000-4000 level)37-10
Total29


Notes:
1See appropriate alternatives or substitutions in General Education requirements.
2Seven hours of electives must be in physics, chemistry, geology, biology, engineering, or computer science.
3MATH 3033, MATH 3123, and MATH 4113 may not be included in these electives.

Physical Science (Nuclear Physics Option)

The nuclear physics curriculum is designed to provide a baccalaureate degree program for persons employed or those interested in employment in the nuclear power industry. The program provides a combination of courses which will form a firm theoretical foundation for those presently employed as nuclear power plant operators. Students without nuclear power industry experience or training will, in addition to the theoretical education provided through the program, receive sufficient training to enter nuclear power plant specific training. Graduates will also be prepared to enter a graduate school in nuclear physics or nuclear engineering.

Specific course requirements for the degree are listed in the curriculum which follows.

Curriculum in Physical Science
(Nuclear Physics Option)
Freshman YearHours
English Composition I, II (ENGL 1013, 1023)16
Social Sciences13
Calculus I (MATH 2914)4
Calculus II (MATH 2924)4
General Chemistry (CHEM 2124, 2134)8
Engineering Materials (ENGR 2023)3
Computer Science Elective3
Total31
 
Sophomore Year
Social Sciences19
Calculus III (MATH 2934)4
Differential Equations (MATH 3243)3
General Physics (PHYS 2114, 2124)8
Biology14
Physical Education12
Total30
 
Junior Year
Fine Arts/Humanities13
Radiation Health Physics (PHYS 3033)3
Electronics (PHYS 3143)3
Modern Physics (PHYS 3213)3
Basic Nuclear Engineering (ENGR 3503)3
Physics Elective (3000-4000 level)3
Mechanics of Fluids and Hydraulics (ENGR 4403)3
Thermodynamics I (ENGR 3313)3
Engineering Elective3
Electives6
Total33
 
Senior Year
Fine Arts/Humanities13
Business Administration Elective3
Physics Elective (3000-4000 level)8
Power Plant Systems (ENGR 4323)3
Heat Transfer (ENGR 4443)3
Special Problems in Physics (PHYS 4991)1
Electives29
Total30


Notes:
1See appropriate alternatives or substitutions in General Education requirements.
2One hour must be at the 3000/4000 level.

Engineering Physics

Students graduating with an engineering physics degree will be well qualified for jobs requiring highly technical skills and theoretical knowledge. Also, the degree program will prepare students for graduate studies in the fields of physics and engineering. However, those interested in employment immediately after graduation will have numerous alternatives for career choices. Job opportunities for an engineering physics graduate could include employment in industries such as: McDonnell Douglas/Boeing, Texas Instruments, Honeywell, Microsoft, Polaroid, Union Carbide, National Institute of Standards & Technology, Entergy, Tennessee Valley Authority, and Dow Chemical. Also, government agencies such as NASA, National Bureau of Standards, Office of Naval Research, Department of Energy, etc., provide additional employment opportunities for engineering physics graduates.

To qualify for a baccalaureate degree in engineering physics, the student must complete eight hours in chemistry, three hours in computer science, 18 hours in mathematics, 33 hours in physics (including the core physics courses), and 26 hours in engineering. Specific course requirements for the degree are listed in the curriculum which follows.

Curriculum in Engineering Physics
Freshman YearHours
English Composition I, II (ENGL 1013, 1023)16
Social Sciences13
Calculus I (MATH 2914)4
Calculus II (MATH 2924)4
General Chemistry (CHEM 2124, 2134)8
Engineering Materials (ENGR 2023)3
Foundations of Computer Programing I (COMS 2103)3
Physical Education11
Total32
 
Sophomore Year
Social Sciences19
Physical Education11
Calculus III (MATH 2934)4
General Physics (PHYS 2114, 2124)8
Biology14
Differential Equations (MATH 3243)3
Mechanics (PHYS 3023)3
Total32
 
Junior Year
Fine Arts/Humanities13
Business Administration Elective3
Electric Circuits I (ENGR 2103)3
Electric Circuits II (ENGR 2113)3
Electric Circuits Laboratory (ENGR 2111)1
Modern Physics (PHYS 3213)3
Optics (PHYS 3003)3
Mechanics of Materials (ENGR 3013)33
Theory of Electricity and Magnetism (PHYS 3133)3
Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics (PHYS 4003)3
Mathematics Elective (3000-4000 level)23
Total31
 
Senior Year
Fine Arts/Humanities13
Quantum Mechanics (PHYS 4013)3
Electronics (PHYS 3143)3
Mechanics of Fluids and Hydraulics (ENGR 4403)3
Advanced Topics in Physics and Astronomy (PHYS 4213)3
Advanced Engineering Electives (3000-4000 level)6
Heat Transfer (ENGR 4443)3
Special Problems in Physics (PHYS 4991)1
Special Problems in Engineering (ENGR 4991)1
Electives3
Total29


Notes:
1See appropriate alternatives or substitutions in General Education requirements.
2MATH 3033, MATH 3123, and MATH 4113 may not be included in these electives.
3For engineering physics majors PHYS 3023 and PHYS 4003 will satisfy the prerequisites for ENGR 3013 and ENGR 4403.

Pre-Medical
Pre-Dental
Pre-Pharmacy
Pre-Physical Therapy


Pre-Professional Programs
Dr. Robert Allen & Dr. Scott Kirkconnell, Coordinators
McEver Hall, Rooms 20C & 13A

Arkansas Tech University offers complete pre-professional training programs in medicine, dentistry, and pharmacy. Statements and curricula for these programs are listed below.


Pre-Medical or Pre-Dental

Students who plan to complete a bachelor of science degree before entering professional school may take their major in another area but must include as electives the specific courses required by the school of their choice.

It is recommended that students pursuing this course of study plan to graduate with a major in biology, chemistry, physical science or natural science even though the professional field requires only two or three years of college work for admission. Requirements are subject to change and most professional schools are already admitting only students with baccalaureate degrees.

Curriculum in Pre-Medical or Pre-Dental
Freshman YearHours
English Composition I, II (ENGL 1013, 1023)16
Social Sciences16
Principles of Biology (BIOL 1114)4
General Chemistry I, II (CHEM 2124, 2134)8
College Algebra (MATH 1113)3
Plane Trigonometry (MATH 1203)3
Physical Education12
Total32
 
Sophomore Year
Social Sciences16
Principles of Zoology (BIOL 1124)4
Organic Chemistry (CHEM 3254, 3264)8
Physical Principles (PHYS 2014, 2024)8
Principles of Botany (BIOL 1134)4
Total30
 
Additional Requirements:
English Elective3
Calculus I (MATH 2914) or other MATH above MATH 11133-4
 
Junior and Senior Years
The curriculum for the last two years will depend upon the major area of study chosen by each individual student. Most students choose to major either in biology or chemistry but any field is acceptable. Students pursuing admission to a professional school should seek the advice of a member of the faculty pre-professional committee appropriate to his/her major.


Notes:
1See General Education requirements.

Pre-Pharmacy

Few professions can surpass pharmacy in abundance of opportunities. In addition to the very large demand for pharmacists to work in the local pharmacies, many professional pharmacists are medical-service representatives, drug salesmen, executive officers of industry and government, and teachers and researchers in medical fields. Dr. Sadoski serves as the prepharmacy advisor.

Curriculum in Pre-Pharmacy
Freshman YearHours
English Composition I, II (ENGL 1013, 1023)16
Principles of Zoology (BIOL 1124)4
Principles of Botany (BIOL 1134)4
General Chemistry I, II (CHEM 2124, 2134)8
College Algebra (MATH 1113)3
Plane Trigonometry (MATH 1203)3
Social Sciences16
Total34
 
Sophomore Year
Physical Principles I, II (PHYS 2014, 2024)8
Organic Chemistry (CHEM 3254, 3264)8
Accounting Principles I (ACCT 2003)3
Social Sciences16
Humanistic, Behavioral, and Social Sciences Electives26
Total31


Notes:
1See appropriate alternatives or substitutions in General Education requirements.
2Electives in areas such as history, government, sociology, literature, and psychology.

Pre-Physical Therapy

At the earliest convenience after the decision to study in the field, students should contact an institution of their choice and inquire about the prerequisite study program and other requirements for admission into the professional curriculum. Due to the rapidly changing availability of Physical Therapy degree programs and due to changes in entrance requirements, students should seek the most current information available. Searches on the World Wide Web are the best way to get the most current information. An advisor from the biology department can guide the student's registration at ATU when the student has secured a curriculum and entrance requirements for a Physical Therapy school that can meet his or her needs.

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