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Contents
Art
Behavioral Sciences
English
Foreign Languages
Music
Social Sciences and Philosophy
Speech, Theatre and Journalism
Index


School of Liberal and Fine Arts

    The School of Liberal and Fine Arts comprises seven departments which offer programs of study leading to baccalaureate and associate degrees as listed below:

  1. Bachelor of Arts

Dr. Georgena Duncan, Dean
Witherspoon Hall, Room 240
Telephone: (501) 968-0274
Email: Georgena.Duncan@mail.atu.edu
Fax: (501) 964-0812
    1. Art
    2. Art Education
    3. English
    4. English Education
    5. Foreign Language
    6. General Studies
  1. Bachelor of Fine Arts
    1. Creative Writing
  2. Associate of Arts
    1. General Studies
  1. History and Political Science
  2. History Education
  3. International Studies
  4. Journalism
  5. Music
  6. Music Education
  1. Psychology
  2. Rehabilitation Science
  3. Sociology
  4. Speech
  5. Speech Education

The school also supervises pre-professional curricula in law and is extensively involved in the general education program.

Through these degree and pre-professional curricula, the departments in the School of Liberal and Fine Arts prepare graduates for a variety of challenging and rewarding careers, either directly or via continued graduate or professional studies. These curricula are designed not only to develop theoretical and technical expertise in the fine arts, humanities, and social sciences, but also to nurture the ability to think clearly and express ideas persuasively. Through its general education commitment and elective offerings, the school's faculty contributes to the broadening of the knowledge and experience of all graduates of Arkansas Tech University by promoting basic competence in communication skills, by fostering an appreciation and understanding of our cultural heritage and current world affairs, and by developing problem-solving techniques.


Associate of Arts in General Studies

The associate of arts degree program in general studies is designed primarily for continuing education students who enroll on a part-time basis in the University's evening school. This degree offers students the background, knowledge, and academic preparation necessary to pursue career opportunities not requiring the traditional four-year degree while at the same time providing the foundation for continued study toward a bachelor's degree. To qualify for the associate of arts in general studies, the student must satisfy the associate degree requirements as stated on page 78 of this catalog and complete the following curriculum:

Curriculum in General Studies (Associate Degree)
 Hours
General Education courses137-39
Electives23-25
Total62

Note:
1See General Education requirements.

Bachelor of Arts in General Studies

The Bachelor of Arts in General Studies is designed primarily for students who wish a broad liberal arts degree, without a concentration in a discipline or preparation for a particular profession. The degree also suits students wishing to pursue a 4 year baccalaureate in order to obtain an education which will furnish them with good writing, analytical and/or speaking skills. The degree will furnish background for employment in a variety of business, governmental, and managerial careers. General Studies requires completion of a general core of classes, with an additional two emphasis blocks. Information on the classes available in the established blocks may be obtained from either the Dean of Liberal and Fine Arts or the Advising Center. Additional blocks will be developed in the future. Once the student has selected emphasis areas an advisor in one of the emphasis areas will be assigned for the degree.

The Bachelor degree in General Studies requires completion of 124 hours. In addition to completion of the stated General Education hours, a student must complete 12 hours in upper level Liberal Arts courses, 6 hours in computer/technology courses, two emphasis blocks of 12-18 hours per block, and 29-39 hours of electives. Current emphasis blocks include the following:

  1. Graphic Design
  2. Fine Arts
  3. Writing
  4. History/Philosophy
  5. Social Studies
  6. Public Relations
  7. Communication
Curriculum in General Studies (Bachelor Degree)
Freshman YearHours
English Composition (ENGL 1013,1023)16
Social Studies16
Science (BIOL 1014, PHSC 1013,1021)18
Algebra for General Education (MATH 1103 or 1113)13
Physical Education12
Electives26
Total31
 
Sophomore YearHours
Social Studies16
Humanities/Fine Arts16
Computer/Technology6
General Studies Emphasis Block Courses39
Electives23
Total30
 
Junior YearHours
General Studies Emphasis Block Courses315
Upper level Liberal Arts (3000-4000 level)33
Electives212
Total30
 
Senior YearHours
Any Additional needed General Studies Emphasis Block Courses312
Upper level Liberal Arts (3000-4000 level)39
Electives212
Total33
Notes:
1See appropriate alternatives or substitutions in General Education Requirements.
2At least 40 of the total hours required for graduation must be 3000-4000 level courses.
3As specified by academic advisor.


Department of Art
Ron R. Reynolds, Head
Art Building, Room 204
Telephone: (501) 968-0244
Email: Ron.Reynolds@mail.atu.edu
Associate Professors: Reynolds, Sullivan
Assistant Professor: Brunson, Mudrinich

The Art Department has as its primary purpose the training and developing of artists. In so doing, the appreciation of art and the involvement in art become an integral part of the program. The objective is to help students become proficient in one or more of the many areas of visual communications.

The department has two major programs leading to the baccalaureate degree. The first, art education, provides the foundations in art necessary to enable the student to qualify and be certified as an art teacher in public and private schools from kindergarten through grade twelve. The second program, art, has two options--fine art and graphic design. The fine art option permits a student to concentrate on drawing, painting, printmaking, ceramics, sculpture, and other special art interests. The graphic design option enables a student to develop the skills and techniques required to engage in the various professional fields of advertising art. All three curricula lead to the bachelor of arts degree.

All art majors will enroll in a foundations core made up of ART 1303, Introduction to Drawing; ART 1403, Two-Dimensional Design; ART 2403, Color Design; ART 2413, Three-Dimensional Design, and ART 2303, Figure Drawing. Graphic design and art education students will be expected to include ART 1203, Introduction to Graphic Design, in their foundations core. These core courses may be taken independently of each other, and more than one may be taken in a semester. All art majors are required to enroll in six hours of World Art History, ART 2103 and 2113.

The Art Department also offers service courses required in the areas of general education and teacher certification.

Curriculum in Art
For Teacher Certification1,4
Freshman YearHours
English Composition (ENGL 1013, 1023)26
Social Sciences26
Science28
Introduction to Drawing (ART 1303)3
Two-Dimensional Design (ART 1403)3
Introduction to Graphic Design (ART 1203)3
Color Design (ART 2403)3
Total32
 
Sophomore Year
Anthropology (ANTH 2003)3
Algebra for General Education (MATH 1103)2,33
Figure Drawing (ART 2303)3
Personal Health and Wellness (HLED 1513)3
Introduction to Secondary Education (SEED 2002)2
Three-Dimensional Design (ART 2413)3
Ceramics (ART 3603)3
Fine Arts2 (excludes ART 2123)3
Painting (ART 2503 or 3533)3
Physical Education23
American Government (POLS 2003)3
Total32
 
Junior Year
Humanities23
Speech (SPH 2003 or 3083)3
Art History3
Art Education I, K-12 (ART 3003)3
Art Education II, K-12 (ART 3013)3
Adolescent Development and Exceptionalities (SEED 3554)4
Introduction to Educational Technology (SEED 3702)2
Introduction to Printmaking (ART 3803)3
Introduction to Sculpture (ART 2703)3
Art Electives (3000-4000 level)4
Total31
 
Senior Year
Art History3
Art Electives (3000-4000 level)7
Special Methods in Art (ART 4701)1
Classroom Application of Educational Psychology (SEED 4556)6
Seminar in Secondary Education (SEED 4503)3
Teaching in the Elementary and Secondary School (SEED 4809)9
Total29

Notes:
1See major and general education statements under Art.
2See appropriate alternatives or substitutions in General Education requirements (Excludes ART 2123).
3Those who are not qualified for these courses must take in addition MATH 0903, or possibly both MATH 0803 and 0903.
4For certification, students must achieve the minimum score on the Praxis II Specialty Area and Principles of Learning and Teaching Tests as determined by the Arkansas Department of Education.


Curriculum in Fine Art
Freshman YearHours
English Composition I, II (ENGL 1013, 1023)16
Social Sciences16
Science18
Introduction to Drawing (ART 1303)3
Two-Dimensional Design (ART 1403)3
Three-Dimensional Design (ART 2413)3
Color Design (ART 2403)3
Total32
 
Sophomore YearHours
Social Sciences16
Physical Education12
Algebra for General Education (MATH 1103)13
Figure Drawing (ART 2303)3
Drawing Studio (ART 3303)3
Ceramics (ART 3603)3
Introduction to Printmaking (ART 3803)3
Introduction to Sculpture (ART 2703)3
Fine Arts13
Introduction to Opaque Painting (ART 2503)
Watercolor Painting (ART 3533)
3
Total32
 
Junior YearHours
Art Electives (3000 - 4000 level)3
Humanities13
Art History6
Electives212
Sculpture Studio I (ART 3703)3
Art Electives (3000 - 4000 level)3
Total30
 
Senior YearHours
Art Electives (3000-4000 level)9
Electives218
Senior Project and Exhibition (ART 4703)3
Total30
Note:
1See appropriate alternatives or substitutions in General Education requirements (Fine Arts requirement excludes ART 2123).
2At least 40 of the total hours required for graduation must be 3000 - 4000 level courses.



Curriculum in Graphic Design1
Freshman YearHours
English Composition I, II (ENGL 1013, 1023)26
Social Sciences26
Science24
Color Design (ART 2403)3
Introduction to Graphic Design (ART 1203)3
Applied Graphic Design (ART 2203)3
Introduction to Drawing (ART 1303)3
Two-Dimensional Design (ART 1403)3
Total31
 
Sophomore YearHours
Social Sciences26
Science24
Algebra for General Education (MATH 1103)23
Figure Drawing (ART 2303)3
Three-Dimensional Design (ART 2413)3
Basic Advertising Art (ART 3213)3
Introduction to Printmaking (ART 3803)3
Fine Arts23
Humanities23
Physical Education22
Total33
 
Junior YearHours
Art History6
Printmaking Studio I (ART 3813)3
Graphic Design39
Electives412
Total30
 
Senior YearHours
Senior Project and Exhibition (ART 4703)3
Art Electives (3000-4000 level)9
Electives418
Total30
Notes:
1Students interested in graphic design should consider electives such as COMS 1003, 2903, and JOUR 1163, 2133, 4133, and 4213.
2See appropriate alternatives or substitutions in General Education requirements (excludes ART 2123).
3Choose nine hours from these courses:
  1. ART 3223, Three-Dimensional Advertising
  2. ART 3233, Production Techniques
  3. ART 4213, Advanced Advertising Art
  4. ART 4233, Techniques for Illustration
4At least 40 hours of the total hour required for graduation must be 3000 - 4000 level courses.


Department of Behavioral Sciences
Dr. Lyman Harris, Head
Witherspoon Hall, Room 347
Telephone: (501) 968-0305
Email: Lyman.Harris@mail.atu.edu
Professors: Harris, Shry
Associate Professors: McLellan, Stewart-Abernathy, Titus, Vaughan
Assistant Professors: Gadberry, Martin, Ward, Wilkerson, Willmering

The Behavioral Sciences Department includes the allied disciplines of psychology, sociology, anthropology, criminal justice, and rehabilitation science. The student is offered the opportunity to develop an understanding of human behavior via the distinctive approach of each discipline as well as an integrated view of interpersonal, social, and cultural activities.

The department has several distinctive goals. It gives basic preparation which may lead to advanced study, it provides a career line for work in state and local agencies and programs, it provides practical experience and skills in human services, and it offers electives to support other programs of study in the University.

The student may select a major or minor in psychology, sociology, and rehabilitation science, or minor in anthropology or criminal justice.

While each area outlines a complete program below, one of the objectives of the department is to maintain maximum flexibility of planning with each student within the context of the broad range of offerings. Each student is encouraged to consult with a departmental advisor at the earliest opportunity to develop a program appropriate to his/her interests and goals.


Psychology

The psychology curriculum is designed to:

  1. Prepare students for advanced study in psychology.
  2. Support, through electives, programs of study in other disciplines.
  3. Give a basis for entry into the job market.
  4. Arouse the curiosity of all students regarding human behavior.
  5. Provide opportunities for experiences outside the classroom by way of field programs and practical experiences.

Major in Psychology The student majoring in psychology must, in addition to meeting the general education requirements:

  1. Complete a minimum of 31 credits in psychology to include:
    (18 credits must be upper division)
    1. PSY 2003 General Psychology
    2. PSY 2053 Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences
    3. PSY 2074 Experimental Psychology
    The remainder of the major may be developed to reflect various career goals.

    If the student plans to go to graduate school, the following should be included: PSY 3053, PSY 3073, PSY 3153, PSY 4013, PSY 4033, PSY 4043.

    If the student plans to seek employment in applied human service settings, the following should be included: PSY 2033, PSY 3003, PSY 3063, PSY 3153, PSY 4003.

    If the student plans to seek employment in business, industry or organizational settings, the following should be included: PSY 2023, PSY 3093, PSY 4033, PSY 4043, PSY 42343.

  2. Complete a minor of 15 credits in a second field of study designed to complement career objectives.

  3. Complete Sociology 1003 and Anthropology 1213 or 2003.
Curriculum in Psychology
Freshman YearHours
English Composition I, II (ENGL 1013, 1023)16
Physical Science14
General Psychology (PSY 2003)3
Social Sciences16
Physical Education12
Algebra for General Education (MATH 1103)13
Introductory Sociology (SOC 1003)3
Electives5
Total32
 
Sophomore YearHours
Principles of Zoology (BIOL 1124) or Human Anatomy (BIOL 2014)4
Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences (PSY 2053) (fall semester)3
Social Sciences16
Experimental Psychology (PSY 2074) (spring semester)4
Psychology Electives3
Electives212
Total32
 
Junior YearHours
Fine Arts13
Humanities13
Anthropology (ANTH 1213 or 2003)3
Psychology (3000-4000 level)9
Minor6
Electives46
Total30
 
Senior YearHours
Psychology (3000-4000 level)9
Minor9
Electives412
Total30
Notes:
1See appropriate alternatives or substitutions in General Education requirements.
2Those planning graduate work are urged to consider a foreign language.
3PSY 4234 requires professional/student liability insurance.
4At least 40 of the total hours required for graduation must be 3000 - 4000 level courses.

Rehabilitation Science
Dr. Lyman B. Harris, Director

The Rehabilitation Science curriculum is designed to produce undergraduate rehabilitation generalists who have training and experience conducive to successful careers in various rehabilitation service programs. There are five groups of students to whom the rehabilitation science curriculum will appeal:

  1. Those who wish to prepare for rehabilitation counseling,
  2. Those who wish to prepare for vocational evaluator and employment counselor careers,
  3. Those who wish to prepare for social caseworker careers,
  4. Those who desire to build a strong foundation for more intensive specialization at the graduate level in any of the rehabilitation services careers,
  5. Those who are majoring in related disciplines such as psychology, sociology, education, nursing, and recreation who are concerned about the "human dimensions" of the populations to which they relate.

The primary objective of the program is to develop personnel for careers with state and private agencies providing rehabilitation services to individuals with a disability. Until such time as the student enters graduate school, he/she may work in a variety of roles such as caseworker, evaluator, parole officer, probation officer, juvenile intake officer, children and family service worker, or a number of rehabilitation service-provider roles in direct service agencies or institutions. Examples of these agencies and institutions are state rehabilitation services, departments of social services, mental retardation centers, mental hospitals, correctional facilities, nursing homes, halfway houses, sheltered workshops, employment security divisions, disability determination, and occupational skills training schools.

Major in Rehabilitation Science The student majoring in rehabilitation science must, in addition to completing the general education requirements:

  1. Complete the rehabilitation and related required core, including 12 hours of field placement or a 12-hour internship in rehabilitation science.3 If the field placements are taken instead of an internship, the student must take one placement course in the core rehabilitation area, one in the chosen primary emphasis area, and one in the chosen secondary emphasis area.1
  2. Complete a minimum of 12 non-field placement hours in a primary emphasis area and 6 hours of the indicated courses in a secondary emphasis area. Emphasis areas available are vocational rehabilitation, social services, aging, corrections, and child welfare.
Curriculum in Rehabilitation Science
Freshman YearHours
English Composition I, II (ENGL 1013, 1023)26
Physical Science24
General Psychology (PSY 2003)3
Introduction to Sociology (SOC 1003)3
Introduction to Rehabilitation Services (RS 2003)3
Physical Education22
Algebra for General Education (MATH 1103)23
Electives8
Total32
 
Sophomore YearHours
Principles of Zoology (BIOL 1124) or Basic Human Anatomy (BIOL 2014)4
Developmental Psychology (PSY 3063)3
Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences (PSY 2053) (Fall)3
Research & Data Methods for Rehabilitation Science (RS 2093) (Spring)3
Medical & Psychosocial Aspects of Disability (RS 3004) (Spring)4
The World of Work (RS 3013) (Fall)3
Anthropology (ANTH 1213 or 2003)3
Elective6
Special Emphasis Area3
Total32
 
Junior YearHours
Principles & Techniques of Rehabilitation Services (RS 3023) (Fall)3
Abnormal Psychology (PSY 3003) (Fall)3
Fine Arts23
Humanities23
Organization and Structure in the Rehabilitation-Human Services Setting (RS 3073) (Fall)3
Field Placement and/or Special Emphasis Area39-10
Electives45-6
Total30
 
Senior YearHours
Social Sciences (HIST 2003, 2013, or POLS 2003)23
Field Placements or Internship38-12
Special Emphasis Area6-10
Electives49
Total30
Notes:
1Students are encouraged to become involved in community volunteer service programs to broaden their knowledge of community services and to assist in placement choices prior to enrolling for a field placement. A catalog listing possible placement sites will be in the director's office to assist students in placement choices. Prior to making placement choices, the student will have a conference with the placement director to discuss possible placement sites.
2See appropriate alternatives or substitutions in General Education requirements.
3Internships and field placements require professional/student liability insurance.
4At least 40 of the total hours required for graduation must be 3000 - 4000 level courses.


Sociology

The sociology curriculum is designed to prepare students for employment in a range of careers or for advanced study in sociology, law, criminology, criminal justice, counseling, education, research, population, social work or other related fields. Sociology prepares majors to deal with the constant social change that is today's world. In addition to understanding the organization of social groups and the human behaviors that comprise everyday social life, sociologists remain important contributors to the collection of data pertaining to these levels of human behavior. The undergraduate sociology major learns to identify problems, formulate appropriate questions, search for answers, analyze data, organize information, and express themselves in written and spoken communication. The undergraduate major provides a strong liberal arts degree for entry-level positions throughout the business, social service, and government worlds. The emphasis areas within sociology will provide students with knowledge and skills unique to criminology and populations, health and life course issues, and the effects of these on national and global populations.

Major in Sociology In addition to the general education requirements, a student majoring in sociology must complete ANTH 2003, PSY 2003, RS 2003, COMS 1003 and COMS 2003 or BUAD 2003, and a 45 hour curriculum as follows:

  1. Complete the sociology core including Introduction to Sociology (SOC 1003). Statistics (SOC 2053), Introduction to Social Research (SOC 3163 and Survey of Sociological Theory (SOC 2083).
  2. Students will complete 27 hours in their chosen emphasis area or 27 hours of 3000/4000 level sociology courses for a generalist sociology emphasis. Emphasis area or generalist study will be decided upon in consultation with student's advisor.
  3. All majors will complete a two-semester capstone experience during their senior year which will include an intensive research experience that integrates theoretical and emphasis area perspectives. Both qualitative and quantitative elements of social research will be included in the capstone experience. Upon completion of this capstone, students will have completed a major independent research project to be used as part of a job search or graduate school portfolio.
  1. Criminology Emphasis:
    1. Introduction to Criminal Justice (SOC/CJ 2003)
    2. Crime and Delinquency (SOC/CJ 3043)
    3. Social Organizations (SOC 3003)
    4. Juvenile Justice System (SOC/CJ 3103)
    5. Abnormal Psychology (PSY 3003)
    6. Prison and Corrections (SOC/CJ 3153)
    7. American Constitutional Law 1941 - present (CJ/POLS 4063)
    8. Substance Abuse (RS 4163)
    9. Stratification (SOC 4063) or Minority Relations (SOC 4003)
    10. The Law in Action (SOC/CJ 3206)
  2. Population, Health, and Life Course Emphasis:
    1. Self and Society (SOC 2013)
    2. Communities (SOC 3063)
    3. The Family (SOC 3023) or Minority Relations (SOC 4003)
    4. Population Problems (SOC 3053)
    5. Sociology of Education (SOC 3093) or Stratification (SOC 4063)
    6. Social Gerontology (SOC 3173)
    7. Sociology of Health and Illness (SOC 4053)
    8. Psychology of Death and Dying (PSY 4003)
    9. Social Movements and Social Change (SOC 3113)
  3. Generalist Emphasis:
    1. Students will choose nine 3000/4000 level courses in consultation with their sociology faculty advisor. Emphasis will be on preparation for advanced degree in Sociology or related area.

Curriculum in Sociology
Freshman YearHours
English Composition I, II (ENGL 1013, 1023)16
Social Sciences16
Science14
Algebra for General Education (MATH 1103)13
Physical Education11
Introductory Sociology (SOC 1003)3
Introduction to Computer Based Systems (COMS 1003)3
Sociology (SOC 2013, SOC/CJ 2003 or SOC 2033)3
Fine Arts/Humanities13
Total32
 
Sophomore YearHours
Social Sciences16
Science14
General Psychology (PSY 2003)3
Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences (SOC 2053)3
Survey of Social Theory (SOC 2083)3
Computer Applications (COMS 2003 or BUAD 2003)3
Emphasis Area Sociology Course(s)6
Fine Arts/Humanities13
Physical Education11
Total32
 
Junior YearHours
Introduction to Social Research (SOC 3163)3
Emphasis Area courses (3000/4000)15
Cultural Anthropology (ANTH 2003)3
Electives or related courses2,311
Total32
 
Senior YearHours
Emphasis Area courses (3000/4000)3
Sociology Capstone I, II (SOC 4163, 4173)6
Electives or related courses2,319
Total28

Notes:
1See appropriate alternatives or substitutions in General Education requirements.
2To be chosen in consultation with advisor. Students are strongly encouraged to pursue a foreign language.
3Sufficient courses at 3000/4000 level to constitute 40 hours.


Anthropology

The anthropology curriculum concentrates on the areas of cultural anthropology. Within this subdivision, the emphasis concerns historic and contemporary cultures (ethnography) and prehistoric cultures (archeology).

The Russellville Station of the Arkansas Archeological Survey is located on the Arkansas Tech University campus and offers traditional opportunities in the state for students interested in archeology.

The following courses are offered as electives or to students who wish to minor in anthropology:

    ANTH 1213 Introduction to Anthropology
  1. ANTH 2003 Cultural Anthropology
  2. ANTH 3203 Indians of North America
  3. ANTH 3223 North American Archeology
  4. ANTH 3233 MesoAmerican Archeology
  5. ANTH 3241-4 Seminar in Anthropology
  6. ANTH 4206 Workshop in Anthropology
  7. ANTH 4991-4 Special Problems in Anthropology

Criminal Justice
Dr. Judy Vaughan, Coordinator

The criminal justice curriculum is designed to:

  1. Prepare students for a career in the field of criminal justice, e.g., police work, probation/parole, federal law enforcement.
  2. Provide a minor for students whose major department requires one.

The following courses are offered as electives to students who wish to minor in criminal justice:

  1. CJ 2003 Introduction to Criminal Justice
  2. CJ 2013 Introduction to Security
  3. CJ 3023 Judicial Process
  4. CJ 3033 The Criminal Mind
  5. CJ 3043 Crime and Delinquency
  6. CJ 3063 Probation and Parole
  7. CJ 3073 Police Administration
  8. CJ 3103 The Juvenile Justice System
  9. CJ 3153 Prison and Corrections
  10. CJ 3206 Law in Action
  11. CJ 4023 Law and the Legal System
  12. CJ 4053 Criminal Law and the Constitution
  13. CJ 4063 American Constitutional Law 1941-Present: Civil Liberties and Civil Rights
  14. CJ 4991-4 Special Problems in Criminal Justice


Department of English
Dr. Carl W. Brucker, Head
Witherspoon Hall, Room 142
Telephone: (501) 968-0256
Email: Carl.Brucker@mail.atu.edu
Professors: Brucker, Lake, Lombardo, Schrock
Associate Professors: Darkwah, Harrison, Oller, Philpotts, Poznar, Ritchie, Wilson
Assistant Professors: Gills, Worley
Instructors: N. Cox, S. Tyson

The Department of English offers majors and teacher certification in creative writing and English.

The department's programs seek to help students express themselves effectively, especially in writing; develop a respect for and an understanding of language; appreciate and profit from a study of our common literary heritage; increase their awareness of and empathy for diverse peoples and cultures; discover the relevance of ideas and values found in their reading; and learn to think critically and evaluate wisely.

Departmental majors are prepared for a variety of careers in advertising, communications, education, government, management, personnel work, public relations, and sales. A degree in creative writing or English also provides an excellent undergraduate preparation for the student planning to pursue graduate study of business, law, or the humanities.

The degree program in English requires 36 semester hours in English: ENGL 2513, 3013; 3023; 3043; 3313; 3323; 3413; 3423; 4013; and three English electives. The English major must also complete four semesters of study in one foreign language.

The degree program in creative writing requires 42 hours in English: ENGL 2043; 2513; a minimum of 3 hours in 2881 and/or 4881-4; 3043; 3083; 3093; 3313; 3323; 3413; 3423; 4093; and three English electives. The creative writing major must also complete four semesters of study in one foreign language.

Students who plan to use an English or creative writing degree as a preparation for law school are encouraged to complete some of the following electives in addition to their required courses: BUAD 2033, Legal Environment in Business; PHIL 3103, Logic; CJ 4023, Law and the Legal System; POLS 4043, American Constitutional Law to 1941; POLS 4063, American Constitutional Law 1941-Present; CJ 4053, Criminal Law and the Constitution; SOC/CJ 3043, Crime and Delinquency; SPH 2003, Public Speaking; SPH 2111-2121, Debate Practicum; SPH 3053, Persuasion.

The curricula for teacher certification in creative writing and English are printed in the catalog section for the School of Education.

Curriculum in English (BA Degree)
Freshman YearHours
English Composition I, II (ENGL 1013, 1023)16
Social Sciences16
Science14
Algebra for General Education (MATH 1103)13
Foreign Language26-8
Physical Education12
Elective43
Total30-32
 
Sophomore YearHours
Social Sciences16
Fine Arts13
Science14
Foreign Language26-8
Methods of Research (ENGL 2513)3
English Electives36
Humanities13
Total31-33
 
Junior YearHours
Modern American Literature (ENGL 3323)3
Advanced Composition (ENGL 3043)3
American Literature to 1900 (ENGL 3313)3
British Literature to 1800 (ENGL 3413)3
British Literature since 1800 (ENGL 3423)3
Introduction to Linguistics (ENGL 3023)3
Systems of Grammar (ENGL 3013)3
Electives49
Total30
 
Senior YearHours
History of the English Language (ENGL 4013)3
English Elective (3000-4000 level)33
Electives423-27
Total29-33

Notes:
1See appropriate alternatives or substitutions in General Education requirements.
2All minimum college hours (at least four semesters) should be in one language. Students with previous study in a foreign language should refer to Foreign Language Advanced Placement and Credit under Credit by Examination.
3Any 2-4000 level English courses excluding English 2003, 2013, 2113, and 2173.
4Electives must include sufficient upper-level courses to result in a total of 40 hours at the 3000 - 4000 level.



Curriculum in Creative Writing (BFA Degree)
Freshman YearHours
English Composition I, II (ENGL 1013, 1023)16
Social Sciences16
Science14
Algebra for General Education (MATH 1103)13
Foreign Language26-8
Physical Education12
Electives3
Total30-32
 
Sophomore YearHours
Social Sciences16
Fine Arts13
Science14
Foreign Language26-8
Methods of Research (ENGL 2513)3
Creative Writing: Form and Theory (ENGL 2043)3
Practicum: Literary Journal Publication (ENGL 2881)31
Humanities13
Total29-31
 
Junior YearHours
Modern American Literature (ENGL 3323)3
American Literature to 1900 (ENGL 3313)3
English Elective46
British Literature to 1800 (ENGL 3413)3
British Literature since 1800 (ENGL 3423)3
Creative Writing Workshop: Fiction (ENGL 3083)3
Creative Writing Workshop: Poetry (ENGL 3093)3
Advanced Composition (ENGL 3043)3
Practicum: Literary Journal Publication (ENGL 2881)31
Electives3
Total31
 
Senior YearHours
English Elective (3000-4000 level)3
Electives23-27
Practicum: Editing Literary Journal (ENGL 4881-4)31
Seminar: Creative Writing (ENGL 4093)3
Total30-34

Notes:
1See appropriate alternatives or substitutions in General Education requirements.
2All minimum college hours (at least four semesters) should be in one language. Students with previous study in a foreign language should refer to Foreign Language Advanced Placement and Credit under Credit by Examination.
3Students must complete a minimum of three semester hours and may complete a maximum of nine semester hours selected from ENGL 2881 and/or ENGL 4881-4. No more than five semester hours may be ENGL 2881 and no more than six semester hours may be ENGL 4881-4.
4Any 2-4000 level English courses excluding English 2003, 2013, 2113, and 2173.


Department of Foreign Languages and International Studies
Dr. Ursula Chandler, Head
Dean Hall, Room 116
Telephone: (501) 964-0807
E-Mail: Ursula.Chandler@mail.atu.edu
Fax: (501) 964-0539
Professors: Chandler, Zakharian
Associate Professor: Ward
Assistant Professor: Camacho

Mission Statement: The mission of the Department of Foreign Languages and International Studies is to help students attain a state of intellectual freedom that enables them to grow personally, socially, and professionally. The department works to develop students' learning skills in foreign languages, to teach students to communicate effectively, to foster cultural understanding, tolerance and world perspective, and to prepare students to live in a global society.

The Department of Foreign Languages and International Studies offers programs of study leading to a baccalaureate degree in French, German, Spanish, and International Studies. The programs are designed to prepare students to communicate effectively in another language, as well as live, study, or work in international settings. Study or work abroad opportunities, either as part of or after the four-year program, will be available to students. The programs are supported by the most up-to-date technology, available to students in the Foreign Language Lab located in Dean Hall. Departmental majors will be prepared to pursue graduate degrees and a variety of careers in business and industry, communication, education, foreign service, government, and public relations.

Tech is one of only two universities in Arkansas offering a comprehensive foreign language program. Students may choose a degree program in French, German, or Spanish, and also pursue studies in Chinese, Greek, Italian, Japanese, Latin, and Russian.

The Degree Program in Foreign Languages requires 34 hours in a foreign language. The student's credit by examination and course work must total 34 semester hours.

Foreign Language majors may pursue teacher certification in French, German, and Spanish. The curricula for teacher certification in French, German, and Spanish are printed in the catalog section of the School of Education.

Students with previous foreign language experience may petition the Department of Foreign Languages and International Studies for advanced placement and credit. Petitioners will be given written and/or oral examinations by a foreign language faculty member who will then recommend an appropriate foreign language placement level. This placement level will not exceed FR 3013, GER 3013, GRK 2023, JPN 2024, LAT 2013, or SPAN 3013, and will be approved by the department head. Students who have omitted one or more courses in the basic language sequence will receive credit for omitted courses when they have validated their advanced placement by passing the course into which they are placed with a grade of "C" or better.

Students have the opportunity to attend universities abroad for a semester or an academic year (see the catalog entry under Student Exchange Opportunities).

Student advising is an important part of the programs. Departmental majors will work closely with their faculty advisors to assure successful academic progress.

Curriculum in Foreign Languages
(BA Degree with Concentration in French, German, or Spanish)
Freshman YearHours
English Composition I, II (ENGL 1013, 1023)6
Science4
World Civilization I, II (HIST 1503, 1513)6
Mathematics (MATH 1103 or 1113)3
Physical Education2
Beginning Language I, II(FR, GER, SPAN 1014, 1024)28
Introduction to Film (ENGL 2173)13
Total32
 
Sophomore YearHours
Introduction to Music (MUS 2003) or Experiencing Art (ART 2123)3
Cultural Anthropology (ANTH 2003)3
Science4
Intermediate Language I, II (FR, GER, SPAN 2014, 2024)28
Electives312
Total30
 
Junior YearHours
Introduction to World or American Literature (ENGL 2003 or 2013)3
U.S. History (HIST 2003 or 2013)3
Conversation and Composition I, II (FR, GER, SPAN 3003, 3013)6
Introduction to Linguistics (FR, GER, SPAN 3023)3
Culture and Civilization (FR, GER 3113, SPAN 3123 or 3133)3
Electives312
Total30
 
Senior YearHours
Foreign Language Literature (FR, GER, SPAN 4213, 4223)6
Electives26
Total32

Notes:
1See all appropriate alternatives or substitutions in General Education Requirements.
2Students with previous study in a foreign language should refer to Foreign Language Advanced Placement and Credit under Credit by Examination.
3At least 40 of the total hours required for graduation must be 3000-4000 level.



International Studies

The International Studies program is interdisciplinary. The Degree Program in International Studies requires, in addition to the general education core and electives, 27 hours in an area of concentration of the student's choosing, 30 hours of courses selected from an International Studies Core and 9 hours in a foreign language above the 2000 level. Students may select the 27 hours in an area of concentration from any of the departmental majors offered at Tech. All courses need to be in the area of concentration. Students must follow the established course sequence and prerequisite requirements already defined in the catalog.

International Studies majors will have two faculty advisors. The Head of the Department of Foreign Languages and International Studies will supervise the general education, foreign language and international studies requirements and an advisor in the student's area of concentration will supervise the discipline requirements.

International Studies majors who choose a foreign language as an area of concentration, must complete the foreign language requirement of 9 hours above the 2000 level in a second foreign language. Students with previous foreign language experience may petition the Department of Foreign Languages and International Studies for advanced placement and credit. Petitioners will be given written and/or oral examinations by a foreign language faculty member who will then recommend an appropriate foreign language placement level. This placement level will not exceed FR 3013, GER 3013, GRK 2023, JPN 2024, LAT 2013, or SPAN 3013, and will be approved by the department head. Students who have omitted one or more courses in the basic language sequence will receive credit for omitted courses when they have validated their advanced placement by passing the course into which they are placed with a grade of "C" or better.

One of the unique features of the International Studies program is the paid internship opportunities for its graduates. Qualified students, graduating with an overall grade point average of B or better, will receive assistance in obtaining paid internships or job placements with international companies and organizations.

International Studies Degree Requirements
General Education Requirements37 Hours
English Composition I, II (ENGL 1013, 1023)36
Fine Arts (ART 2123, MUS 2003 or TH 2273)3
Humanities (ENGL 2003 or ENGL 2013)3
Mathematics (MATH 1113)3
Physical Education3 2
Science3 8
Social Sciences (HIST 1503, 1513 and POLS 2003
and AMST 2003)12
Area of Concentration127 Hours
International Studies Requirements30 Hours
Microcomputer Applications (COMS 2003)3
Public Speaking (SPH 2003)3
Global Studies in Modern Times (HIST 4803)3
Ethics (PHIL 3023)3
Comparative Government, or International Relations, or
Current Issues in Global Politics, or Modern European
Political Theory (POLS 3403, 3413, 4403, or HIST 3463)6
History of Latin America, or Europe in the Twentieth
Century, or History of Russia, or The Modern Far East, or History
of Modern Africa (HIST 3353, 4443, 4463,4603, or 4703) 3
Regional Geography of the World, or Geography of Latin
America, or Geography of Asia (GEOG 2013, 3303, or 3703)3
Religions of the World, or Modern Philosophy, or
Contemporary Philosophy (PHIL 2013, 3013, or 3113)3
Principles of Economics, or General Psychology, or
Introductory Sociology (Econ 2003, PSY 2003, or SOC 1003)3
Foreign Language Requirements9 Hours
9 hours in one foreign language must be above the 2000 level Electives221 Hours Total124 Hours
Notes:
1Four semesters must be in one language. Students with previous study in a foreign language should refer to Foreign Language Advanced Placement and Credit under Credit by Examination.
2At least 40 of the total hours required for graduation must be 3000-4000 level courses.
3See General Education requirements.



Department of Music
Mr. V. Andy Anders, Head
Witherspoon Hall, Room 106
Telephone: (501) 968-0368
Email: Andy.Anders@mail.atu.edu
Associate Professors: Anders, Barrow, Cooper, K.L. Futterer, K.T. Futterer, N. Herrick, Kiehl, P.D. Parker
Assistant Professors: K. Johnson, T. Smith, Wheeler
Instructors: H. Gale, Kimball

The Department of Music has an established reputation for the superior quality of the music-teacher preparation program and for high standards in musical performance. The various musical organizations have been identified as distinctive or exemplary programs and have been featured on state, regional, and national convention programs.

The objectives of the music department are:

  1. To provide the necessary and desirable professional preparation for the training of accredited music teachers for the public schools.
  2. To provide the professional preparation for those students who desire to work toward professional performance and/or teaching in higher education.
  3. To provide opportunities for the cultural growth and development of all college students.
  4. To provide a solid musical background for those students working toward highly specialized programs such as music therapy, church music, and composition.
  5. To provide a basic background for those students who are preparing for a profession (elementary education, parks and recreation) who need some training in, a knowledge of, and/or an appreciation for music.
  6. To provide opportunities for meaningful professional growth through direct involvement in musical performance in large and small vocal and/or instrumental ensembles.
  7. To provide musical, cultural, and educational leadership for the institution, community, and state.
  8. To provide a variety of extra-curricular and public-relations functions for the university community.

To meet the requirements for the baccalaureate degree in music, the student must complete 124 semester hours. The music major must include 16 hours in applied music, 8 hours in required ensembles (band, choir, or orchestra), 16 hours in music theory and ear training, 13 hours in music history, counterpoint, form analysis, and 4 hours of piano (or 4 hours of accompanying seminar for piano majors).

To meet the requirements for the baccalaureate degree in music education, students must complete 134-138 hours as given in the curriculum in music education. Instrumental majors must have four semesters of piano. Students may be exempted from the above piano requirements if they demonstrate acceptable proficiencies. Keyboard and instrumental majors must have one semester of class voice or choir.

A senior recital is required of all students. Music majors are required to perform in student recitals each semester. All music majors are required to attend a prescribed number of campus concerts and recitals. Successful completion of six semesters of recital attendance is required.

Private instruction in the student's major performance area is required of all music majors. Such study involves one one-hour lesson or equivalent per week and carries two semester hours credit. Students may elect to study in additional areas of applied music for either one or two hours credit. A fee of $20 per semester hour credit is assessed for all applied music study. The fee for class piano and for class voice is $10 per semester.

Lessons and practice requirements for the applied music courses are as follows: Two-hour credit courses, one one-hour lesson and 12 hours of practice a week; one-hour credit courses, one 30-minute lesson and six hours practice a week. The two-hour courses are primarily for music majors.

Curriculum in Music
Freshman YearHours
English Composition I, II (ENGL 1013, 1023)26
Social Sciences23
Recital Attendance (MUS 1000)10
Ear Training I and II (MUS 1731, 1741)2
Theory I and II (MUS 1713, 1723)6
Class Piano (MUS 1441, I and II)1 or Piano (MUS 1201)1 or Accompanying Seminar (MUS 2201)10-2
Applied Music (MUS 1??2)1,44
Band, Orchestra, University Choir, or Concert Chorale (MUS 1501, 1561, 1571, or 1681)12
Algebra for General Education or College Algebra (MATH 1103 or 1113)23
Physical Education22
Total28-30
 
Sophomore YearHours
Science28
Foreign Language6-8
Recital Attendance (MUS 1000)10
Ear Training III and IV (MUS 2731, 2741)2
Theory III and IV (MUS 2713, 2723)6
Class Piano (MUS 1441, III and IV) or Piano (MUS 1201)1 or Accompanying Seminar (MUS 2201)10-2
Applied Music (MUS 1??2)1,54
Band, Orchestra, University Choir, or Concert Chorale (MUS 1501, 1561, 1571, or 1681)12
Total28-32
 
Junior YearHours
Social Sciences29
Fine Arts23
Recital Attendance (MUS 3000)10
Applied Music (MUS 3??2)14
History of Music I and II (MUS 3773, 3783)6
Counterpoint (MUS 3712)2
Band, Orchestra, University Choir, or Concert Chorale (Mus 3501, 3561, 3571, or 3681)1 or Accompanying Seminar (MUS 4201)12
Electives or Minor Field Courses36
Total32
 
Senior YearHours
Humanities23
History of Music III (MUS 3793)3
Senior Recital (MUS 4001)1
Applied Music (MUS 3??2)14
Electives or Minor Field Courses315-21
Form Analysis (MUS 4712)2
Band, Orchestra, University Choir, or Concert Chorale (MUS 3501, 3561, 3571, or 3681)1 or Accompanying Seminar (MUS 4201)12
Total30-36

Notes:
1This course will be taken each semester.
2See appropriate alternatives or substitutions in General Education requirements.
3The student may choose to concentrate studies outside the music department in a single area, with related studies as approved by the head of the chosen department. For example, a minor field concentration in accounting could include approved courses in business administration or a minor field concentration in computer science could include approved courses in mathematics. This option is intended to offer a wide variety of possible minor fields.
4Voice majors must take MUS 1231, Applied Voice, and MUS 1241, 1251, Italian Diction, each semester.
5Voice majors must take MUS 1231, Applied Voice, and MUS 2241 or 2251, German Diction or French Diction, each semester.



Curriculum in Music Education For Teacher Certification4,5
(Instrumental Music Option)
Freshman YearHours
Recital Attendance (MUS 1000)10
Applied Music (MUS 1__2)14
Class Piano I, II (MUS 1441)3 or Piano (MUS 1201)10-2
Stringed Instruments (MUS 1481)1
Band (1501)12
Music Theory I, II (MUS 1713, 1723)6
Ear Training I, II (MUS 1731, 1741)2
Class Voice (MUS 2441) or Choir (MUS 1571)1
English Composition I, II (ENGL1013, 1023)26
Algebra for General Education (MATH 1103)23
Physical Education22
Personal Health and Wellness (HLED 1513)3
Total30-32
 
Sophomore Year
Recital Attendance (MUS 1000)10
Applied Music (MUS 1__2)14
Class Piano III, IV (MUS 1441)3 or Piano (MUS 1201)10-2
Band (1501)12
Woodwind Instruments (MUS 2421, 2431)2
Music Theory III, IV (MUS 2713, 2723)6
Ear Training III, IV (MUS 2731, 2741)2
Science28
Public Speaking (SPH 2003) or Communication and the Classroom Teacher (SPH 3083)3
Introduction to Secondary Education (SEED 2002)2
Physical Education21
Total30-32
 
Junior Year
Recital Attendance (MUS 3000)10
Applied Music (MUS 3__2)14
Secondary Instrumental Methods and Materials I (MUS 3281)1
Band (3501)12
History of Music I, II (MUS 3773, 3783)6
Principles of Conducting (MUS 3802)2
Percussion Instruments (MUS 4461)1
People and Cultures of the World (ANTH2003)3
American Government (POLS 2003)3
Fine Arts23
Social Science23
Educational Technology (SEED3702)2
Total30
 
Senior Year
Counterpoint (MUS 3712)2
Orchestration (MUS 3762)2
History of Music III (MUS 3793)3
Music in the Elementary Classroom (MUS 3853)3
Senior Recital (MUS 4001)1
Secondary Instrumental Methods and Materials II (MUS 4281)1
Form Analysis (MUS 4712)2
Humanities23
Social Science23
Adolescent Development and Exceptionalities (SEED3554)4
Educational Psychology (SEED 4556)6
Total30
 
Senior 9th Semester
Special Methods in Music (MUS 4701)1
Seminar in Secondary Education (SEED 4503)3
Teaching in the Elementary and Secondary School (PK-12) (SEED 4809)9
Total13

Notes:
1This course will be taken every semester.
2See appropriate alternatives or substitutions in General Education requirements.
3Students demonstrating acceptable proficiencies may be exempted from the piano requirement.
4For certification, students must pass the Praxis II speciality area exams.
5Keyboard majors wishing to certify will be advised by the music department head to determine appropriate courses.


Curriculum in Music Education For Teacher Certification4
(Vocal Music Option)
Freshman YearHours
Recital Attendance (MUS 1000)10
Applied Music (MUS 1231)12
Italian Diction (MUS 1241, 1251)2
Class Piano I, II (MUS 1441)3 or Piano (MUS 1201)10-2
Stringed Instruments (MUS 1481)1
University Choir (MUS 1571)1 or Concert Chorale (MUS 1681)12
Music Theory I, II (MUS 1713, 1723)6
Ear Training I, II (MUS 1731, 1741)2
English Composition I, II (ENGL1013, 1023)26
Algebra for General Education (MATH 1103)23
Physical Education22
Personal Health and Wellness (HLED 1513)3
Total29-31
 
Sophomore Year
Recital Attendance (MUS 1000)10
Applied Music (MUS 1231)12
Class Piano III, IV (MUS 1441)3 or Piano (MUS 1201)10-2
University Choir (MUS 1571)1 or Concert Chorale (MUS 1681)12
German Diction (MUS 2241)1
French Diction (MUS 2251)1
Woodwind Instruments (MUS 2421)1
Music Theory III, IV (MUS 2713, 2723)6
Ear Training III, IV (MUS 2731, 2741)2
Brass Instruments (MUS 3401)1
Science28
Public Speaking (SPH 2003) or Communication and the Classroom Teacher (SPH 3083)3
Introduction to Secondary Education (SEED2002)2
Physical Education21
Total32
 
Junior Year
Recital Attendance (MUS 3000)10
Applied Music (MUS 3232)14
University Choir (MUS 3571)1 or Concert Chorale (MUS 3681)12
History of Music I, II (MUS 3773, 3783)6
Principles of Conducting (MUS 3802)2
Secondary Choral Methods and Materials I (MUS 3821)1
Percussion Instruments (MUS 4661)1
Vocal Solo Literature and Pedagogy (MUS 4832)2
Educational Technology (SEED3702)2
American Government (POLS 2003)3
Peoples and Cultures of the World (ANTH2003)3
Fine Arts23
Social Science23
Total32
 
Senior Year
Counterpoint (MUS 3712)2
Orchestration (MUS 3762)2
History of Music III (MUS 3793)3
Music in the Elementary Classroom II (MUS 3853)3
Senior Recital (MUS 4001)1
Form Analysis (MUS 4712)2
Secondary Choral Methods and Materials II (MUS 4821)1
Adolescent Development and Exceptionalities (SEED3554)4
Educational Psychology (SEED 4556)6
Social Science23
Humanities23
Total30
 
Senior 9th Semester
Special Methods in Music (MUS 4701)1
Seminar in Secondary Education (SEED 4503)3
Teaching in the Elementary and Secondary School (PK-12) (SEED 4809)9
Total13

Notes:
1This course will be taken every semester.
2See appropriate alternatives or substitutions in General Education requirements.
3Students demonstrating acceptable proficiencies may be exempted from the piano requirement.
4For certification, students must pass the Praxis II speciality area exams.



Department of Social Sciences and Philosophy
Mr. Bobbie V. Taylor, Head
Witherspoon Hall, Room 255
Telephone: (501) 968-0265
Email: Bobbie.Taylor@mail.atu.edu
Professors: Busch, Duncan, W. Pearson, Rogers
Associate Professors: DeBlack, Krueger, Link, J. Mitchell, Taylor
Assistant Professors: Canerday, DenBeste-Barnett, Jenkins

History and Political Science

The baccalaureate degree in history and political science is excellent preparation for careers in government and education, for further study in graduate school or law school, and for careers in the private sector of the economy. For personal and career flexibility, students can design their degree requirements by selecting courses in American history, European history, or political science. Students may also elect to work toward a social studies secondary teaching certification.

The history and political science degree requires thirty semester hours in history and political science courses in addition to the required General Education courses. In the General Education requirements, majors are required to take the two-course sequence in World Civilization (HIST 1503, 1513), and the two-course sequence in American history survey (HIST 2003, 2013). The thirty semester hours required for the history and political science degree include POLS 2003 (American Government), three additional hours of political science, and HIST 4963 (Research in History) or POLS 4963 (Research in Political Science). Twenty-one of the required thirty semester hours must be on the 3000-4000 level. Students must complete 124 hours for graduation with a degree in history and political science.

Click here for the curriculum for teacher certification in social studies.

Curriculum in History and Political Science
Freshman YearHours
English Composition I, II (ENGL 1013, 1023)16
World Civilization I, II (HIST 1503, 1513)6
Science (BIOL 1014, PHSC 1013, 1021)18
Algebra for General Education (MATH 1103 or 1113)13
Physical Education12
Electives6
Total31
 
Sophomore YearHours
U.S. History to 1865 (HIST 2003)3
U.S. History since 1865 (HIST 2013)3
American Government (POLS 2003)3
History/Political Science3
Electives18
Total30
 
Junior YearHours
Humanities (PHIL 2003)13
Fine Arts13
History/Political Science3
History or Political Science (3000-4000 level)9
Electives (must be 3000-4000 level)212
Total30
 
Senior YearHours
Research in History (HIST 4963) or Research in Political Science (POLS 4963)3
History and/or Political Science (3000-4000 level)9
Electives (12 hours must be 3000-4000 level)221
Total33

Notes:
1See appropriate alternatives or substitutions in General Education requirements.
2At least 40 of the total hours required for graduation must be 3000 - 4000 level courses.



Pre-Law

Accredited law schools have not, in general, adopted specific requirements for pre-law courses. However, in most cases, courses of value to those planning the study of law include: history, economics, political science, philosophy, psychology, sociology, English composition, and literature, as well as courses in the natural sciences, mathematics, and accounting. A broad cultural background is of prime importance. Rather than attempt to prescribe the specific contents of courses to be taken by pre-law students, Arkansas Tech University considers the individual intellectual interests of students of prime importance, encouraging development of the ability to read and comprehend accurately, rapidly, and thoroughly; to think logically; to analyze and weigh situations and materials; to speak and write clearly; and to develop a critical approach and mature study habits.

In addition to (or included within) the other general education and major requirements for a bachelor's degree, the department highly recommends that courses from the following list be included in programs of students interested in attending law school.

  1. POLS2003 American Government
  2. POLS3023 Judicial Process
  3. POLS4043 American Constitutional Law
  4. POLS4063 American Constitutional Law 1941 - present: Civil Liberties and Civil Rights
  5. CJ4053 Criminal Law and the Constitution
  6. CJ4023 Law and the Legal System
  7. BUAD2033 Legal Environment in Business
  8. BUAD2073 Principles of Real Estate
  9. ECON2003 Principles of Economics I
  10. ECON2013 Principles of Economics II
  11. ENGL3043 Advanced Composition
  12. PHIL3103 Logic
  13. SPH2003 Public Speaking
  14. SPH2013 Voice and Diction
  15. SPH2111-2121 Debate Practicum
  16. SPH3053 Persuasion
  17. ACCT2003 Accounting Principles I
  18. ACCT2013 Accounting Principles II
  19. JOUR4123 Laws of Communication
  20. PSY2003 General Psychology
  21. SOC3043 Crime and Delinquency


Department of Speech, Theatre and Journalism
Dr. Donna R. Vocate, Head
Wilson Hall, Room 127
Telephone: (501) 964-0890
Email: Donna.Vocate@mail.atu.edu
Professors: Bolen, Tyson
Associate Professors: J. Gale, Morris, Vocate
Assistant Professors: Brugh, Hawks, Knight, Mumert
Instructor: Donnell

The Speech, Theatre, and Journalism Department offers majors in speech (speech communication and theatre options) and in journalism. Students are involved in both the theoretical and applied dimensions of human communication in these programs. Consequently, students interested in further study and those interested in immediate career opportunities are served. With faculty guidance on the proper selection of courses, students can prepare for: (1) graduate school, (2) public school teaching, (3) recreational or professional theatre, (4) print or broadcast journalism, (5) public relations, or (6) business or government employment requiring communication expertise.

Being able to speak effectively has been recognized as an indicator of the well-educated person throughout recorded history. The ancient Greeks studied the theory and practice of communication under the label of "rhetoric," which also has had a central role in American education since Harvard was founded in 1636. Even in today's technologically sophisticated world, good human communication skills are vitally important for one's personal and professional life. The study of communication in its original form, speech, or its evolved stages of print and electronic communication can prepare the student for citizenship in a democratic society, for more satisfying relationships, and for occupational success.

The journalism major requires 24 semester hours in journalism. Those students who plan to teach at the secondary level should consult the certification requirements for journalism set forth in this catalog under teacher certification curricula, School of Education. Moreover, journalism requires three semesters (9 to 12 hours) of one foreign language.6 All majors must know how to type on a computer keyboard.

Curriculum in Journalism
Freshman YearHours
English Composition I, II (ENGL 1013, 1023)16
World Civilization I, II (HIST 1503, 1513)16
Science14
Algebra for General Education (MATH 1103)13
Introduction to Mass Communication (JOUR 2133)3
Physical Education12
Electives in related areas2,3,46
Total30
 
Sophomore YearHours
Social Sciences16
Science14
Foreign Language66-8
News Writing (JOUR 2143)3
News Reporting (JOUR 3143)3
Journalism Electives3
Electives in related area2,3,42-4
Fine Arts13
Total31
 
Junior YearHours
Humanities13
Journalism (3000-4000 level)6
Electives in related areas (3000-4000 level)2,3,4,517-18
Foreign Language63-4
Total30
 
Senior YearHours
Journalism (3000-4000 level)6
Electives (3000-4000 level)8
Electives in related areas2,3,4,519
Total33

Notes:
1See appropriate alternatives or substitutions in General Education requirements.
2For students interested in a public relations orientation, the following electives are recommended: POLS 3053; PSY 2023; SPH 3053, 3073, 4063; an approved marketing course.
3For students interested in radio and television journalism, the following electives are recommended: SPH 2013, 3063, 3073.
4All journalism majors should take the following electives: SOC 1003; PSY 2003; ECON 2003; POLS 2003, 3033; MGMT 2013; SPH 2003, 3003.
5At least 40 of the total hours required for graduation must be 3000 - 4000 level courses.
6Four semesters must be in one language. Students with previous study in a foreign language should refer to Foreign Language Advanced Placement and Credit under Credit by Examination.




The speech major offers a speech communication option and a theatre option. Both options require 30 semester hours selected from departmental course offerings. Eighteen hours of the 30-hour major must be upper division level. Students planning to teach in the public schools should refer to the suggested curriculum in Speech set forth in this catalog under teacher certification curricula, School of Education.

Those students choosing the speech communication option must take SPH 1003, SPH 1011, SPH 1021, SPH 2003, SPH 3003, SPH 3073, SPH 3123, and SPH 4003. Students choosing the speech communication option, in consultation with an adviser, can design a program in one of the following areas of emphasis: (1) communication for the professions; (2) language and culture; (3) organizational communication; and (4) performance studies.

Curriculum in Speech (Speech Communication Option)
Freshman YearHours
English Composition I, II (ENGL 1013, 1023)16
World Civilization I, II (HIST 1503, 1513)16
Science14
Algebra for General Education (MATH 1103)13
Orientation to Speech Communication Studies (SPH 1011)1
Listening (SPH 1021)1
Introduction to Speech Communication (SPH 1003)3
Elective4
Physical Education12
Total30
 
Sophomore YearHours
Social Sciences16
Science14
Public Speaking (SPH 2003)3
Argumentation (SPH 3123)3
Fine Arts13
Electives12
Total31
 
Junior YearHours
Humanities13
Interpersonal Communication (SPH 3003)3
Group Discussion (SPH 3073)3
Speech Electives (3000-4000 level)3
Electives (9 hours must be 3000-4000 level)18
Total30
 
Senior YearHours
Human Communication Theory (SPH 4003)3
Speech or Theatre Electives (3 hours must be 3000-4000 level)7
Electives (13 hours must be 3000-4000 level)23
Total33

Notes:
1See appropriate alternatives or substitutions in General Education requirements.
2Electives must include sufficient upper-level courses to result in a total of 40 hours at the 3000- 4000 level.




Those students choosing the theatre option must take SPH 1003, SPH 2003, SPH 2013, TH 2213; 6 hours of Theatre History, TH 4263, TH 4273, TH 4313 and TH 4323; and the appropriate Senior Projects course, TH 4243, TH 4543, TH 4843. Students choosing the theatre option, in consultation with an adviser, can design a program in one of the following areas of emphasis (1) acting/directing; (2) design/technical; and (3) theatre history and criticism.

Curriculum in Speech (Theatre Option)
Freshman YearHours
English Composition I, II (ENGL 1013, 1023)16
World Civilization I, II (HIST 1503, 1513)16
Science14
Algebra for General Education (MATH 1103)13
Introduction to Speech Communication (SPH 1003)3
Orientation to Theatrical Studies (TH 2213)3
Elective33
Physical Education12
Total30
 
Sophomore YearHours
Social Sciences16
Science14
Voice and Diction (SPH 2013)3
Public Speaking (SPH 2003)3
Fine Arts13
Electives312
Total31
 
Junior YearHours
Humanities13
Theatre History (Choose 2: TH 4263, TH 4273, TH 4313, TH 4323)6
Theatre/Speech Electives (3000-4000 level)26
Electives (9 hours must be 3000-4000 level)312
Electives35
Total32
 
Senior YearHours
Theatre/Speech Electives (3000-4000 level)23
Electives (3000-4000 level)310
Electives315
Senior Project (TH 4243, TH 4543, or TH 4843)3
Total31

Notes:
1See appropriate alternatives or substitutions in General Education requirements.
2A maximum of seven hours of theatre practice or theatre practicum courses may be counted toward the thirty-hour major.
3Electives must include sufficient upper-level courses to result in a total of 40 hours at the 3000- 4000 level.


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