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Contents
Accounting
Business Education
Management and Marketing
Economics and Finance
Index



School of Business

Vision All School of Business graduates and their employers will recognize the undergraduate preparation for success provided by the School as second to none in Arkansas.



Dr. Thomas P. Tyler, Dean
Corley Building, Room 111D
Telephone: (501) 968-0490
Email: Tom.Tyler@mail.atu.edu
Fax: (501) 968-0677

Mission The primary mission of Arkansas Tech University's School of Business is to provide intellectual foundations to support a life-long learning process. An emphasis is placed on serving full-time undergraduate students from western Arkansas. Education in the fundamental skills and methodologies of business management are combined with a broad exposure to the liberal arts.

We believe that teaching quality and the currency of the subject matter can best be maintained through ongoing professional interaction with peers and the business community. Faculty are expected to engage in scholarly activities and encouraged to participate in service that supports the primary mission. The intellectual contributions orientation is directed toward applied scholarship and instructional development.

School of Business faculty and students use current technology to develop communication, critical thinking and problem-solving skills. Students are encouraged to participate actively in the learning process. A high degree of faculty-student interaction is sought through management of class sizes and individualized advising. The School aspires to prepare its graduates for personal and professional success in an evolving global business environment.


Programs of Study
The School of Business is committed to preparing students for meaningful careers in business, industry, government or education; or for admission to and success in quality graduate programs. This commitment is founded on the belief that graduates from the School should have a strong background in the liberal arts as a basis for mature understanding of the problems of business leadership and management. The objective of the general education curriculum required of all School of Business majors is to ensure they acquire a knowledge and understanding of topics in the humanities, sciences, communications, social sciences and other related subjects to support a lifetime of continual learning.

Students who major in any of the bachelor degree programs in the School of Business are required to complete a common core of business courses. One objective of this curriculum is to provide a foundation of knowledge for business in the areas of accounting, behavioral science, economics, mathematics, and statistics. Another objective of the business core is to ensure that School of Business graduates gain an understanding of perspectives that form the context for business.

The School of Business offers programs of study leading to baccalaureate degrees as listed below:

  1. Bachelor of Science
    1. Accounting
    2. Business Education
    3. Economics and Finance
    4. Management and Marketing

The baccalaureate degree program in business offered by the School of Business is accredited by AACSB - The International Association for Management Education. AACSB is the premier accrediting agency for business schools, stressing academic excellence and a commitment to continuous improvement. Approximately one third of the business schools in the United States and several selected schools internationally have earned AACSB accreditation.

Transfer students - In order to meet baccalaureate degree requirements, all transfer students must take in residence a minimum of fifty percent of the School of Business courses required for the degree. Of these courses, at least 24 hours must be 3000-4000 level, 12 hours must be in the student's major field, and 9 hours must be in the business core curriculum.

Business courses taken at other institutions at the 1000-2000 level which are offered by Tech at the 3000-4000 level must be validated in order to receive credit for specific course requirements. Business courses taken at other institutions at the 3000-4000 level are subject to validation.


In order to enroll in 3000- and 4000-level courses offered by the School of Business, students majoring in business must have the proper course prerequisites and satisfy the following enrollment requirements:

  1. Must have completed a minimum of 54 hours.
  2. Must have a cumulative grade point average of 2.00 or above.
  3. Completion of the following eighteen hours of business foundation courses:
    1. ACCT 2003 and 2013
    2. ECON 2003 and 2013
    3. Six hours from BUAD 2003, BUAD 2033, BUAD 2053
Business students who meet enrollment requirements (1) and (2) above and have only completed fifteen hours of the foundation courses, may enroll in upper division business courses, provided they have the proper course prerequisites and they enroll in the remaining required foundation course in the same semester.

Students majoring in fields outside the School of Business may enroll in 3000- and 4000- level School of Business courses provided they have completed 54 hours of credit prior to enrollment, and provided they have the appropriate course prerequisites.



The Curriculum

A student who majors in one of the bachelor of science degree programs in the School of Business must complete:

  1. The general education requirements as described in this catalog.
  2. The following business core requirements:
    1. ACCT 2003 Accounting Principles I
    2. ACCT 2013 Accounting Principles II
    3. ECON 2003 Principles of Economics I
    4. ECON 2013 Principles of Economics II
    5. BUAD 2003 Business Information Systems
    6. BUAD 2033 Legal Environment of Business
    7. BUAD 2053 Business Statistics
    8. BUAD 3023 Business Communications
    9. ACCT 3063 Managerial Accounting OR ACCT 4023 Cost Accounting
    10. ECON 3003 Money and Banking
    11. FIN 3063 Business Finance
    12. MKT 3043 Principles of Marketing
    13. MGMT 3003 Management and Organizational Behavior
    14. MGMT 3103 Production Management
    15. MGMT 4013 Management Information Systems
    16. MGMT 4083 Business Policy
  3. The following courses in the quantitative area:
    1. MATH 1113 College Algebra1
    2. MATH 2243 Calculus for Business and Economics
  4. Requirements that are listed on the following pages under each major.
  5. Sufficient elective hours to bring the student's total hours to 124 (the number required for graduation).

Note:
1Students who have two years of high school Algebra with a grade of "C" or better and a math ACT score of 22 or above may omit MATH 1113 College Algebra and enroll directly in MATH 2243 Calculus for Business and Economics.

Department of Accounting
Royce D. Jones, Head
Corley Building, Room 204
Telephone: (501) 968-0612
Email: Royce.Jones@mail.atu.edu
Professor: Johnson
Associate Professors: Alexander, Bachman, R. Jones
Assistant Professor: Carr

The Department of Accounting offers a curriculum designed to provide students with professional and technical skills which will allow them to enter and progress in a career in the accounting profession. The program is structured to provide a broad, in-depth, base of knowledge in order for the student to choose from a variety of accounting careers. It is intended that the accounting major will acquire the following:

  1. An understanding of the total system of financial information flow in generating, analyzing, and communicating data useful to management, the public, or governmental agencies.
  2. Techniques of analysis which will permit capturing, measuring, and communicating information to decision makers in the private and public sectors.
  3. Knowledge of generally accepted accounting principles and how to apply them.

Employment opportunities for accounting graduates range from national, regional, and local public accounting firms to corporations, sole proprietorships, and national, state, and local governmental entities. Since the inception of the program in 1959, accounting graduates have established careers in every segment of the business world. The accounting profession offers a promising future for men and women who are comfortable in meeting people, expressing themselves, working in changing environments, and who possess an inquiring and logical thought process.

Holding the licensure designation as a Certified Public Accountant is viewed as evidence of a professional quality in the discipline of accounting. CPAs are viewed by the business world as individuals who possess a professional knowledge of accounting principles and concepts, and have the experiences necessary to make proper application of those principles and concepts. Students who desire to pursue this professional designation can complete the curriculum which will provide them with the necessary academic background to permit the graduate to sit for the uniform certified public accountant examination.

The goal of many students is a career in private accounting rather than public accounting. Professional designations such as Certified Management Accountant (CMA) and Certified Internal Auditor (CIA) are earned by completing examinations offered by their respective professional associations. Accounting majors who desire to complete those certification processes may complete a course of study which will enable them to be a candidate for those professional examinations.

Students who plan to pursue graduate studies should consider the entrance requirements of the graduate degree program which they desire to enter. Faculty advisors will work closely with these students to assist them in planning their course work to meet the graduate degree program requirements. Part of this planning will involve the student sitting for examinations such as the GMAT, GRE, or LSAT.

Professional Examination Requirements--All students who, upon graduation, plan to sit for a professional examination (CPA, CMA, CIA) should obtain a copy of the specific course requirements of the respective examination. The requirements should be considered in planning the student's course of study while completing the degree. The Arkansas State Board of Public Accountancy requires 150 semester hours of credit for first-time CPA Examination candidates effective with the first CPA Examination given in 1998.

The following curriculum in accounting leads to a bachelor of science degree with a major in accounting.


Curriculum in Accounting
Freshman YearFallSpring
English Composition I, II (ENGL 1013, 1023)133
World Civilization I, II (HIST 1503, 1513)33
Science144
Business and Professional Speaking (SPH 2173) 3
College Algebra (MATH 1113)23 
Calculus for Business and Economics (MATH 2243) 3
Electives33 
Total     1616
 
Sophomore YearFallSpring
Accounting Principles I, II (ACCT 2003, 2013)33
Principles of Economics I, II (ECON 2003, 2013)33
Fine Arts/Humanities133
U. S. History or Political Science4 3
Legal Environment of Business (BUAD 2033)3 
Business Statistics (BUAD 2053) 3
Business Information Systems (BUAD 2003)3 
Physical Education111
Total     1616
 
Junior YearFallSpring
Intermediate Accounting I, II (ACCT 3003, 3013)33
Federal Taxes I, II (ACCT 3043, 3053)33
Money and Banking (ECON 3003) 3
Business Communications (BUAD 3023)3 
Electives33 
Management and Organizational Behavior (MGMT 3003)3 
Cost Accounting (ACCT 4023) 3
Production Management (MGMT 3103) 3
Total     1515
 
Senior YearFallSpring
Advanced Accounting I, II (ACCT 4003, 4013)33
Auditing (ACCT 4033)3 
Management Information Systems (MGMT 4013) 3
Business Finance (FIN 3063) 3
Marketing (MKT 3043)3 
Business Policy (MGMT 4083) 3
Electives363
Total     1515

Notes:
1See General Education requirements.
2Students who have two years of high school algebra with a grade of "C" or better and a math ACT score of 22 or above may omit MATH 1113 College Algebra and enroll directly in MATH 2243 Calculus for Business and Economics.
3Thirteen semester credit hours of electives must be earned in courses taught outside the School of Business.
4Three hours must be taken from the following: HIST 2003, HIST 2013 or POLS 2003.

Department of Business and Economics
Dr. David W. Roach, Head
Corley Building, Room 202
Telephone: (501) 968-0492
Email: Dave.Roach@mail.atu.edu
Professors: Brown, Cole, Edwards, McGaughey, Moore, D.Roach, Turner, Tyler
Associate Professors: Benefield, Black, Esteban, Mason, R. Smith
Assistant Professors: Bequette, Braunsberger, Lucas, Yew

The Department of Business and Economics offers majors in business education, management and marketing, and economics and finance. Decision making as a process is stressed. Students are taught to search for and identify important facts and then properly analyze them in developing sound alternative courses of action. Modern analytical techniques as well as the importance of the behavioral sciences are introduced.


Business Education


Management and Marketing

The management and marketing option is designed generally to prepare students for careers as professional managers or as self-employed entrepreneurs in either profit-seeking or not-for-profit organizations. The curriculum emphasizes a comprehensive understanding of business principles and economic activities. The required course of study seeks to prepare the graduate not only for initial employment but for subsequent advancement in his/her chosen vocation. Effective education for business responsibility consists not only of the development of an understanding of the principles and methodologies which govern the organization and administration of the individual business enterprise, but also includes an understanding of larger problems and relationships of the economy as a whole.

Specific objectives of the program are to provide students who select the management and marketing major with the following:

  1. Technical knowledge of the basic skills associated with the use of human, capital, and material resources to achieve organizational goals.
  2. Technical knowledge of the basic skills associated with the movement of products from producers to consumers.
  3. The ability, working individually or as a member of a team, to analyze and solve fundamental management and marketing problems.
Curriculum in Management and Marketing
Freshman YearFallSpring
English Composition I, II (ENGL 1013, 1023)133
World Civilization I, II (HIST 1503, 1513)33
Science144
College Algebra (MATH 1113)23 
General Psychology (PSY 2003)3 
Business and Professional Speaking (SPH 2173) 3
Calculus for Business and Economics (Math 2243) 3
Total     1616
 
Sophomore YearFallSpring
Accounting Principles I, II (ACCT 2003, 2013)33
Principles of Economics I, II (ECON 2003, 2013)33
U. S. History or Political Science5 3
Business Information Systems (BUAD 2003)3 
Business Statistics (BUAD 2053)3 
Legal Environment of Business (BUAD 2033) 3
Fine Arts/Humanities133
Physical Education111
Total     1616
 
Junior YearFallSpring
Management and Organizational Behavior (MGMT 3003)3 
Principles of Marketing (MKT 3043)3 
Production Management (MGMT 3103) 3
Money and Banking (ECON 3003)3 
Business Finance (FIN 3063) 3
Managerial Accounting (ACCT 3063) or
Cost Accounting (ACCT 4023)
 
3
Consumer Behavior (MKT 3163) 3
Business Communications (BUAD 3023)3 
Electives3,633
Total     1515
 
Senior YearFallSpring
Management or Marketing Elective 3
Marketing Research (MKT 4153) 3
Personnel/Human Resource Management (MGMT 4023)3 
Business Policy (MGMT 4083) 3
Human Behavior in Organizations (MGMT 4093)3 
Management Information Systems (MGMT 4013)3 
Electives3,63 
Approved Electives3,4,636
Total     1515

Notes:
1See General Education requirements.
2Students who have two years of high school algebra with a grade of "C" or better and a math ACT score of 22 or above may omit MATH 1113 College Algebra and enroll directly in MATH 2243 Calculus for Business and Economics.
3At least seven hours of electives must be taken outside the School of Business. Foreign language electives are encouraged.
4These electives must be part of an overall plan approved by the student's advisor. The plan should be chosen no later than the student's sophomore year and must be chosen before the student enrolls in elective courses. A student transferring from another institution or other major is required to make the elective plan selection when he or she designates Management and Marketing as a major.
5Three hours must be taken from the following: HIST 2003, HIST 2013 or POLS 2003.
6At least 40 of the total hours required for graduation must be 3000 - 4000 level courses.

Economics and Finance

The study of economics and finance equips students to analyze a broad range of socioeconomic phenomena and policy alternatives. Regulation, environmental protection, economic growth and development, the distribution of income, resource allocation, international trade and finance, comparative economic systems, inflation, and the level of employment are some traditional topics of economics. The finance courses focus on financial definitions and concepts involving sources and uses of funds, personal investment strategy, and financial institutions.

The economics and finance course of study contains a theoretical core supporting the finance, accounting, marketing, and management fields. It is designed to prepare graduates for management or analytical careers in business or government. In addition, the major provides a foundation for graduate study in a variety of fields. Faculty advisors will work closely with students to assist them in planning their course work to achieve personal career objectives.

Students who complete the economics and finance program will be able to:

  1. Understand economic concepts and relationships.
  2. Understand financial decision making at the individual, corporate, and public policy levels.
  3. Improve problem-solving skills through the application of economic and financial concepts.
  4. Evaluate economic and financial issues in a global context.
Curriculum in Economics and Finance
Freshman YearFallSpring
English Composition I, II (ENGL 1013, 1023)133
World Civilization I, II (HIST 1503, 1513)33
Science144
College Algebra (MATH 1113)23 
Calculus for Business and Economics (MATH 2243) 3
Business and Professional Speaking (SPH 2173) 3
Electives33 
Total     1616
 
Sophomore YearFallSpring
Accounting Principles I, II (ACCT 2003, 2013)33
Principles of Economics I, II (ECON 2003, 2013)33
U. S. History or Political Science5 3
Legal Environment of Business (BUAD 2033) 3
Business Information Systems (BUAD 2003)3 
Business Statistics (BUAD 2053)3 
Fine Arts/Humanities133
Physical Education111
Total     1616
 
Junior YearFallSpring
Money and Banking (ECON 3003)3 
Investments I (FIN 3043)3 
Economics/Finance Elective (3000-4000 level)4 3
Business Finance (FIN 3063) 3
Electives3 6
Management and Organizational Behavior (MGMT 3003)3 
Business Communications (BUAD 3023)3 
Principles of Marketing (MKT 3043) 3
Managerial Accounting (ACCT 3063) or
Cost Accounting (ACCT 4023)
3
 
Total     1515
 
Senior YearFallSpring
International Economics and Finance (ECON 4093) 3
Production Management (MGMT 3103) 3
Principles of Risk and Insurance (FIN 4043)3 
Business Policy (MGMT 4083) 3
Management Information Systems (MGMT 4013)3 
Economics/Finance Electives (3000-4000 level)46 
Electives336
Total     1515

Notes:
1See General Education requirements.
2Students who have two years of high school Algebra with a grade of "C" or better and a math ACT score of 22 or above may omit MATH 1113 College Algebra and enroll directly in MATH 2243 Calculus for Business and Economics.
3At least ten hours of electives must be taken outside the School of Business. Foreign language electives are encouraged.
4Six hours of economics electives must be taken from the following: ECON 3073, FIN 4023, and ECON 4053. The remaining three hours may be taken from this group plus ECON 3013 and ECON 4033.
5Three hours must be taken from the following: HIST 2003, HIST 2013 or POLS 2003.
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